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I have been very impressed with my application process with LendKey! Their customer service team is prompt in responding to any inquiries via email and very helpful on the phone! The application process was easy to follow and very user friendly! With LendKey's help, I'll be saving nearly $400 per month on my student loans! I'm absolutely thrilled and feel like I can breathe again knowing how much this is going to help me financially and the ability to pay my loans off faster. Thank you LendKey!

Education Refinance Loan Rate Disclosure: Variable rate, based on the one-month London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") published in The Wall Street Journal on the twenty-fifth day, or the next business day, of the preceding calendar month. As of September 1, 2019, the one-month LIBOR rate is 2.14%. Variable interest rates range from 2.34%-9.33%(2.34%-9.33% APR) and will fluctuate over the term of the borrower's loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. Fixed interest rates range from 3.45%- 9.49% (3.45%- 9.49% APR) based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. Lowest rates shown are for eligible, creditworthy applicants with a graduate level degree, require a 5-year repayment term and include our Loyalty discount and Automatic Payment discounts of 0.25 percentage points each, as outlined in the Loyalty and Automatic Payment Discount disclosures. The maximum variable rate on the Education Refinance Loan is the greater of 21.00% or Prime Rate plus 9.00%. Subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change. Please note: Due to federal regulations, Citizens Bank is required to provide every potential borrower with disclosure information before they apply for a private student loan. The borrower will be presented with an Application Disclosure and an Approval Disclosure within the application process before they accept the terms and conditions of their loan...
Splash Financial: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.50% APR to 7.03% APR and Variable Rates range from 2.43% APR to 7.76% APR. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. Fixed rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 6.49% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.59% to 6.54% for a 8-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.79% per year to 6.59% per year for a 12-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). Variable rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 3.69% per year to 5.72% per year for a 8-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.47% per year to 6.36% per year for a 12-year term, 4.50% per year to 7.76% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. Variable interest rates will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. The maximum variable rate on the student refinance loan is 9.00% for 5-year, 7-year, 8-year and 10-year terms, and 10.00% for 12-year, 15-year and 20-year terms. The floor rate is 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.
Co-signer Release: Borrowers may apply for co-signer release after making 36 consecutive on-time payments of principal and interest. For the purpose of the application for co-signer release, on-time payments are defined as payments received within 15 days of the due date. Interest only payments do not qualify. The borrower must meet certain credit and eligibility guidelines when applying for the co-signer release. Borrowers must complete an application for release and provide income verification documents as part of the review. Borrowers who use deferment or forbearance will need to make 36 consecutive on-time payments after reentering repayment to qualify for release. The borrower applying for co-signer release must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. If an application for co-signer release is denied, the borrower may not reapply for co-signer release until at least one year from the date the application for co-signer release was received. Terms and conditions apply. Borrowers whose loans were funded prior to reaching the age of majority may not be eligible for co-signer release. Note: co-signer release is not available on the Student Loan for Parents or Education Refinance Loan for Parents.
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For example: if you elect to have the National Service Trust send $1,000 of your education award towards payment on a Direct Loan, and under your repayment plan you are expected to pay $100 each month, your education award payment would count as 10 payments towards PSLF, and you would not owe another payment for 10 months from the date the lump sum payment was applied.

I would recommend you call the for-profit company called the Student Loan Relief Helpline. Please do note that this is not a free service, and it’s not a Government Service, but a profit-driven organization that helps people reduce their monthly payments and find out how to qualify for loan forgiveness benefits. You can reach them here: 1-888-694-8235.
my loans are 72k and 3.5%. I am currently enrolled for the last two years under public service loan forgiveness. I do not qualify for IBR and am in the process of applying for PAYE. I have been paying my loans since 2007 but only under the PSLF since 2014. My question is..Is it worth it to stay under PSLF for another 8 years or switch back to a graduated payment plan for another 10 years that will give me lower payments. Which plan will result in the most loan forgiveness.
