Citizens Bank, one of the nation’s oldest and largest financial institutions, provides an integrated experience that includes mobile, online banking and lending solutions, a 24/7 customer contact center and the convenience of approximately 3,200 ATMs and approximately 1,200 branches. Citizens Bank is a leader in Student Loan solutions, offering lending solutions for parents, students and former students. The Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan is a leading solution helping graduates and former students to better manage their student debt. Citizens Bank helps its customers reach their potential by listening to them and by understanding their needs in order to offer tailored advice, ideas and solutions.
Next, you can choose what type of interest rate you want when you refinance. Variable-rate student loans can cost you less to start, but there’s the possibility that the interest rate goes up later. As a general rule, a variable-rate loan works well when you only need a couple years to pay off the balance, but you may also want to read more about choosing between fixed and variable student loan refinancing.
Laurel Road began originating student loans in 2013 and has since helped thousands of professionals with undergraduate and postgraduate degrees consolidate and refinance more than $4 billion in federal and private school loans. Laurel Road also offers a suite of online graduate school loan products and personal loans that help simplify lending through customized technology and personalized service. In April 2019, Laurel Road was acquired by KeyBank, one of the nation’s largest bank-based financial services companies. Laurel Road is a brand of KeyBank National Association offering online lending products in all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.  All loans are provided by KeyBank National Association, a nationally chartered bank.  Member FDIC.  For more information, visit www.laurelroad.com.
i am considering going to grad school and my friends that did MBAs told me they took out loans and with forbearance if they make less than 50k a year after graduation they don’t have to start paying the loan off. i don’t know what kind of loans they had but does this sound right and what kind of loans are they talking about? Is it all the ones mentioned in this article?

I am a mother of a child with a permanent disability. Do to my child needing my full care and attention, I could not finish school. I’m over $11,000 in debt with Mohela in student loans. Can my loans be forgiven, or discharged? I have been in a repayment plan that requires me to pay $0. Every year I have to renew it. I know I will not be able to make any payments anytime soon as I still care for my little one.
You job qualifies you, but the graduated repayment program does not until your graduated payment exceeds your 10-year standard payment (which typically doesn’t happen until the last few years of repayment). You need to switch repayment plans to standard 10-year, IBR, PAYE, RePAYE, or ICR – then you need to see if you’ll even have a balance left after 10 years.
Borrower, and Co-signer if applicable, must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident with a valid I-551 card (which must show a minimum of 10 years between “Resident Since” date and “Card Expires” date or has no expiration date); state that they are of at least borrowing age in the state of residence at the time of application; and meet Lender underwriting criteria (including, for example, employment, debt-to-income, disposable income, and credit history requirements).
It's that simple.  What's even better is that your income could be low enough to qualify for zero or minimal repayment, at which your loan will be forgiven at the end. Yes, there may be tax consequences, but that shouldn't deter you from these programs. It is the best alternative if you can't afford your loans and you are looking for forgiveness options (and we discuss the taxes a bit at the end of the article).

Forgiven loans may be taxable. Generally, forgiven, canceled or discharged student debt is taxed as income unless you were required to work for a certain type of employer or in a certain profession to qualify for the forgiveness. For instance, loans discharged through Public Service Loan Forgiveness are not taxable, but debt forgiven through income-driven repayment plans is taxable. Loans discharged upon a borrower’s death or permanent disability were previously taxed as income, but the latest tax code changed that. Loans discharged for this reason after Dec. 31, 2017, are not taxable.
i am considering going to grad school and my friends that did MBAs told me they took out loans and with forbearance if they make less than 50k a year after graduation they don’t have to start paying the loan off. i don’t know what kind of loans they had but does this sound right and what kind of loans are they talking about? Is it all the ones mentioned in this article?
My granddaughter went to school locally for part of a qtr. (2015) She was actually pregnant before she started and then she couldn’t finish. She was a minority (ethnically) and received alot of bullying and couldn’t take it. She owes about $7,000. The school turned it over to a collection agency. She can’t afford to pay that back. She is single and now has another child. Can you give me any ideas to help on what she can do?
Yes I’m in the process of filing an application for loan forgiveness for a parent plus loan I’ve got all the info and the original denial letter from sallie Mae that said I wasn’t able to get this loan then was given one how in the hell does this happen. My son attended that ITT Tech school back in 2010. Do you think I will get some forgiveness for the institute falsely misrepresented my credit history?

