Finally, where is all the money going? I get that your payments are a lot of money each month, but your husband makes a really good income, and you didn’t say, but with that much debt I would guess you have your masters and earn at least $50k per year. That’s $185,000 per year – after taxes you should still be bringing in $11,500. After his child support you should still be at $10,000 or so per month. A big house, food for all the kids, clothes, etc, maybe costs you $6,000 per month (and that’s being very generous). Where’s the other $4,000 going? Something is not adding up here.

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program – Nurses have always been able to take advantage of the PSLF program, and for good reason! It was created specifically to help encourage people to take up work in public service positions, and no job defines public service better than that of a Nurse. Any Nurse who holds a full-time, qualifying position will be able to have the entirety of their student loan balance forgiven after they’ve made 10 years worth (120) of monthly payments on their debt, no matter how much is left when that 120th payment is made!


I would just like to acknowledge your continued support and communication to the people who come to this site in search of answers – sometimes desperate, usually in despair, or incredibly stressed how to unearth the mountain of debt they’re under (including myself). I see this long thread of messages and I am astounded by your commitment to help nearly everyone that shares their story. So, short story long, THANK YOU for your work in bringing people direction, comfort, and help when they have no where else to turn. Even if you don’t receive much thanks, you are very much appreciated.
Refinancing student loans makes sense for many people if they are eligible. For starters, student loan consolidation (which is included in the student loan refinancing process) simplifies the management of your monthly payments. Refinancing allows you to consolidate both your federal and private loans, select a repayment term that makes sense for you, and often lower your interest rate. Here at Earnest, the entire application process is online, and you could have your new low interest rate loan in less than a week.

Great info here. Hoping you can help me a bit. I have about $92,000 left in FFEL standard consolidation loan (consolidated 8/04) plus another roughly $120,000 in private student loans (college and medical school) and $50,000 of wife’s school loans. Interest rates aren’t bad, but if there is a path toward loan forgiveness it would make life much easier.
I was hoping you could clear up some terminology for me. I have two types of loans (“FFEL Stafford Subsidized” and “FFEL Stafford unsubsidized”) which have been consolidated in to two “FFEL consolidated” loans. Is it true that any time I see the term FFEL that means it’s not direct and does not qualify for PSLF? I thought I understood this, but on the studentaid.ed.gov in the glossary it says: “Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans are sometimes called “’Stafford Loans’.” That makes it sound like any Stafford loan is a direct loan.

You’re mixing up two different things. Graduated Repayment is a repayment plan that DOESN’T have forgiveness, but you can qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) anyway. As long as you can certify your last 4 years of employment (might take you tracking down some HR people), you can qualify. Simply fill out the certification form here: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service


