I was enrolled in Army ROTC from 2007-2011. I had a false statement filed against me and was given one of two options. Serve 4 years active duty starting out as an E-1, or fight it with a formal board. I fought it and just recently have exhausted all my appeals. Several cadre members had even made statements pertaining to how the process was stacked against me from the beginning. I involved a state Senator and Congresswoman who both opened congressional inquiries. Still to no avail.
Hello Robert, I recently read your post about FedLoan servicing which is my student loan servicer. I am a recent grad and my loans have just exited their grace period. I have been in the process for about 2 months now to try and switch to a pay as you earn or an income based plan. My application is in, but have not heard about processing. Any advice on how to achieve and get news about this with FedLoan servicing?
I currently owe 385,000 in student loans. My loans are a combination of undergraduate, law school and and LL.M degree. All of these loans are also at varying interest rates, from 5.8-8.5 and dating back to 2003. They are all federal and are direct, ffel, etc. One of the things I don’t understand is interest. I am currently on IBR which makes my payments affordable. But unfortunately I don’t make enough money to put a dent in the principal. Although my goal is to make more money, I just had the interest on my loan capitalized to the current amount because I did not recertify my IBR on time (this is my first year on IBR). I applied for reinstatement of IBR so I am waiting on approval. My question is, hypothetically if I am not able to increase my salary significantly enough to put a dent in the principal, will I owe BOTH the principal and the unpaid interest at the end of the 25 year term? And what happens to the unpaid interest while I am in repayment?
I was enrolled in Army ROTC from 2007-2011. I had a false statement filed against me and was given one of two options. Serve 4 years active duty starting out as an E-1, or fight it with a formal board. I fought it and just recently have exhausted all my appeals. Several cadre members had even made statements pertaining to how the process was stacked against me from the beginning. I involved a state Senator and Congresswoman who both opened congressional inquiries. Still to no avail.
After reading all the comments above I am extremely worried for my daughter who will be going off to college next year. The school she will be attending is a private Christian college, after scholarships she will have some debts. What types of loans should she get? There are so many I’m totally confused. I would like to help her make the right decisions from the beginning so she doesn’t go through what others are suffering.
I Would LOVE for somebody to help me figure out my student loans….. I have a company garnishing my wages from one company to another company I’m paying money too…. and then then I got another letter from a lawyer saying I owe more money..WHAT is going on? ???? I started out with maybe 35 To 40 thousand debt which is up to 70or 80thousand now…. and I don’t know what’s going on and I need somebody to help me…
Total and permanent disability discharge. If you cannot work due to being totally and permanently disabled, physically or mentally, you may qualify to have your remaining student loan debt canceled. To be eligible, you’ll need to provide documentation proving your disability. Once your loans are discharged, the government may monitor your finances and disability for three years. If you don’t meet requirements during the monitoring period, your loans may be reinstated. Details on the application process are available at disabilitydischarge.com.

Student loan Refinance: Fixed rates from 3.46% APR to 5.98% APR (with AutoPay). Variable rates from 2.05% APR to 5.98% APR (with AutoPay). Interest rates on variable rate loans are capped at either 8.95% or 9.95% depending on term of loan. See APR examples and terms. Lowest variable rate of 2.05% APR assumes current 1 month LIBOR rate of 2.05% minus 0.15% margin minus 0.25% ACH discount. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. If approved for a loan, the fixed or variable interest rate offered will depend on your creditworthiness, and the term of the loan and other factors, and will be within the ranges of rates listed above. For the SoFi variable rate loan, the 1-month LIBOR index will adjust monthly and the loan payment will be re-amortized and may change monthly. APRs for variable rate loans may increase after origination if the LIBOR index increases. See eligibility details. The SoFi 0.25% AutoPay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account. *To check the rates and terms you qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit inquiry. Unlike hard credit inquiries, soft credit inquiries (or soft credit pulls) do not impact your credit score. Soft credit inquiries allow SoFi to show you what rates and terms SoFi can offer you up front. After seeing your rates, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit inquiry. Hard credit inquiries (or hard credit pulls) are required for SoFi to be able to issue you a loan. In addition to requiring your explicit permission, these credit pulls may impact your credit score. Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE.
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We are a family of 5 with one income – my wife went back to school a couple of years ago. My income has risen in very small amounts over the past 5 years but not enough to even pay the interest let alone the principal. I can keep doing the IBR program and watch the interest continue to drive the loan amount through the roof — but I am hoping you know of something better, some way to stop the madness.

