For example, if you have both Direct Loans and other types of federal student loans, and you have been making payments toward PSLF on your Direct Loans, you should not consolidate your Direct Loans along with your other loans. Similarly, if you have Federal Perkins Loans and you are employed in an occupation that would qualify you for Perkins Loan cancellation benefits, you should not include your Perkins Loans when you consolidate. Leaving out your Direct Loans or Perkins Loans will preserve the benefits on those loans.
I have two loans outstanding : 1) original in Jan 1997 from Sallie Mae and 2) original 2012 from Navy Federal. I am a nurse practitioner and cannot figure out how middle class people are supposed to qualify for these federal loan dismissal programs. I have been in graduate school for past 3 years paying as I go along. What is left for me to do to get these paid off or forgiven? Very frustrating to say the least.
Borrower, and Co-signer if applicable, must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident with a valid I-551 card (which must show a minimum of 10 years between “Resident Since” date and “Card Expires” date or has no expiration date); state that they are of at least borrowing age in the state of residence at the time of application; and meet Lender underwriting criteria (including, for example, employment, debt-to-income, disposable income, and credit history requirements).

I went to Everest College for Court Reporting in 2007-2008. I did not graduate, but chose to leave after I slowly realizing I was in real danger of being scammed by the school. How the entire program operated just didn’t seem right, and I didn’t feel that I had been told the truth about the success rate upon graduation, or that my education with them was up to par. However, I had already racked up several federal loans because we were called into student aid every 3-4 weeks in-between classes to renew our loans in order to continue to even the next class that day! After about 10 months I knew I had to leave, but these loan amounts due from that time have persisted. The school was closed in 2015 or 2016 I believe, after I was long gone. Do I qualify for loan dismissal/forgiveness?

LendKey: Refinancing via LendKey.com is only available for applicants with qualified private education loans from an eligible institution. Loans that were used for exam preparation classes, including, but not limited to, loans for LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and GRE preparation, are not eligible for refinancing with a lender via LendKey.com. If you currently have any of these exam preparation loans, you should not include them in an application to refinance your student loans on this website. Applicants must be either U.S. citizens or Permanent Residents in an eligible state to qualify for a loan. Certain membership requirements (including the opening of a share account and any applicable association fees in connection with membership) may apply in the event that an applicant wishes to accept a loan offer from a credit union lender. Lenders participating on LendKey.com reserve the right to modify or discontinue the products, terms, and benefits offered on this website at any time without notice. LendKey Technologies, Inc. is not affiliated with, nor does it endorse, any educational institution.
Hi, Robert. I have two loans, one through Navient that the interest has been paid off on and the principal is down to 16,000. I have another loan for 19,000 through Great Lakes that just went into repayment. Between the two loans my payments are around 350 a month. I’m looking into the IBR but don’t want to start over on a 198-month term since my first loan is from 2003 and I’ve already paid the interest. I also work for a non-profit as an RN so I want to apply for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Is it worth it to start over with a new term?
I have about 325,000 consolidated student loan debt with the fed gov’t once graduated in 2009. I was under the IBR plan but loss of employment and medical bills caused me to go further into debt. I filed Bankruptcy but this did not cover the loans…I have a doctoral degree but have not been able to find anything in my field as a result to make the salary I was previously making. I am working 2 jobs to cover the BK payments plus my normal living expenses. I am wanting to ensure that I am doing everything possible to utilized the forgiveness option at the end of 20-25 years. Any thoughts or recommendations? Am I eligible for PAYE on the 2007??… I never thought I would be in this position and don’t want to be stressed. I have cut my lifestyle down to the bare minimum but it doesn’t seem like I can get ahead…
Hi, Thank you for compiling all of this valuable info into one place. Your website has answered a lot of my questions. I am 90 days past due & was advised to apply for an IBR by my borrower. My question is I should be approved for an $0 payment due to being unemployed. Should I file taxes at all, with my husband as a dependent or how can we handle the tax aspect so we can keep our heads above water?
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Your best option would be to find a way to qualify for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, which offers total forgiveness after just TEN years of payments (instead of the typical 20). To qualify for PSLF, you’ll need to work for the Government, a Non-Profit, or some other position that is included on the eligibility guidelines. See my page on the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (linked above) for a breakdown of the details.

