FFEL Consolidation Loan to use the no accrual of interest benefit for active duty service members, which states that you’re not required to pay the interest that accrues during periods of qualifying active duty military service (for up to 60 months) on the portion of a Direct Consolidation Loan that repaid a Direct Loan Program or FFEL Program loan first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008.

I came across your blog in my pursuit of refinancing my student loans which I consolidated back in 1999. I currently have a consolidated subsidized loan with approximately $25k outstanding, and a consolidated unsubsidized loan with approximately $35k outstanding. Both loans have a fixed rate of 7.25%. If it’s relevant, the owner of both loans is Keybank, and both loans are guaranteed by PHEAA. To my understanding, I have not been paying the loans back pursuant to any specific payment plan (e.g., IBR, PAYE, graduated repayment plan, etc.), but on a regular monthly payment plan amortized over a 30 year period. I took advantage of the deferment option for two (2) years in the past, and at my current interest rate and payment amount, I’m estimated to pay the loans off in 2032. My question to you is “Can my loans be forgiven in the 25 year period that I have read about in your blog?” If so, when would the 25 year period have begun for determining when my loans will be forgiven? If my loans are not able to be forgiven, what are my options if any (other than refinancing the loans to lower the interest rate)?
So i have about $65k in federal loans and $20k in private student loan debt. I have worked for a non-profit for over 9 years and I had hopes that I would qualify for student loan forgiveness after getting confirmation that my employer was a certified employer under the student loan forgiveness program. Well it turns out i’ve made over 10 years of payments and i was on the wrong payment plan and i also consolidated in 2016 so i have to start all over with the 120 payments. I don’t plan to work here for another 10 years so i am extremely disappointed i didn’t know this information earlier. I now switched to IBR and my payments are $0. It’s my understanding that under IBR your payments are forgiven after 25 years. So since i’ve made over 10 years of payments already (under another payment plan) does this count towards the 25 years or does it start all over since i just got on IBR? I guess i want to know when my 25 year mark would be.
Refinancing via LendKey.com is only available for applicants with qualified private education loans from an eligible institution. Loans that were used for exam preparation classes, including, but not limited to, loans for LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and GRE preparation, are not eligible for refinancing with a lender via LendKey.com. If you currently have any of these exam preparation loans, you should not include them in an application to refinance your student loans on this website. Applicants must be either U.S. citizens or Permanent Residents in an eligible state to qualify for a loan. Certain membership requirements (including the opening of a share account and any applicable association fees in connection with membership) may apply in the event that an applicant wishes to accept a loan offer from a credit union lender. Lenders participating on LendKey.com reserve the right to modify or discontinue the products, terms, and benefits offered on this website at any time without notice. LendKey Technologies, Inc. is not affiliated with, nor does it endorse, any educational institution.
For example: if you elect to have the National Service Trust send $1,000 of your education award towards payment on a Direct Loan, and under your repayment plan you are expected to pay $100 each month, your education award payment would count as 10 payments towards PSLF, and you would not owe another payment for 10 months from the date the lump sum payment was applied.

I have loans before 2007. My lender advised that I go through REPAYE. Because I’m getting married in 2016, I’d rather go under PAYE (in order to file married but seperate). If I consolidate my loans (which I’ve also been advised to do perhaps because some are Stafford and REPAYE doesn’t cover those???), would I then qualify for PAYE? What other benefits/consquences are there to consolidating loans?
I have been forbearing my loans and on my credit report for the last couple of years shows that my payments have been made on time. As of the last couple of years I haven’t worked due to pregnancy and staying at home caring for our child. I’m not married, but my significant other does claim our children and myself. If I qualify for the $0 repayment plan, will he be responsible for the remaining balance at the end of the loan terms? Since he claims me on his taxes, is it possible for them to go after him?
Refinancing federal student loans means you turn them private. As a result, you lose access to federal programs, such as income-driven repayment and Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Some private lenders offer help if you run into financial hardship, but this varies by lender. If you’re relying on federal protections, then you should not refinance your federal student loans. But if you’re comfortable sacrificing these programs, refinancing could be a smart strategy for paying off your loans.
I’m concerned about changes in loan information and the status of civil service enrollment. It appears purported loan was sold to Navient but the balances don’t match and there is no original balance, lender or name of school. When I went to get job training I was denied because the government had no record of my civil service registration from the 80’s. In order to get student loans this was necessary. I paid off loans from my BA but loans from private technical college have the issues. Can I have Navient verify the debt and address civil service and training issues?