I will start repaying my 75,000 loan (undergrad/grad). I’m a military spouse and currently don’t have a job. How I can tackle my student loan with only 1 income. I’m planning to join the Navy reserve, will that help forgive some of my loan? What is the best way to pay off my loan considering our current income situation? I can pay at least 200 a month but can I do that or the FedLoan servicing will set the amount that I need to pay? You’re feedback will be very helpful. Thank you.
https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service/questions https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service/temporary-expanded-public-service-loan-forgiveness https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/teacher https://www.disabilitydischarge.com/ https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/disability-discharge https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/death https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/closed-school https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/perkins https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/charts https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand/plans
From 2000-2005, I took out Sallie Mae Parent Plus Loans, to put my son through college. A few years back Navient took over the loan. I have been paying a fixed amount for over 10 years. Did I qualify for any kind of loan forgiveness program? I’m a public school administrator and my son works for the City will leave in. Looks like I have 9 more years to go on this loan. Any advise you can give I would appreciate. Thank you.
I’ve read as many of the above comments as I could in order to avoid a repeat question, but couldn’t find any that directly addressed my situation. I’m scared to contact Direct Loans (all of my considerable undergrad and grad student loans are Federal loans), because I’ve been in default for so long. Just before I completed my Ph.D., two things happened. One: I became a mother with very bad post-partum depression, and Two: I had a nervous breakdown because my graduate advisor stole my work and sabotaged my ethnographic field study due to sheer incompetence. I didn’t fight any of it (see above references to total physical and emotional breakdowns), but instead focused on keeping myself and my children alive and in gradually improving health. It really was a survival situation. My husband has been our sole provider since I left graduate school (ABD), and I have not been employed outside the home since then. I have, however, homeschooled both of our children diligently and well, as well as run a small organic farm on one income. His income is barely enough for us to do this. It is certainly not enough for us to pay 15% of our income to loans, and so I am also exploring ways to use my education for income so that I can pay off loans. Like…write a bestseller. Yeah. (It’s actually not a total pipe dream. I do have one 600 page novel nearly finished, and it’s pretty damned good.) So my question is this: since none of my debt was incurred while married, and since I have not been employed since 2003, and since I DO very much want to repay my debt, but it pretty much seems completely hopeless, what can I do? What’s the best way to go forward here?
I have about 200,000 in student loans. I am just starting to pay them off. I work for an Intermediate unit, so I was told I would qualify for PSLF after ten years of making payments on time. I was also told I can consolidate to decrease payment amounts. I am not sure which plan to choose to remain in the PSLF program. Do I have to do IBR? Or can I select Graduated which gives me a lower payment? I would love to have the smaller monthly payment and extended loan amount. Any suggestions?
Hi. Ten years ago my husband attended a for profit college that will officially be closing its doors in September of this year due to false recruitment practices. He worked in the field for 10 yrs but two years ago he could no longer take the pay or the hours and changed fields. His loans were all federal loans. Does he qualify for loan forgiveness?

Im on SSDI and had my dr fill out paperwork for them to do the forgiveness. My dr. filled out that paperwork 5 times. starting in 2008. They wrote this off about 2 years ago my mom told me I remember you calling and telling me they finally did it. Now they are telling me that only 2 are discharged and 2 are still in 3 year period. Ive been in that 3 year period for ever then. Im not exactly sure what more to do but if they continue this and I start having problems with my heart thats going to be an issue for me. any advise Ive been on disability now for almost 8 years. when this started I had only been on it for 1 year
The information provided on this page is updated as of 10/11/2019. Earnest reserves the right to change, pause, or terminate product offerings at any time without notice. Earnest loans are originated by Earnest Operations LLC. California Finance Lender License 6054788. NMLS # 1204917. Earnest Operations LLC is located at 302 2nd Street, Suite 401N, San Francisco, CA 94107. Terms and Conditions apply. Visit https://www.earnest.com/terms-of-service, email us at [email protected], or call 888-601-2801 for more information on our student loan refinance product.
Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Public Service Loan Forgiveness is available to government and qualifying nonprofit employees with federal student loans. Eligible borrowers can have their remaining loan balance forgiven tax-free after making 120 qualifying loan payments. In order to benefit from PSLF, you’ll need to make payments while enrolled in an income-driven repayment plan. Otherwise, on a standard repayment plan, the loan would be paid off before you’re eligible to benefit from forgiveness.
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