I have two loans outstanding : 1) original in Jan 1997 from Sallie Mae and 2) original 2012 from Navy Federal. I am a nurse practitioner and cannot figure out how middle class people are supposed to qualify for these federal loan dismissal programs. I have been in graduate school for past 3 years paying as I go along. What is left for me to do to get these paid off or forgiven? Very frustrating to say the least.


We may agree under certain circumstances to allow a borrower to make $100/month payments for a period of time immediately after loan disbursement if the borrower is employed full-time as an intern, resident, or similar postgraduate trainee at the time of loan disbursement. These payments may not be enough to cover all of the interest that accrues on the loan. Unpaid accrued interest will be added to your loan and monthly payments of principal and interest will begin when the post-graduate training program ends.
You can start by looking at our list of the best student loan refinancing lenders, and then picking out the ones that seem like good fits. All these lenders let you check what kind of loan terms you could get through them online in a matter of minutes. You just plug in some of your information, the lender does a soft credit check (which has no impact on your credit score), and then they’ll show you potential loan options.
Consolidating student loans via refinancing is best for people whose financial position - in terms of employment, cash flow, and credit - has improved since they graduated from school. People who are working in the public sector or taking advantage of federal debt relief programs such as income-based repayment or public service forgiveness may not want to refinance, as these programs do not transfer to private refinance loans.
However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account.
I was a teacher for almost 15 years at three different Title I schools which qualified me for the “service related” but I never took advantage of it because I was making good money. I decided to change jobs and to work for New York State in a juvenile detention center as a teacher, and I lost that job. I have been two years with out a job and no unemployment for the past year, so this doesn’t qualify me for the “service related” forgiveness plan. What should I do?
I did the same thing. Paid a company to get my student loans into a rehab program. 7 months and almost $500 later, I am still in the same situation and nothing is being done. Its always one excuse after another. Please don’t pay someone to do what you can do for free youself. I just wish there was some way to get back that lost time and money. Good luck!
You can refinance one or more federal and/or private student loans, but you must meet a lender’s requirements for credit and income. Most lenders look for a credit score of 650 or higher, along with a steady source of income or an offer of employment. If you can’t meet these criteria on your own, you could qualify by applying with a creditworthy cosigner, such as a parent.

Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.54% to 4.16% for the 5-year term loan, 1.86% to 4.21% for the 7-year term loan, 2.11% to 4.26% for the 10-year term loan, 2.36% to 4.51% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.61% to 4.76% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $178.27 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93.
Forgiven loans may be taxable. Generally, forgiven, canceled or discharged student debt is taxed as income unless you were required to work for a certain type of employer or in a certain profession to qualify for the forgiveness. For instance, loans discharged through Public Service Loan Forgiveness are not taxable, but debt forgiven through income-driven repayment plans is taxable. Loans discharged upon a borrower’s death or permanent disability were previously taxed as income, but the latest tax code changed that. Loans discharged for this reason after Dec. 31, 2017, are not taxable.
I took out Federal Student Loans in 1986 totaling about $25,000. Repayment began in 1992. I consolidated Perkins and Stafford loans in 1995. I have made 188 payments totaling $55,800 of which only $12,800 has gone to principal the remaining has gone to interest. I feel this is ridiculously upside down for a federal student loan. My current balance is $38000. Is there anything I can do to have all or part of this forgiven? I also very small loan from 2011 at a lower interest rate. Would consolidating make any difference?
It’s hard to say for sure what you should do in this situation, but don’t give up, because you do have options. The loan is never going to disappear entirely, and don’t think that “forgiveness” is free, because even when you have your debt “forgiven”, the IRS counts it as taxable income for that year, and you end up facing a pretty big tax bill anyway.
Thank you. The article you referenced states that the AGI is minus personal exemptions and itemized deductions…which is wrong. “Adjusted Gross Income is calculated before the itemized or standard deductions” from a tax website. I WISH it was after exemptions and itemized deductions as that is a huge, huge difference in the AGI…but it’s not. My payment is supposed to be $400 based on my husbands income alone and their is no way we can do that now…none. If find SOME job to make that $400, the payment will just go UP…which is crazy. It’s like you cannot win. It seems to make no sense for me to work at all….which is wrong. Filing separately seems to be a choice, but we have a daughter in college and would lose the education deductions, etc. This whole thing is crazy if it makes more financial sense for me to not work at all! Or I guess he could file injured spouse year after year, but I just don’t understand why they won’t just consider MY income. Sorry for venting, just frustrated.
I always recommend an income-based repayment plan if you need it. It just makes the most sense. And borrowers shouldn’t worry about the election – if anything changes, history tells us that it will just impact future borrowers, not existing ones. Each new payment plan, forgiveness program, etc. typically isn’t retro-active, but rather only impacts loans that originate in this year.

I have my payments deferred at the moment as I have not been able to work, due to caring for my daughter with special needs. My husband is the only one working. The loans are in my name only. My/our question is this; If I can find a way to bring in ANY income at all, won’t it just make my payment go even higher? Because doesn’t every plan include my husband’s earnings?? My husband says it makes no sense to do that-try and find SOMETHING to earn because we will be out more money in the end-due to them always using his income. Are we missing something?