Second, typically any changes made to repayment plans will keep you grandfathered in. Congress can’t phase out PSLF simply by de-funding it. They actually have to pass legislation to change it, and any retroactive changes will likely fail (both to pass, and if it does pass, will likely die in court). We can’t guarantee that, but it’s what will likely happen in our opinion.
I am an EMT/Firefighter working for a tribal fire and rescue agency. I am also a local volunteer fire fighter. I started my AS in respiratory therapy almost 2 years ago and received Stafford loans. I do not know why they didn’t give me Perkins loans or if it matters. I have a 3.97 GPA and am due to graduate in December with a huge bill. Despite my years of service, good grades and financial need, I have been unable to find scholarships or grants beyond the federal programs. I am trying to be smart about my upcoming student loans and not make mistakes. From all my reading, it seems I would have been better off with Perkins loans, but despite my inquiries to the school… I haven’t received any reason why or information regarding the matter. Any advice?
Federal Loan vs. Private Loan Benefits: Some federal student loans include unique benefits that the borrower may not receive with a private student loan, some of which we do not offer with the Education Refinance Loan. Borrowers should carefully review their current benefits, especially if they work in public service, are in the military, are currently on or considering income based repayment options or are concerned about a steady source of future income and would want to lower their payments at some time in the future. When the borrower refinances, they waive any current and potential future benefits of their federal loans and replace those with the benefits of the Education Refinance Loan. For more information about federal student loan benefits and federal loan consolidation, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/. We also have several resources available to help the borrower make a decision at http://www.citizensbank.com/EdRefinance,including Should I Refinance My Student Loans? and our FAQs. Should I Refinance My Student Loans? includes a comparison of federal and private student loan benefits that we encourage the borrower to review.
My father was a policeman, killed in the line of duty, when I was fifteen years old. I am the oldest of six children. We have not had the help of a faher or mother to make things easier through my husband’s layoffs, etc. With three children I got tired of our financial sinking so, unfortunately, decided to go to college to make things better. At age 50 I received my bachelor’s degree, and graduated Magna Cum Laude. After being used and abused as a substitute for over 10 years, I could see I was too old and didn’t have a “rich” name to get in. Finally, I decided they could not stop me from making more income, so I drove 110 miles a day into a snow belt to college and worked two part time jobs, as I suffered through the stress of getting a Master’s Degree in Education. I worked for awhile as an adjunct professor and am now retired at 70. I still owe about $11,000 at the ridiculous rate of 6.25%. I have had deferments, but paid ahead when I could, to stay in good grace with Nelnet. Is there any chance of a loan forgiveness now that my retirement is only $380.00 a month, plus monthly social security of $700.00??? Could I get a forgiveness since I have been paying since 1998 and/or because my father was a policeman killed in the line of duty(and an army veteran)? (The original two loans were serviced through the bank and then given to Nelnet [which I did not authorize??]. I paid off my Master’s degree loan first because the loan was less, but the interest was higher.)
Private student loan lenders want to ensure that you have sufficient income to repay your student loans. Lenders want proof that you have stable and recurring monthly income and cash flow. Examine your pay stubs and identify your after-tax monthly income. When you subtract your proposed monthly student loan payments, does a sufficient amount remain for other essential living expenses?
My advice for you is to first sign up for one of the Income-Based Student Loan Repayment Plans so that your monthly payments are dropped to an affordable amount, then get on the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (I think your status as a Reservist on permanent active duty will qualify, but you’ll have to double check on that), which will allow you to get your loans discharged after making payments for a set number of years, no matter how much debt remains.
I graduated back in 1991. In 92 or 93 I consolidated about $23,000 dollars in student debt with Sallie Mae. Over the next several years I had to do Forbearance a few times but by 2008 I had made about $51,000 in payments and had a balance of around $27,000. The economy crashed and the non-profit I worked for had to drop my income – a lot. We had to short-sell our house. I picked up some side work and eventually left the non-profit (501c3) in 2010. I took another job and essentially started over from a career standpoint.
Could you clarify the difference between the 10 year and 25 year loan forgiveness? I’m interested only in the 10 year as I may not be able to work for 25 years being in my mid forties. My loan amount is $40K, I expect to earn gross $65-70K per year, I am married but separated, and my husband’s income is very variable but on the low side (gross $45K/year) and he files business income as he works from home part time. Will the PSLF allow me to work for 10 years and forgive my loan and must I file married separately or jointly. I just graduated and am about to end my grace period so my monthly payment will be due soon. I will also be starting work in the next month.
I will start repaying my 75,000 loan (undergrad/grad). I’m a military spouse and currently don’t have a job. How I can tackle my student loan with only 1 income. I’m planning to join the Navy reserve, will that help forgive some of my loan? What is the best way to pay off my loan considering our current income situation? I can pay at least 200 a month but can I do that or the FedLoan servicing will set the amount that I need to pay? You’re feedback will be very helpful. Thank you.
Rates and offers current as October 1, 2019. Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.48% APR to 6.03% APR and Variable Rate range from 2.67% APR to 7.41%. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. For Variable Rate student loans, the rate will never exceed 9.00% for 5 year and 8 year loans and 10.00% for 12 and 15 years loans (the maximum allowable for this loan). Minimum variable rate will be 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.
Fixed rates from 3.460% APR to 7.944% APR (with AutoPay). Variable rates from 2.140% APR to 7.944% APR (with AutoPay). Interest rates on variable rate loans are capped at either 8.95% or 9.95% depending on term of loan. See APR examples and terms. Lowest variable rate of 2.140% APR assumes current 1 month LIBOR rate of 2.04588% plus 0.100% margin minus 0.25% ACH discount. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. If approved for a loan, the fixed or variable interest rate offered will depend on your creditworthiness, and the term of the loan and other factors, and will be within the ranges of rates listed above. For the SoFi variable rate loan, the 1-month LIBOR index will adjust monthly and the loan payment will be re-amortized and may change monthly. APRs for variable rate loans may increase after origination if the LIBOR index increases. The SoFi 0.25% AutoPay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account. *To check the rates and terms you qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit inquiry. Unlike hard credit inquiries, soft credit inquiries (or soft credit pulls) do not impact your credit score. Soft credit inquiries allow SoFi to show you what rates and terms SoFi can offer you up front. After seeing your rates, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit inquiry. Hard credit inquiries (or hard credit pulls) are required for SoFi to be able to issue you a loan. In addition to requiring your explicit permission, these credit pulls may impact your credit score. Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE.
Student loan forgiveness for nurses. Nurses shouldering student debt have several options for student loan forgiveness: Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Perkins loan cancellation, and the NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program, which pays up to 85% of qualified nurses’ unpaid college debt. Public Service Loan Forgiveness may be the most likely option for most nurses — few borrowers have Perkins loans, and the NURSE Corps program is highly competitive.
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