Tim, I took out loans under similar circumstances. I know the loans were federal but I have no idea what the program was. I know they weren’t Perkins loans and I’m not sure if they were Stafford loans or not but I think they were. The loans were serviced by SalieMae from inception starting around 1994. I moved out of forbearance, consolidated the loan to a 25 year repayment plan and have made every payment since September of 2004. I’ve also been a public sector (state) employee since 2002. I’m having trouble determining if my loans qualify. The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program stipulates that “only loans you received under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program are eligible for PSLF.” I’ve never heard of the program and assume it was created concurrent or subsequent to the inception of this program in 2007. Does that mean I am only eligible if I took out the original loans, or consolidated my loans after a certain date?
Yes, you should rehabilitate your loans and get on an income-based repayment plan again. When on the plan, you might consider filing your taxes married filing separately. You need to talk to a tax professional and see if it makes sense, but if you do, they will only count your income for your loans (which is $0). That will make your payments $0. However, your husband will pay much more in taxes as a result, so it might not be worth it – you have to do the math. Here’s an article about that: IBR and Married Filing Separately.
I have student loans about 28000 and did finish my degree due to the depression and OCD which I had since I was born plus 3 years ago my dad become disable due to the stroke which currently disable and no job. I had to quite my collage and staying with him to help him daily. No degree and no job only had 4100 Last year. What should I do and how can I pay the loan. Is there any forgiven loan program. Any recommendation which can help me please
4This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a refi borrower with a Full Principal & Interest Repayment and a 10-year repayment term, has a $40,000 loan and a 5.5% Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $434.11 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $52,092.61. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary.

Student loans can be expensive. Whether you refinance federal student loans, refinance private student loans or both, you will work with a private lender to refinance student loans. This is because the federal government does not refinance student loans. Lenders want to refinance student loans for borrowers who they believe will repay their student loans.
1Laurel Road: Laurel Road Bank is a Connecticut banking corporation offering products in all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. Laurel Road has helped thousands of professionals with graduate and undergraduate degrees across the country to refinance and consolidate over $3 billion in federal and private school loans, saving these borrowers thousands of dollars each. Lending services provided by Laurel Road Bank, Member FDIC. APR stands for “Annual Percentage Rate.” Rates listed include a 0.25% EFT discount, for automatic payments made from a checking or savings account. Interest rates as of 4/05/2019. Rates subject to change. Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.50% per year to 5.55% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.00% per year for a 7-year term, 4.30% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.60% per year to 6.80% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.05% per year to 7.02% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $137.84 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $103.88 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $78.30 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $67.66 to $79.16. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.25% per year to 6.05% per year for a 5-year term, 3.75% per year to 6.10% per year for a 7-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.15% per year for a 10-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.25% to 3.80% for the 5-year term loan, 1.50% to 3.85% for the 7-year term loan, 1.75% to 3.90% for the 10-year term loan, 2.00% to 4.15% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.25% to 4.40% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.75% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $178.58 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. 
She was told by the Dept of Ed that to find out what a “true” monthly payment would be she would need to drop out of the program she’s in, enroll in a “standard” program, get a payment plan, use a deferment to avoid making a payment, then re-enroll in the previous plan……. A typical gov’t agency approach to a situation, but completely idiotic…. and the needless killing of at least 3 trees in worhtless paperwork.
My wife has over $180k in student loan debt from medical school. I’ve only talked to one company about possibility of some of it being forgiven but they said going through them would actually increase our monthly payment by 100%. Said it was due to her income ($220k) That was unimagineable to me. Could that be correct? Any advice on what kind of specific program I should look in to and what company may be best to help with it? Thanks a lot!
Sadly, you’re not missing anything except you could have been more aggressive with certifying your income on an IBR program earlier. IBR will end after 25 years from when you started making payments under IBR as long as you never defaulted on the loan during that time (even with the forbearance). Have you called your lender to see when your 25 years is up? It could be 2018 based on a 1993 loan consolidation and being on IBR the entire time. However, if you didn’t start IBR until 2010 (it was hard to follow your timeline), then it will be over in 2035.

 I was seventeen no high school diploma failed enrollment testing did not have correct birth date and was told I could enroll for school. They had me sight on two loans when I was Grant accepted. Due to my lack of knowledge I was not aware of what I was signing. I failed my studies and was told I couldn’t graduate with my class because I was pregnant but rather than say I completely failed my course they pushed me into the next graduation class. School closed in 1992 so I was not able to return or retain original school documents.
I have student loan for about $25000. I wanted to become a teacher. Online college assured me that once i finish my teaching degree and work in the field for 5 years my loan will be completely waived off. I have about year and a 1/2 left over to finish this degree but I had a medical emergency. While the Dentist was examining my mouth his hand slipped and the sharp needle went under my tongue. I filed a lawsuit but he claims that never happened since then my nerve that was connected to my head from my mouth was pressed in. I had plenty of medical bill which I paid off and now I’m left with sharp shooting pain from my mouth to my head because of which I have difficulty continuing my education and becoming a teacher. What should I do?

I always recommend an income-based repayment plan if you need it. It just makes the most sense. And borrowers shouldn’t worry about the election – if anything changes, history tells us that it will just impact future borrowers, not existing ones. Each new payment plan, forgiveness program, etc. typically isn’t retro-active, but rather only impacts loans that originate in this year.


Good Morning Robert, I did an (Obama) forgivness loan agreement with NationalStudentCenter.com 1(866)359-3821. Currently unemployed and said I qualified for my loans to be consolidated and reduced all the way to $0 for the next 20-30 month with the first 3months being $197.33. Paid thru my checking and already one month in. The wierd thing is I had to Esign the App so they can move forward with the process. I received an email from NelNet saying that they received my App. But I never Esigned the App because I started to become skeptical about the loan. With the info that I just provided you, can your expertise tell me if this is a scam? If so how do I get out of it.
Borrower defense to repayment discharge. Borrowers defrauded by their colleges may qualify for debt relief. You’ll need to file a borrower defense to repayment claim with the U.S. Department of Education. If you qualify, you may have your loans automatically discharged, at the discretion of the Education Department, if your school was involved in clear, widespread fraud or misrepresentation that affected a broad group of borrowers.
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