So i have about $65k in federal loans and $20k in private student loan debt. I have worked for a non-profit for over 9 years and I had hopes that I would qualify for student loan forgiveness after getting confirmation that my employer was a certified employer under the student loan forgiveness program. Well it turns out i’ve made over 10 years of payments and i was on the wrong payment plan and i also consolidated in 2016 so i have to start all over with the 120 payments. I don’t plan to work here for another 10 years so i am extremely disappointed i didn’t know this information earlier. I now switched to IBR and my payments are $0. It’s my understanding that under IBR your payments are forgiven after 25 years. So since i’ve made over 10 years of payments already (under another payment plan) does this count towards the 25 years or does it start all over since i just got on IBR? I guess i want to know when my 25 year mark would be.
What about consolidating? I was paying for years on my loan, decided to consolidate for a lower monthly payment and then was told about the public loan forgiveness plan. Long story short, I had to start the payment process all over! They say there is nothing I can do about that now… do you know if there is a way to get those previous payments counted? I mean it all goes to the same place in The end… department of Ed! So annoyed!
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Hello Robert, I recently read your post about FedLoan servicing which is my student loan servicer. I am a recent grad and my loans have just exited their grace period. I have been in the process for about 2 months now to try and switch to a pay as you earn or an income based plan. My application is in, but have not heard about processing. Any advice on how to achieve and get news about this with FedLoan servicing?
However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account.
Here I am 24 years later, have been paying on my loan(s) for 10 years, every month, and I still owe $65,000. I DO NOT want something for nothing but I want to pay what I owe. I have tried negotiating a lower APR, currently paying 21%, but Nelnet says that isn’t possible, basically they refuse. I have also asked to negotiate a lower amount owed, again was told no.
Advice please! I have $260,000 in undergraduate and graduate school loans which continues to grow due to interest. I am currently under IBR since 2011 and pay 15% of my AGI which is $100,000. I understand after 25 years any amount will be forgiven but will be taxed as income. So in 21 years after my loans continue to increase due to interest I will have approximately $450,000-$500,000 in loans forgiven. If they tax that as income that means I’ll be taxed roughly 40% of $550,000-$600,000 which is $220,00. Then I’ll have to get on a repayment to pay those taxes. It will be a never ending task to pay off my school loans unless I hit the lottery. Any advice please?

First off,this site offers great advice! I’m currently a teacher in CA and have been for 8 years. I have $46,000 left on my student loans. I’m pretty certain I qualify for $5,000 off of my loans for being a highly qualified teacher that has taught for 5 consecutive years (although I haven’t applied yet because I’d like to see if there are better options out there).However, are there any other options to lower my debt or even possibly have it forgiven? Any help is greatly appreciated!
Co-signer Release: Borrowers may apply for co-signer release after making 36 consecutive on-time payments of principal and interest. For the purpose of the application for co-signer release, on-time payments are defined as payments received within 15 days of the due date. Interest only payments do not qualify. The borrower must meet certain credit and eligibility guidelines when applying for the co-signer release. Borrowers must complete an application for release and provide income verification documents as part of the review. Borrowers who use deferment or forbearance will need to make 36 consecutive on-time payments after reentering repayment to qualify for release. The borrower applying for co-signer release must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. If an application for co-signer release is denied, the borrower may not reapply for co-signer release until at least one year from the date the application for co-signer release was received. Terms and conditions apply. Borrowers whose loans were funded prior to reaching the age of majority may not be eligible for co-signer release. Note: co-signer release is not available on the Student Loan for Parents or Education Refinance Loan for Parents.
Automatically withdrawn payment discount (“ACH”) — You may qualify for a 0.25% interest rate discount during repayment if you set up automatically withdrawn payments (ACH), directly with Wells Fargo Education Financial Services (EFS), from a designated deposit account. This discount does not apply to bill pay or automatic transfers not set up directly with Wells Fargo EFS. If the automatic payment is canceled at any time after repayment begins, the discount will be lost until automatic payment is reinstated. The 0.25% interest rate reduction is effective the day after the first payment is made using automatic withdrawal during the repayment period. The discount reduces the amount of interest you pay over the life of the loan. The automatic payment discount may not change your monthly payment amount depending on the type of loan you receive, but may reduce the number of payments or the amount of your final payment. ACH payments and discount will discontinue upon entering deferment or forbearance periods.