I went back to college at 35, just to get the piece of paper because I couldn’t get an accounting job without a degree after moving to a college town, even with nearly 20 years experience. Because of my hour commute to the next state for work, my most flexible choice was Univ of Phoenix online. I graduated in 2011, and went into repayment in March 2012. I paid 1 loan off before graduation and I’ve paid ahead since then, killing off 1 loan at a time so I’m down to only 5 loans left, with 1 of them paid down so it’ll pay off over a year early. Because I had my payment frozen a couple years ago, I’m also paying about $50 extra a month. I haven’t worked in almost a year and a half for medical reasons, and am waiting for a disability appeal hearing because I was denied on a technicality, so my boyfriend has been covering my student loan payment to protect my credit, and because I was raised that you pay what you owe. Am I better off continuing as is or will an IBR program not hurt my credit standing? It’s not that he minds, but I feel bad about him paying it when I can’t work.
https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service/questions https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service/temporary-expanded-public-service-loan-forgiveness https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/teacher https://www.disabilitydischarge.com/ https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/disability-discharge https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/death https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/closed-school https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/perkins https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/charts https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand/plans

Borrower, and Co-signer if applicable, must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident with a valid I-551 card (which must show a minimum of 10 years between “Resident Since” date and “Card Expires” date or has no expiration date); state that they are of at least borrowing age in the state of residence at the time of application; and meet Lender underwriting criteria (including, for example, employment, debt-to-income, disposable income, and credit history requirements).

I’m grateful I found this page via Pinterest but I’m also angry I didn’t know it before. I’ve been deferring my $40000 consolidation loans for 8 years because I could never afford even the minimum payment. My current balance is now $63000. If I understand correctly, I could’ve been on IBR for 8 years now, probably with a payment of $0 since my income is usually right at poverty level?? I had checked into this before on Sallie Mae/Navient’s website, but it always said that the minimum payment is $208 for IBR (even with an income of $17k 2 person family)…I had no clue I had to go to a separate website (Studentloans.gov) to get a different answer. So frustrating that SM/Navient seems to NOT want people to know this information. I feel like I could’ve been 8 years closer to forgiveness.
My husband and I have only been married for 4 years. He is 49 and I am 42. He has 4 kids but 2 only in high school, one in college, and one just went through Marine boot camp training for the Nat. Reserves. He is a CRNA making 135K paying $1500 in child support (joint custody). I am a teacher (7th full year), with 2 children receive zero child support (joint custody). He has $225K loan debt and I have $125K loan debt. The last two years we filed separately and on the IBR program. This helped him because his was originally a Graduated plan. At this time he pays $600 on one loan and $200 on another loan(I believe it is the private loan). I pay $0 now based on this plan.
Splash Financial: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.50% APR to 7.03% APR and Variable Rates range from 2.43% APR to 7.76% APR. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. Fixed rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 6.49% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.59% to 6.54% for a 8-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.79% per year to 6.59% per year for a 12-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). Variable rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 3.69% per year to 5.72% per year for a 8-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.47% per year to 6.36% per year for a 12-year term, 4.50% per year to 7.76% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. Variable interest rates will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. The maximum variable rate on the student refinance loan is 9.00% for 5-year, 7-year, 8-year and 10-year terms, and 10.00% for 12-year, 15-year and 20-year terms. The floor rate is 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.
If you teach full-time for five complete and consecutive academic years in a low-income elementary school, secondary school, or educational service agency, you may be eligible for forgiveness of up to $17,500 on your Direct Loan or FFEL program loans. See StudentAid.gov/teach-forgive for more information and a form you can fill out when you have completed your teaching service.

Remember that when you’re refinancing, you can pick exactly which loans you want to refinance. You’re free to refinance only your private student loans and continue paying off the federal loans like normal. You may find that option gives you the best of both worlds, allowing you to save money on your private loans while retaining the perks of your federal loans.
We are a family of 5 with one income – my wife went back to school a couple of years ago. My income has risen in very small amounts over the past 5 years but not enough to even pay the interest let alone the principal. I can keep doing the IBR program and watch the interest continue to drive the loan amount through the roof — but I am hoping you know of something better, some way to stop the madness.
What about consolidating? I was paying for years on my loan, decided to consolidate for a lower monthly payment and then was told about the public loan forgiveness plan. Long story short, I had to start the payment process all over! They say there is nothing I can do about that now… do you know if there is a way to get those previous payments counted? I mean it all goes to the same place in The end… department of Ed! So annoyed!

Student loan forgiveness for nurses. Nurses shouldering student debt have several options for student loan forgiveness: Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Perkins loan cancellation, and the NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program, which pays up to 85% of qualified nurses’ unpaid college debt. Public Service Loan Forgiveness may be the most likely option for most nurses — few borrowers have Perkins loans, and the NURSE Corps program is highly competitive.

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