I am an officer in the army reserves I was active duty for two years with a deployment I have a contract for 8 years in the reserves but I still have about 60k in loans from school while in rotc but I am currently not full time is their anyway to get my loans forgiven or is my only option is to keep doing the income based repayment plan and in 20 years have them forgiven and would I have to stay in for 20
In 1994, I started at ITT. I applied for CAD, I thought I was going to take classes for CAD. Then I was told I tested higher in Electronics and I wld make more money in that field. I was 22 at the time, just married and had a child. So, I went with it. I was lied to from the beginning. I was only in the school 3 months at best. I have had hardship most of my adult life. Stuggling to make ends meet. I originally had my loan through William D Ford Direct Loans. I belive my loan was only 2k to start. Now its at 18k. I kept putting on a deferment. I explained about my hardship. This is what was recommended. Now my loan is at Navient..They want me to pay on this for 25 yrs and then they will give me a loan forgiveness. I’ll probably be be dead by then. Is their any way I can get a forgiveness on this loan now?
Finally, where is all the money going? I get that your payments are a lot of money each month, but your husband makes a really good income, and you didn’t say, but with that much debt I would guess you have your masters and earn at least $50k per year. That’s $185,000 per year – after taxes you should still be bringing in $11,500. After his child support you should still be at $10,000 or so per month. A big house, food for all the kids, clothes, etc, maybe costs you $6,000 per month (and that’s being very generous). Where’s the other $4,000 going? Something is not adding up here.

From 2000-2005, I took out Sallie Mae Parent Plus Loans, to put my son through college. A few years back Navient took over the loan. I have been paying a fixed amount for over 10 years. Did I qualify for any kind of loan forgiveness program? I’m a public school administrator and my son works for the City will leave in. Looks like I have 9 more years to go on this loan. Any advise you can give I would appreciate. Thank you.


First off,this site offers great advice! I’m currently a teacher in CA and have been for 8 years. I have $46,000 left on my student loans. I’m pretty certain I qualify for $5,000 off of my loans for being a highly qualified teacher that has taught for 5 consecutive years (although I haven’t applied yet because I’d like to see if there are better options out there).However, are there any other options to lower my debt or even possibly have it forgiven? Any help is greatly appreciated!
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Hi, Thank you for compiling all of this valuable info into one place. Your website has answered a lot of my questions. I am 90 days past due & was advised to apply for an IBR by my borrower. My question is I should be approved for an $0 payment due to being unemployed. Should I file taxes at all, with my husband as a dependent or how can we handle the tax aspect so we can keep our heads above water?
Robert I really appreciate what you are doing here. This student loan thing is so complicated. I am the parent of a grad-student who graduated in May with a degree in film (screenwriting) we co-signed on his private loans ($130k) and he still doesn’t have permanent/full time work. We have spoken to the loan provider and they want us to repay the loans since our son can’t yet. I don’t know how many of these options are available for private loans. Right now they want $1100 per month, which we can’t pay and neither can our son. We should never have co-signed because now its going to affect our credit and his. What are out options? Thanks
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Robert I really appreciate what you are doing here. This student loan thing is so complicated. I am the parent of a grad-student who graduated in May with a degree in film (screenwriting) we co-signed on his private loans ($130k) and he still doesn’t have permanent/full time work. We have spoken to the loan provider and they want us to repay the loans since our son can’t yet. I don’t know how many of these options are available for private loans. Right now they want $1100 per month, which we can’t pay and neither can our son. We should never have co-signed because now its going to affect our credit and his. What are out options? Thanks
Hello! I have over $120,000 in subsidized/unsubsidized student loans (not including interest). I was in dental school but I was dismissed due to failing. Now I’m stuck with loans for something I didn’t even earn. I didn’t have any loans while I was an undergraduate student, I had scholarships and grants. I’m currently pursuing a Master’s degree in public health, and I am preparing to begin a career as a teacher next year. I haven’t started paying loans yet because they’re still in deferment due to me being in school, but when I do I plan to do the IBR plan. I am hoping that I will also be able to qualify for public service loan forgiveness and teacher loan forgiveness. I believe that they’ll forgive up to $17,500 if I teach secondary science? Do you know if I could qualify for both forgiveness plans? Does teaching at a community college qualify me for public service or teacher loan forgiveness? Also, I understand that with the IBR, the loan can be canceled after 20-25 years. So, if I have the PSLF, it will be canceled in 10 years instead, correct? I also had a scholarship at the dental school that was turned into a loan because I didn’t complete the program and graduate to work in a rural area. However, I was dismissed, I didn’t voluntarily withdraw from the school. Now they’re expecting me to pay over $50,000 back, with about $20,000 of it behind and being sent to collections because they would not work with me to set up a payment arrangement (I didn’t have a job at the time). What can I do about that? Could I file bankruptcy to get rid of it? Any advice you can give will be wonderful.

Automatic Payment Discount Disclosure: Borrowers will be eligible to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction on their student loans owned by Citizens Bank, N.A. during such time as payments are required to be made and our loan servicer is authorized to automatically deduct payments each month from any bank account the borrower designates. Discount is not available when payments are not due, such as during forbearance. If our loan servicer is unable to successfully withdraw the automatic deductions from the designated account three or more times within any 12-month period, the borrower will no longer be eligible for this discount.


I was a teacher for almost 15 years at three different Title I schools which qualified me for the “service related” but I never took advantage of it because I was making good money. I decided to change jobs and to work for New York State in a juvenile detention center as a teacher, and I lost that job. I have been two years with out a job and no unemployment for the past year, so this doesn’t qualify me for the “service related” forgiveness plan. What should I do?

Refinancing student loans makes sense for many people if they are eligible. For starters, student loan consolidation (which is included in the student loan refinancing process) simplifies the management of your monthly payments. Refinancing allows you to consolidate both your federal and private loans, select a repayment term that makes sense for you, and often lower your interest rate. Here at Earnest, the entire application process is online, and you could have your new low interest rate loan in less than a week. Borrowers who refinance federal student loans should be aware of the repayment options that they are giving up. For example, Earnest does not offer income-based repayment plans or Public Service Loan Forgiveness. It’s possible to consolidate federal student loans (Federal Perkins, Direct subsidized, Direct unsubsidized, and Direct PLUS loans) with a Direct Consolidation Loan from the Department of Education, but this will not allow you to lower your interest rate and private student loans are not eligible.
I had a 47,000 student loan from 1997. In 2008 I was a substitute teacher and was not able to get any kind of loan adjustments to save my home. I have since stayed with various relatives and today I received a letter from a debt collector stating that the loan has been turned over to them. The last time I moved I was able to get work as a substitute teacher again. School has just begun so I am not working yet. The letter says that I now owe almost 90,000. $40,000 has been added to my loan. What should I do and do I qualify for any kind of loan forgiveness. How is it different since, it has been turned over to a debt collector.
Student loan forgiveness for nurses. Nurses shouldering student debt have several options for student loan forgiveness: Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Perkins loan cancellation, and the NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program, which pays up to 85% of qualified nurses’ unpaid college debt. Public Service Loan Forgiveness may be the most likely option for most nurses — few borrowers have Perkins loans, and the NURSE Corps program is highly competitive.
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