1Laurel Road: Laurel Road Bank is a Connecticut banking corporation offering products in all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. Laurel Road has helped thousands of professionals with graduate and undergraduate degrees across the country to refinance and consolidate over $3 billion in federal and private school loans, saving these borrowers thousands of dollars each. Lending services provided by Laurel Road Bank, Member FDIC. APR stands for “Annual Percentage Rate.” Rates listed include a 0.25% EFT discount, for automatic payments made from a checking or savings account. Interest rates as of 4/05/2019. Rates subject to change. Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.50% per year to 5.55% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.00% per year for a 7-year term, 4.30% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.60% per year to 6.80% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.05% per year to 7.02% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $137.84 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $103.88 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $78.30 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $67.66 to $79.16. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.25% per year to 6.05% per year for a 5-year term, 3.75% per year to 6.10% per year for a 7-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.15% per year for a 10-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.25% to 3.80% for the 5-year term loan, 1.50% to 3.85% for the 7-year term loan, 1.75% to 3.90% for the 10-year term loan, 2.00% to 4.15% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.25% to 4.40% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.75% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $178.58 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. 
I went back to college at 35, just to get the piece of paper because I couldn’t get an accounting job without a degree after moving to a college town, even with nearly 20 years experience. Because of my hour commute to the next state for work, my most flexible choice was Univ of Phoenix online. I graduated in 2011, and went into repayment in March 2012. I paid 1 loan off before graduation and I’ve paid ahead since then, killing off 1 loan at a time so I’m down to only 5 loans left, with 1 of them paid down so it’ll pay off over a year early. Because I had my payment frozen a couple years ago, I’m also paying about $50 extra a month. I haven’t worked in almost a year and a half for medical reasons, and am waiting for a disability appeal hearing because I was denied on a technicality, so my boyfriend has been covering my student loan payment to protect my credit, and because I was raised that you pay what you owe. Am I better off continuing as is or will an IBR program not hurt my credit standing? It’s not that he minds, but I feel bad about him paying it when I can’t work.
I went back to college at 35, just to get the piece of paper because I couldn’t get an accounting job without a degree after moving to a college town, even with nearly 20 years experience. Because of my hour commute to the next state for work, my most flexible choice was Univ of Phoenix online. I graduated in 2011, and went into repayment in March 2012. I paid 1 loan off before graduation and I’ve paid ahead since then, killing off 1 loan at a time so I’m down to only 5 loans left, with 1 of them paid down so it’ll pay off over a year early. Because I had my payment frozen a couple years ago, I’m also paying about $50 extra a month. I haven’t worked in almost a year and a half for medical reasons, and am waiting for a disability appeal hearing because I was denied on a technicality, so my boyfriend has been covering my student loan payment to protect my credit, and because I was raised that you pay what you owe. Am I better off continuing as is or will an IBR program not hurt my credit standing? It’s not that he minds, but I feel bad about him paying it when I can’t work.
I have two loans outstanding : 1) original in Jan 1997 from Sallie Mae and 2) original 2012 from Navy Federal. I am a nurse practitioner and cannot figure out how middle class people are supposed to qualify for these federal loan dismissal programs. I have been in graduate school for past 3 years paying as I go along. What is left for me to do to get these paid off or forgiven? Very frustrating to say the least.

Tim, thanks for doing what you do here. Any word on changes to the PSLF program, in lieu of the proposed $57K cap? I’m in the IBR program, working for a 501(c)3 nonprofit, and have been making qualifying payments for approximately six years – and I’m terrified that changes to the PSLF program will affect me. All my loans are federal. Also, I’ve been told by my loan servicer in the past that I don’t do anything “now” for PSLF, that I wait until closer to the end of the 10 years. Any insight into that?
Along with your credit score and annual income, some lenders also look at your savings and debt-to-income ratio. Finally, some lenders require proof of graduation, as they’ll only approve borrowers who have obtained their degree. If you left school before graduating, there are relatively few student loan refinance providers that will work with you.
Hello I saw this article and found it confusing. I am in $35-40k in debt and my loans are in good standing because I’ve deferred them but of course the interest is what had escalated. I just started working and muy income is not very high at al and am a single mother of 3. What do you suggest I do? I’m not quite sure which plan would work. Also if you get on one of these plans do they pull/take your income tax every year?
Forgiveness isn’t an option for defaulted loans. You’ll need to use consolidation or rehabilitation to get defaulted federal student loans in good standing before they’re eligible for forgiveness programs. If your loans won’t qualify for forgiveness, student loan settlement or bankruptcy may reduce your debt in severe cases. Defaulted federal loans are eligible for discharge programs.
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