Loyalty Discount Disclosure:The borrower will be eligible for a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction on their loan if the borrower or their co-signer (if applicable) has a qualifying account in existence with us at the time the borrower and their co-signer (if applicable) have submitted a completed application authorizing us to review their credit request for the loan. The following are qualifying accounts: any checking account, savings account, money market account, certificate of deposit, automobile loan, home equity loan, home equity line of credit, mortgage, credit card account, or other student loans owned by Citizens Bank, N.A. Please note, our checking and savings account options are only available in the following states: CT, DE, MA, MI, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, and VT and some products may have an associated cost. This discount will be reflected in the interest rate disclosed in the Loan Approval Disclosure that will be provided to the borrower once the loan is approved. Limit of one Loyalty Discount per loan and discount will not be applied to prior loans. The Loyalty Discount will remain in effect for the life of the loan.

 I was seventeen no high school diploma failed enrollment testing did not have correct birth date and was told I could enroll for school. They had me sight on two loans when I was Grant accepted. Due to my lack of knowledge I was not aware of what I was signing. I failed my studies and was told I couldn’t graduate with my class because I was pregnant but rather than say I completely failed my course they pushed me into the next graduation class. School closed in 1992 so I was not able to return or retain original school documents.
I am an EMT/Firefighter working for a tribal fire and rescue agency. I am also a local volunteer fire fighter. I started my AS in respiratory therapy almost 2 years ago and received Stafford loans. I do not know why they didn’t give me Perkins loans or if it matters. I have a 3.97 GPA and am due to graduate in December with a huge bill. Despite my years of service, good grades and financial need, I have been unable to find scholarships or grants beyond the federal programs. I am trying to be smart about my upcoming student loans and not make mistakes. From all my reading, it seems I would have been better off with Perkins loans, but despite my inquiries to the school… I haven’t received any reason why or information regarding the matter. Any advice?

Your credit score is a barometer of your financial responsibility. Most lenders evaluate your credit score (or its underlying components), and want to ensure that you meet your financial obligations and have a history of on-time payments. Generally, top lenders expect a minimum credit score in the mid to high 600's, while others do not have a minimum.
I currently have done 1 year in the Army Reserve after doing 5 years in the Air National Guard. I haven’t received a bonus from the Army because I was not eligible for any. Is there a program like the PSLF for people in the Guard/Reserve since we’re technically federal/DoD employees?? I was in school to be a pilot which ran me up to about $90,000 total…I enlisted to the Air National Guard where they did blood work to find out I have a Sickle Cell Trait and cannot fly unpressurized aircraft(hence cannot go through flight training). I pretty much wasted my time with school. I cannot file bankruptcy either or I’ll be discharged from the Army Reserve. Please Help!!!!
My wife has over $180k in student loan debt from medical school. I’ve only talked to one company about possibility of some of it being forgiven but they said going through them would actually increase our monthly payment by 100%. Said it was due to her income ($220k) That was unimagineable to me. Could that be correct? Any advice on what kind of specific program I should look in to and what company may be best to help with it? Thanks a lot!
The sooner you refinance, the more you could save. The longer you hold your loan at a higher rate, the more interest you are accruing—even if you are in a grace period. That being said, you must be employed or possess a job offer to be eligible to refinance with Earnest. The more your financial situation has improved since you took out the loans originally, the better your refinancing offer will be.
I have two loans outstanding : 1) original in Jan 1997 from Sallie Mae and 2) original 2012 from Navy Federal. I am a nurse practitioner and cannot figure out how middle class people are supposed to qualify for these federal loan dismissal programs. I have been in graduate school for past 3 years paying as I go along. What is left for me to do to get these paid off or forgiven? Very frustrating to say the least.
Savings calculations are based on refinancing $121,825 in student loans at an existing loan servicer’s interest rate of 7.5% fixed APR with 10 years, 6 months remaining on the loan term. The other lender’s savings and APR (light green line) represent what would happen if those loans were refinanced at the other lender’s best fixed APRs. The Earnest savings and APR (white line) represent refinancing those loans at Earnest’s best fixed APRs.
In short, refinancing student loans generally does not hurt your credit. When getting your initial rate estimate, all that’s required is a ’soft credit inquiry,’ which doesn’t affect your credit score at all. Once you determine which lender has the best offer (Earnest, we hope), you’ll complete a full application. This application does require a ‘hard credit inquiry,’ which can have a minor credit impact (typically a few points). However, in the months and years after refinancing, your credit score should see steady improvement as you make on-time payments and pay down your debt.