Note: Servicing for this program is managed by another federal student loan servicer. If you enroll in Public Service Loan Forgiveness, your eligible loans will be transferred from Great Lakes to that servicer. Also note, you may not receive a benefit for the same qualifying payments or period of service for Teacher Loan Forgiveness and Public Service Loan Forgiveness.


I’m concerned about changes in loan information and the status of civil service enrollment. It appears purported loan was sold to Navient but the balances don’t match and there is no original balance, lender or name of school. When I went to get job training I was denied because the government had no record of my civil service registration from the 80’s. In order to get student loans this was necessary. I paid off loans from my BA but loans from private technical college have the issues. Can I have Navient verify the debt and address civil service and training issues?
You’ll have to evaluate your situation to decide whether refinancing federal student loans is a wise decision. For example, if you work in the public sector and could qualify for loan forgiveness in the future, you’d typically be better off keeping your federal loans. On the other hand, if you don’t work in the public sector and you’ve had no problems making your loan payments to date, then you may want to go ahead and refinance to save money on interest.
My navient and nelnet government student loans are both in hardship deferments. If I consolidate these two student loans when my deferments end in june, this month, 2019, and July next month 2019, will this new consolidated student loan qualify for ibr and the 20 and 25-year undergrad and grad student loan forgiveness? My student loan debt exceeds my own income at this time so much that my monthly payment will be set at $0. However, I filed a joint return with my husband this year, so if I go on ibr this year, my monthly payment will not be $0 but based on both my husband’s (primary income) and mine ($12,000 per year). Our debts are such that we cannot afford the ibr payments based on our joint income tax filing for this year. If I fail to make any payments on either student loan once my deferments end this month, in June and next month in July, until the new 2020 tax year, so in Feb and March 2020, can I then just file separately and qualify for the ibr $0 monthly payment? I just wonder (am terrified) of what will happen in the 7-month period when I’m not making any payments; should I let my student loan lenders know my situation? If I miss 7 payments, so not yet defaulting, will i still qualify for ibr after these missed payments? Thank you for your help; I sometimes want to jump off a bridge when I see that terrifying student loan debt total.
I just wanted to comment on how dedicated you are to helping people Robert. You have provided prompt clear responses, with impressive information to every single person who commented on your article. I will share this with friends. I was fortunate to be in healthcare/non-profit & have a Perkins loan that was forgiven after 5 years. Thank you for your dedication to your field & being such an amazing person to give your time to answer all these questions. Kudos to you!
I’m a little confused. According to Navient, I qualify for an Income-Based Repayment Plan, Income-Sensitive Repayment Plan, or Graduated Repayment Plan (either 2, 3, 4, or maybe 5 years) for my Federal Loans only. I don’t quite understand how the loan forgiveness that you’ve mentioned works for the Income-Based Repayment plan and Income-Sensitive Repayment Plan. For example: If I do the IBR, my monthly payments will be $0. Of course, they can potentially increase since I have to give my AGI each year. Are you saying that my loan is automatically forgiven after 10 years or after my repayment term? Isn’t it better to be paying something on the principal rather than nothing?
I make about 35k (my wife also makes about 38k — my wife and I file married but separate taxes — we have 3 kids.) I feel lost. I don’t know how I got so deep or how this got so out of control. Any help is appreciated. Do you think I qualify for these repayment programs? Which would be best for such an old defaulted loan? Is there a place (other than the collection agency) that can help guide me? Again I sincerely appreciate your article and advice.
Moving your loans to a private lender or grouping your government debt with a new federal loan servicer could be the turning point of your repayment. If you’re unsure which route to take, consider scenarios when refinancing makes sense or whether consolidation would be wise in your case. In the end, the best decision is the one that’s best for you.
I always recommend an income-based repayment plan if you need it. It just makes the most sense. And borrowers shouldn’t worry about the election – if anything changes, history tells us that it will just impact future borrowers, not existing ones. Each new payment plan, forgiveness program, etc. typically isn’t retro-active, but rather only impacts loans that originate in this year.
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