I received my master’s degree in 1998 and have been paying towards my federal loans since (aside from a short period of forebearance). I entered the IBR plan about two years ago. In terms of the loan forgiveness component, do my seventeen years of payments prior to entering IBR count towards the 25-year forgiveness mark, or did that 25-year period only commence with my entrance in the IBR program itself (in which case I would conceivably be paying off my loan over 42 years)?
All plans just look at your income from your tax return – so it also depends on how you file (married filing jointly versus married filing separately). That discretionary income is calculated on your AGI from your return, and it’s the same metric used for IBR, ICR, and PAYE. The difference is that IBR is 15% of discretionary income, while ICR is 20%. ICR also does not include forgiveness at the end, so IBR is always better.

This program is relatively easy to qualify for, and it can provide a great deal of value (at $4,000 per year, if it takes you 4 years to complete your undergraduate degree, then you could stand to receive $16,000 in TEACH Grant loans just for your undergraduate education), so it’s more than worth looking into if you’re interested in becoming a teacher.
You can start by looking at our list of the best student loan refinancing lenders, and then picking out the ones that seem like good fits. All these lenders let you check what kind of loan terms you could get through them online in a matter of minutes. You just plug in some of your information, the lender does a soft credit check (which has no impact on your credit score), and then they’ll show you potential loan options.

My wife has over $180k in student loan debt from medical school. I’ve only talked to one company about possibility of some of it being forgiven but they said going through them would actually increase our monthly payment by 100%. Said it was due to her income ($220k) That was unimagineable to me. Could that be correct? Any advice on what kind of specific program I should look in to and what company may be best to help with it? Thanks a lot!

Graduates may refinance any unsubsidized or subsidized Federal or private student loan that was used exclusively for qualified higher education expenses (as defined in 26 USC Section 221) at an accredited U.S. undergraduate or graduate school. Any federal loans refinanced with Lender are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment.


Borrower, and Co-signer if applicable, must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident with a valid I-551 card (which must show a minimum of 10 years between “Resident Since” date and “Card Expires” date or has no expiration date); state that they are of at least borrowing age in the state of residence at the time of application; and meet Lender underwriting criteria (including, for example, employment, debt-to-income, disposable income, and credit history requirements).
My daughter is in a repayment plan for teachers (IBF?) that was told would be forgiven after 10 years. Through the 1st 3 years, with income and dependents, she has had no monthly payment to date. In trying to buy a house the mortgage company wants to use 2% of the outstanding student loan…. $73,000…. in debt to income ratio. $1460/mo is over 40% of her monthly “GROSS”…. she an elementary teacher, not a brain surgeon! The loan shows on her credit report but shows no monthly payment and nothing owed….. its just there.
To ask questions after you have submitted your Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Application and Promissory Note, contact the servicer for your new Direct Consolidation Loan. If you submitted your application online, your consolidation servicer’s contact information was provided at the end of the online process. If you submitted a paper application by U.S. mail, your consolidation servicer’s contact information was available when you downloaded or printed the paper application.
Annual Percentage Rates (APR), loan term and monthly payments are estimated based on analysis of information provided by you, data provided by lenders, and publicly available information. All loan information is presented without warranty, and the estimated APR and other terms are not binding in any way. Lenders provide loans with a range of APRs depending on borrowers' credit and other factors. Keep in mind that only borrowers with excellent credit will qualify for the lowest rate available. Your actual APR will depend on factors like credit score, requested loan amount, loan term, and credit history. All loans are subject to credit review and approval.
Unfortunately, student loan forgiveness programs tend to leave the parents out in the cold. In fact, there are very few options for any sort of recompense for parents and grandparents (or other cosigners) who helped kids pay for college. I think the Government has taken the viewpoint that the kids are being scammed by shady lenders, but that the adults should have known better.
My 25 year old daughter’s student loan from 2011 is in collections. The original loan amount was approximately $7,800.00 and the balance due now is ~ $12,000.00. She is a single mom of one child and earned $13,000.00 last year. They took her 2016 tax refund of $5,000.00 to put towards her loan balance. When she called, they indicated they would accept $5,260.00 to settle and close the loan or she could try to have the loan returned to the Dept. of Education and then determine the best repayment options.
I am an EMT/Firefighter working for a tribal fire and rescue agency. I am also a local volunteer fire fighter. I started my AS in respiratory therapy almost 2 years ago and received Stafford loans. I do not know why they didn’t give me Perkins loans or if it matters. I have a 3.97 GPA and am due to graduate in December with a huge bill. Despite my years of service, good grades and financial need, I have been unable to find scholarships or grants beyond the federal programs. I am trying to be smart about my upcoming student loans and not make mistakes. From all my reading, it seems I would have been better off with Perkins loans, but despite my inquiries to the school… I haven’t received any reason why or information regarding the matter. Any advice?
 I was seventeen no high school diploma failed enrollment testing did not have correct birth date and was told I could enroll for school. They had me sight on two loans when I was Grant accepted. Due to my lack of knowledge I was not aware of what I was signing. I failed my studies and was told I couldn’t graduate with my class because I was pregnant but rather than say I completely failed my course they pushed me into the next graduation class. School closed in 1992 so I was not able to return or retain original school documents.
Next, you can choose what type of interest rate you want when you refinance. Variable-rate student loans can cost you less to start, but there’s the possibility that the interest rate goes up later. As a general rule, a variable-rate loan works well when you only need a couple years to pay off the balance, but you may also want to read more about choosing between fixed and variable student loan refinancing.
Student loans can be expensive. Whether you refinance federal student loans, refinance private student loans or both, you will work with a private lender to refinance student loans. This is because the federal government does not refinance student loans. Lenders want to refinance student loans for borrowers who they believe will repay their student loans.
I went through a state-funded program for vocational rehabilitation. The state’s classified me with a disability but I chose to get rehabilitated rather than go on SSI. Here’s the two part question. Based on this info would I still qualify as disabled even though I don’t collect Ssi ? And second I noticed that the school that the state put me through charged me $27,000 for that six months of training I can’t seem to get proof that I wasn’t supposed to be Billed. I think there’s fraud here but I can’t seem to prove it is there anything I can do in either case?

Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. ‍ All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.19% effective August 10, 2019.
All plans just look at your income from your tax return – so it also depends on how you file (married filing jointly versus married filing separately). That discretionary income is calculated on your AGI from your return, and it’s the same metric used for IBR, ICR, and PAYE. The difference is that IBR is 15% of discretionary income, while ICR is 20%. ICR also does not include forgiveness at the end, so IBR is always better.
I am conflicted bc after reading your articles I feel like it will still make more sense for me to switch plans (in order to pay 10% of income as opposed to 15% monthly and bc I have not paid much off my debt thus far in a few years). However, my family has advised me that I need to see real numbers to know how much I will owe when my loans are forgiven in 25 years when my taxes are due. In my head adding an extra $35k to my $206k balance will be just the same when those taxes are due-seemingly impossible. But it is true that I do not know how to calculate the actual numbers to have a better idea of what kind of added interest the added $35k will make to my total that will be forgiven in 25yrs which I will then owe in taxes.

I’m a little confused. According to Navient, I qualify for an Income-Based Repayment Plan, Income-Sensitive Repayment Plan, or Graduated Repayment Plan (either 2, 3, 4, or maybe 5 years) for my Federal Loans only. I don’t quite understand how the loan forgiveness that you’ve mentioned works for the Income-Based Repayment plan and Income-Sensitive Repayment Plan. For example: If I do the IBR, my monthly payments will be $0. Of course, they can potentially increase since I have to give my AGI each year. Are you saying that my loan is automatically forgiven after 10 years or after my repayment term? Isn’t it better to be paying something on the principal rather than nothing?
I have loans with Navient. I had thought these were federal student loans….but I saw that someone mentioned that they had loans with Sallie Mae (No Navient), and you told them they were private loans and that there is no forgiveness for private loans. ?? Why do my loans at Navient say “Federal Student Loans”?? These are consolidated loans. Are they indeed private? Sorry, this is all so confusing.

In 1994, I started at ITT. I applied for CAD, I thought I was going to take classes for CAD. Then I was told I tested higher in Electronics and I wld make more money in that field. I was 22 at the time, just married and had a child. So, I went with it. I was lied to from the beginning. I was only in the school 3 months at best. I have had hardship most of my adult life. Stuggling to make ends meet. I originally had my loan through William D Ford Direct Loans. I belive my loan was only 2k to start. Now its at 18k. I kept putting on a deferment. I explained about my hardship. This is what was recommended. Now my loan is at Navient..They want me to pay on this for 25 yrs and then they will give me a loan forgiveness. I’ll probably be be dead by then. Is their any way I can get a forgiveness on this loan now?
This program is relatively easy to qualify for, and it can provide a great deal of value (at $4,000 per year, if it takes you 4 years to complete your undergraduate degree, then you could stand to receive $16,000 in TEACH Grant loans just for your undergraduate education), so it’s more than worth looking into if you’re interested in becoming a teacher.
The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program – Nurses have always been able to take advantage of the PSLF program, and for good reason! It was created specifically to help encourage people to take up work in public service positions, and no job defines public service better than that of a Nurse. Any Nurse who holds a full-time, qualifying position will be able to have the entirety of their student loan balance forgiven after they’ve made 10 years worth (120) of monthly payments on their debt, no matter how much is left when that 120th payment is made!

If you want to get approved for a Borrower’s Defense Discharge, then you should call the Student Loan Relief Helpline’s Borrower’s Defense Against Repayment Hotline and pay them to review your situation, help you put together the legal arguments required for your application, and increase the odds that you’ll actually receive an approval after it’s been submitted.
This student loan forgiveness program cancels a percentage of a borrower’s Federal Perkins Loan if they work full-time in an eligible field. You will have a portion of your loans forgiven for each year of service. The specific cancellation terms depend on your line of work, but this program awards up to 100% forgiveness. For the majority of Perkins Loan cancellations, the cancellation terms are as follows:
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