I finished grad school with about 50k in federal direct loans. I immediately went to work in a non profit and enrolled in IBR repayment plan. I paid on this for about 5 years which left me owing about 80k. At the time I was not concerned because I figured I would remain in the same field for at least 10 years and would be eligible for forgiveness. However, I got a new job in the private sector last year, nearly tripling y salary. I switched to standard repayment plan and have paid down my loan aggressively and am now back down to about 45k. My fixed interest rate is 6.5%. I plan to pay off the remainder in the next year (barring any catastrophic events). My question is — is my best bet to just continue (over) paying my loans on this current plan or do I have any other options? Am I able to pay them off with a private loan that has a lower interest rate? Thanks so much for your help!
Through my current employer, many of the other therapists have applied for and have been awarded loan forgiveness monies through the National Health Services Corps (NHSC) Loan Repayment Program. As I understand it, these two programs work differently and I am trying to figure out whether or not they can be used simultaneously. The NHSC information says that I can’t have another “service obligation” or that service obligation needs to be finished, terminated, completed by the application deadline.
“Obama Student Loan Forgiveness” is a nickname for the William D. Ford Direct Loan program. The name came about when President Obama reformed part of the Direct Loan program in 2010 by signing the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.  As a result of expanded funding for federal student loans, more borrowers gained access to more options with loan repayment.
Borrower, and Co-signer if applicable, must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident with a valid I-551 card (which must show a minimum of 10 years between “Resident Since” date and “Card Expires” date or has no expiration date); state that they are of at least borrowing age in the state of residence at the time of application; and meet Lender underwriting criteria (including, for example, employment, debt-to-income, disposable income, and credit history requirements).
Education Refinance Loan Rate Disclosure: Variable rate, based on the one-month London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) published in The Wall Street Journal on the twenty-fifth day, or the next business day, of the preceding calendar month. As of October 1, 2019, the one-month LIBOR rate is 2.05%. Variable interest rates range from 2.25% – 9.24% (3.25% – 9.24% APR) and will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a cosigner. Fixed interest rates range from 3.45% – 9.49% (3.45% – 9.49% APR) based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a cosigner. Lowest rates shown are for eligible, creditworthy applicants with a graduate level degree, require a 5-year repayment term and include our Loyalty discount and Automatic Payment discounts of 0.25 percentage points each, as outlined in the Loyalty and Automatic Payment Discount disclosures. The maximum variable rate on the Education Refinance Loan is the greater of 21.00% or Prime Rate plus 9.00%. Subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change. Please note: Due to federal regulations, Citizens Bank is required to provide every potential borrower with disclosure information before they apply for a private student loan. The borrower will be presented with an Application Disclosure and an Approval Disclosure within the application process before they accept the terms and conditions of their loan. Loyalty Discount Disclosure: The borrower will be eligible for a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction on their loan if the borrower or their co-signer (if applicable) has a qualifying account in existence with us at the time the borrower and their co-signer (if applicable) have submitted a completed application authorizing us to review their credit request for the loan. The following are qualifying accounts: any checking account, savings account, money market account, certificate of deposit, automobile loan, home equity loan, home equity line of credit, mortgage, credit card account, or other student loans owned by Citizens Bank, N.A. Please note, our checking and savings account options are only available in the following states: CT, DE, MA, MI, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, and VT and some products may have an associated cost. This discount will be reflected in the interest rate disclosed in the Loan Approval Disclosure that will be provided to the borrower once the loan is approved. Limit of one Loyalty Discount per loan and discount will not be applied to prior loans. The Loyalty Discount will remain in effect for the life of the loan. Automatic Payment Discount Disclosure: Borrowers will be eligible to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction on their student loans owned by Citizens Bank, N.A. during such time as payments are required to be made and our loan servicer is authorized to automatically deduct payments each month from any bank account the borrower designates. Discount is not available when payments are not due, such as during forbearance. If our loan servicer is unable to successfully withdraw the automatic deductions from the designated account three or more times within any 12-month period, the borrower will no longer be eligible for this discount.
Education Refinance Loan Rate Disclosure: Variable rate, based on the one-month London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") published in The Wall Street Journal on the twenty-fifth day, or the next business day, of the preceding calendar month. As of September 1, 2019, the one-month LIBOR rate is 2.14%. Variable interest rates range from 2.34%-9.33%(2.34%-9.33% APR) and will fluctuate over the term of the borrower's loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. Fixed interest rates range from 3.45%- 9.49% (3.45%- 9.49% APR) based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. Lowest rates shown are for eligible, creditworthy applicants with a graduate level degree, require a 5-year repayment term and include our Loyalty discount and Automatic Payment discounts of 0.25 percentage points each, as outlined in the Loyalty and Automatic Payment Discount disclosures. The maximum variable rate on the Education Refinance Loan is the greater of 21.00% or Prime Rate plus 9.00%. Subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change. Please note: Due to federal regulations, Citizens Bank is required to provide every potential borrower with disclosure information before they apply for a private student loan. The borrower will be presented with an Application Disclosure and an Approval Disclosure within the application process before they accept the terms and conditions of their loan...

Sadly, you’re not missing anything except you could have been more aggressive with certifying your income on an IBR program earlier. IBR will end after 25 years from when you started making payments under IBR as long as you never defaulted on the loan during that time (even with the forbearance). Have you called your lender to see when your 25 years is up? It could be 2018 based on a 1993 loan consolidation and being on IBR the entire time. However, if you didn’t start IBR until 2010 (it was hard to follow your timeline), then it will be over in 2035.


If you have Federal loans, an income-based repayment plan can really help make your loans affordable. But yes, it does take a long time to pay them off. The other option is to work/earn more. $14,000 really isn’t much student loan debt (even though it might feel like it). You could pay that off in about 5 years if you can find an extra $200 per month to pay towards it.
4This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a refi borrower with a Full Principal & Interest Repayment and a 10-year repayment term, has a $40,000 loan and a 5.5% Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $434.11 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $52,092.61. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary.
Perkins loan cancellation. Borrowers with federal Perkins loans can have up to 100% of their loans canceled if they work in a public service job for five years. In many cases, approved borrowers will see a percentage of their loans discharged incrementally for each year worked. The Perkins loan teacher benefit is for teachers who work full time in a low-income public school or who teach qualifying subjects, such as special education, math, science or a foreign language.
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