Splash Financial: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.50% APR to 7.03% APR and Variable Rates range from 2.43% APR to 7.76% APR. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. Fixed rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 6.49% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.59% to 6.54% for a 8-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.79% per year to 6.59% per year for a 12-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). Variable rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 3.69% per year to 5.72% per year for a 8-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.47% per year to 6.36% per year for a 12-year term, 4.50% per year to 7.76% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. Variable interest rates will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. The maximum variable rate on the student refinance loan is 9.00% for 5-year, 7-year, 8-year and 10-year terms, and 10.00% for 12-year, 15-year and 20-year terms. The floor rate is 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.
Earnest fixed rate loan rates range from 3.45% APR (with Auto Pay) to 6.99% APR (with Auto Pay). Variable rate loan rates range from 2.05% APR (with Auto Pay) to 6.49% APR (with Auto Pay). For variable rate loans, although the interest rate will vary after you are approved, the interest rate will never exceed 8.95% for loan terms 10 years or less. For loan terms of 10 years to 15 years, the interest rate will never exceed 9.95%. For loan terms over 15 years, the interest rate will never exceed 11.95% (the maximum rates for these loans). Earnest variable interest rate loans are based on a publicly available index, the one month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR). Your rate will be calculated each month by adding a margin between 1.82% and 5.50% to the one month LIBOR. The rate will not increase more than once per month. Earnest rate ranges are current as of October 11, 2019, and are subject to change based on market conditions and borrower eligibility.
I have two loans outstanding : 1) original in Jan 1997 from Sallie Mae and 2) original 2012 from Navy Federal. I am a nurse practitioner and cannot figure out how middle class people are supposed to qualify for these federal loan dismissal programs. I have been in graduate school for past 3 years paying as I go along. What is left for me to do to get these paid off or forgiven? Very frustrating to say the least.
Do student loans ever “expire”? I have about $ 11,000 in student loans from 1984-1988 from before we were married. They were consolidated around 1998. I have been a stay at home mom since 1993. We now have 8 kids, Our budget has always been tight, & although we will have my husbands student loans paid off in 2 years, there never has been enough extra to make consistent payments on mine. My loans have have been in & out of forbearance, deferment, rehabilitation, etc. They have been in default (again) for some time. Last year they took our income tax return. Now the collection compay is suggesting another rehabilitation – but I am a stay at home mom and don’t expect to ever have my “own” income. Is my husband obligated to pay my loans from his salary? Can they put a lien on our home? Should I be even considering signing these rehab forms? They want to set us up on a year of monthly payments I am not even sure we can meet. And after the loan is rehabilitated & some other company buys it I am sure our payments will increase. I feel like I am lying by agreeing to make these payments, as I am not sure we can. What should I do? – Thank you!
Im so happy I found your site. I need help. I owe $270,000 in student loans from medical school. $60,000 of it is from private loans. Both my subsidized and unsubsidized federal loans have been in repayment for 10 years. My balance has actually gone up approx. $25,000. Due to interest and two short term forebearances. I discovered IBR plan last year and qualified, but this year i will not qualify. Im stuck and feel like I will be paying this well beyond retirement years. Im 40 yrs old.
Once you apply, it can take from 30 to 45 days to process. During that time, we complete the credit review process, you (and your cosigner, if applicable) will sign the loan documents and we will ask you to obtain payoff statements from your current loan servicers. If you prefer, we can schedule a call with you and your current loan servicer(s) to verify the loans you want to consolidate.
Your best option would be to find a way to qualify for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, which offers total forgiveness after just TEN years of payments (instead of the typical 20). To qualify for PSLF, you’ll need to work for the Government, a Non-Profit, or some other position that is included on the eligibility guidelines. See my page on the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (linked above) for a breakdown of the details.
Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan and Education Refinance Loan for Parents Eligibility: For the Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan and Education Refinance Loan for Parents, primary borrowers must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or resident alien with a valid U.S. Social Security Number residing in the United States. Resident aliens must apply with a co-signer who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The co-signer (if applicable) must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident with a valid U.S. Social Security Number residing in the United States. For applicants who have not reached the age of majority in their state of residence, a co-signer will be required and may not be eligible for co-signer release. For the Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan, applicants may not be currently enrolled in school and applicants with an Associate’s degree, or with no degree, must have made at least 12 qualifying payments after leaving school. Qualifying payments are the most recent on time and consecutive payments of principal and interest on the loans being refinanced.  Citizens Bank observes the right to modify or discontinue these benefits at any time. Both Education Refinance Loans and Education Refinance Loan for Parents are subject to credit qualification, completion of a loan application/consumer credit agreement, verification of application information, certification of borrower’s student loan amount(s) and highest degree earned or affordability, as applicable. The minimum student loan refinance amount is $10,000. Some federal student loans include unique benefits that the borrower may not receive with a private student loan, some of which we do not offer with the Education Refinance Loan. Borrowers should carefully review their current benefits, especially if they work in public service, are in the military, are currently on or considering income based repayment options or are concerned about a steady source of future income. For more information about federal student loan benefits and federal loan consolidation, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/. Resources are available to help the borrower make a decision, including a comparison of federal and private student loan benefits, at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/types/loans/federal-vs-private.
It depends on where you work today and what type of loans you have. It’s not about your school or what you did or didn’t do. Do you work in public service? Do you have Federal loans? If so, you’ll likely qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. If you have Federal loans, you’ll likely qualify for one of the repayment plans above that includes forgiveness.
Refinancing federal student loans means you turn them private. As a result, you lose access to federal programs, such as income-driven repayment and Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Some private lenders offer help if you run into financial hardship, but this varies by lender. If you’re relying on federal protections, then you should not refinance your federal student loans. But if you’re comfortable sacrificing these programs, refinancing could be a smart strategy for paying off your loans.
I’ve been making about $200 payments on my combined 2 private loans and $0 payments on my Direct/Stafford loans under the Income Driven Repayment plan for about 5 years now. Every year I have to send my information to renew the plan before I’m charged $500+ a month. So I’m a bit confused about how after the payment plan ends the loan will be forgiven. Am I missing some fine print somewhere?
Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan Eligibility: Eligible applicants may not be currently enrolled. Applicants with an Associate’s degree or with no degree must have made at least 12 qualifying payments after leaving school. Qualifying payments are the most recent on time and consecutive payments of principal and interest on the loans being refinanced. Primary borrowers must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or resident alien with a valid U.S. Social Security Number residing in the United States. Resident aliens must apply with a co-signer who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The co-signer (if applicable) must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident with a valid U.S. Social Security Number residing in the United States. For applicants who have not attained the age of majority in their state of residence, a co-signer will be required.  Citizens Bank reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at anytime. Interest rate ranges subject to change. Education Refinance Loans are subject to credit qualification, completion of a loan application/consumer credit agreement, verification of application information, certification of borrower’s student loan amount(s) and highest degree earned.
For example, if you have both Direct Loans and other types of federal student loans, and you have been making payments toward PSLF on your Direct Loans, you should not consolidate your Direct Loans along with your other loans. Similarly, if you have Federal Perkins Loans and you are employed in an occupation that would qualify you for Perkins Loan cancellation benefits, you should not include your Perkins Loans when you consolidate. Leaving out your Direct Loans or Perkins Loans will preserve the benefits on those loans.
So i have about $65k in federal loans and $20k in private student loan debt. I have worked for a non-profit for over 9 years and I had hopes that I would qualify for student loan forgiveness after getting confirmation that my employer was a certified employer under the student loan forgiveness program. Well it turns out i’ve made over 10 years of payments and i was on the wrong payment plan and i also consolidated in 2016 so i have to start all over with the 120 payments. I don’t plan to work here for another 10 years so i am extremely disappointed i didn’t know this information earlier. I now switched to IBR and my payments are $0. It’s my understanding that under IBR your payments are forgiven after 25 years. So since i’ve made over 10 years of payments already (under another payment plan) does this count towards the 25 years or does it start all over since i just got on IBR? I guess i want to know when my 25 year mark would be.
I would just like to acknowledge your continued support and communication to the people who come to this site in search of answers – sometimes desperate, usually in despair, or incredibly stressed how to unearth the mountain of debt they’re under (including myself). I see this long thread of messages and I am astounded by your commitment to help nearly everyone that shares their story. So, short story long, THANK YOU for your work in bringing people direction, comfort, and help when they have no where else to turn. Even if you don’t receive much thanks, you are very much appreciated.

For details on how this program works, you definitely need to visit my page on the Borrower’s Defense Against Repayment Program, but because the system is so complicated, and can take so long to get an approval or denial response, this is one situation where I recommend that EVERYONE hires a student loan expert for assistance in preparing the application.
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