Hi, Robert. I have two loans, one through Navient that the interest has been paid off on and the principal is down to 16,000. I have another loan for 19,000 through Great Lakes that just went into repayment. Between the two loans my payments are around 350 a month. I’m looking into the IBR but don’t want to start over on a 198-month term since my first loan is from 2003 and I’ve already paid the interest. I also work for a non-profit as an RN so I want to apply for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Is it worth it to start over with a new term?
Peace Corps volunteers are eligible to apply for Stafford, Perkins and Consolidation loans deferment, as well as partial cancellations of Perkins Loans (at 15% for each year of service, up to a maximum of 70% in total loan Perkins Loans forgiveness for service). For more information, contact the Peace Corps at 1-800-424-8580, or visit the Peace Corps website here.
Their seems to be no provision made to forgive student loans at the time of 9/11 and the years following when so many middle class families who were and still are, bearing the brunt of supporting the economy and cities by continuing to pay taxes even when the lower income are not required to. Most middle class families took student loans and lost everything after 9/11.
My navient and nelnet government student loans are both in hardship deferments. If I consolidate these two student loans when my deferments end in june, this month, 2019, and July next month 2019, will this new consolidated student loan qualify for ibr and the 20 and 25-year undergrad and grad student loan forgiveness? My student loan debt exceeds my own income at this time so much that my monthly payment will be set at $0. However, I filed a joint return with my husband this year, so if I go on ibr this year, my monthly payment will not be $0 but based on both my husband’s (primary income) and mine ($12,000 per year). Our debts are such that we cannot afford the ibr payments based on our joint income tax filing for this year. If I fail to make any payments on either student loan once my deferments end this month, in June and next month in July, until the new 2020 tax year, so in Feb and March 2020, can I then just file separately and qualify for the ibr $0 monthly payment? I just wonder (am terrified) of what will happen in the 7-month period when I’m not making any payments; should I let my student loan lenders know my situation? If I miss 7 payments, so not yet defaulting, will i still qualify for ibr after these missed payments? Thank you for your help; I sometimes want to jump off a bridge when I see that terrifying student loan debt total.

i had a student loan that i got before i got married , my husband has been filing me on his taxes for almost nine years now and just so happen the us department of education took part of his taxes last year. we were told that if i didnt earn an income that they could not take his taxes because that would b against the law because i didnt earn it. is that true? and if so how can i get his money back cause they sed they can not give it back
FIXED APR Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.50% per year to 5.55% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.00% per year for a 7-year term, 4.30% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.60% per year to 6.80% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.05% per year to 7.02% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.14% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $142.00 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.24% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $107.24 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $80.65 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.61% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $69.41 to $79.16. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. VARIABLE APR Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.50% per year to 6.05% per year for a 5-year term, 3.75% per year to 6.10% per year for a 7-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.15% per year for a 10-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.98% to 3.80% for the 5-year term loan, 2.35% to 3.85% for the 7-year term loan, 2.40% to 3.90% for the 10-year term loan, 2.65% to 4.15% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.90% to 4.40% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.49% per year to 6.31% per year for a 5-year term would be from $181.87 to $194.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.86% per year to 6.36% per year for a 7-year term would be from $140.68 to $147.82. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.91% per year to 6.41% per year for a 10-year term would be from $105.63 to $113.09. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.16% per year to 6.66% per year for a 15-year term would be from $79.92 to $87.99. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.41% per year to 6.91% per year for a 20-year term would be from $68.28 to $76.99. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account.
I have two graduate school loans from 2010 to 2013 – Stafford Loan and Grad Plus loan. I am currently enrolled in the pay as you earn program but am confused on the “loan forgiveness” opportunities. If I am not working in a public sector; can I still qualify for the 10 year forgiveness or does that automatically place me in the 25 year category? Also, am I responsible for taxes on the amount that is forgiven after 10 or 25 (whichever is applicable to my situation)?
I have a hard time finding any jobs I qualify for in some of the very rural areas the Army sends my husband. I have been told I’m over qualified since I have my master’s degree to work at a college. I was also in a car wreck in 2003 and now have a lot of issues with my knee (have had surgery) and neck (need surgery). My brother who is an RN said I definitely need to qualify for disability… But I’ve been fighting it, not sure I’m ready to do that. But there are times when I can’t use my left arm and have been in physical therapy so many times now for my neck and knee. My husband (been married 11 years) has no plans of helping me pay on my student loans at all. And some employers don’t want to hire a military spouse knowing we’ll have to move within 2 years. This student loan debt is ALWAYS on my mind and I get very depressed over it (I graduated in 1995 and did pay on them before I started moving around with my husband.) I just don’t even know what to do…
I will start repaying my 75,000 loan (undergrad/grad). I’m a military spouse and currently don’t have a job. How I can tackle my student loan with only 1 income. I’m planning to join the Navy reserve, will that help forgive some of my loan? What is the best way to pay off my loan considering our current income situation? I can pay at least 200 a month but can I do that or the FedLoan servicing will set the amount that I need to pay? You’re feedback will be very helpful. Thank you.
Graduates may refinance any unsubsidized or subsidized Federal or private student loan that was used exclusively for qualified higher education expenses (as defined in 26 USC Section 221) at an accredited U.S. undergraduate or graduate school. Any federal loans refinanced with Lender are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment.

Subject to floor rate and may require the automatic payments be made from a checking or savings account with the lender. The rate reduction will be removed and the rate will be increased by 0.25% upon any cancellation or failed collection attempt of the automatic payment and will be suspended during any period of deferment or forbearance. As a result, during the forbearance or suspension period, and/or if the automatic payment is canceled, any increase will take the form of higher payments. The lowest advertised variable APR is only available for loan terms of 5 years and is reserved for applicants with FICO scores of at least 810.
My wife has over $180k in student loan debt from medical school. I’ve only talked to one company about possibility of some of it being forgiven but they said going through them would actually increase our monthly payment by 100%. Said it was due to her income ($220k) That was unimagineable to me. Could that be correct? Any advice on what kind of specific program I should look in to and what company may be best to help with it? Thanks a lot!

It's almost mind-boggling how much money I'll save through refinancing my student loans with SoFi - I'd literally be paying tens of thousands more with my original loans. Now that I’ve refinanced my student loans with SoFi, I see a light at the end of the tunnel. I’m able to put away a little bit more, think about long term goals, save for a house - and I know this burden isn’t going to be over my head for the rest of my life.
After loan disbursement, if a borrower documents a qualifying economic hardship, we may agree in our discretion to allow for full or partial forbearance of payments for one or more 3-month time periods (not to exceed 12 months in the aggregate during the term of your loan), provided that we receive acceptable documentation (including updating documentation) of the nature and expected duration of the borrower’s economic hardship.
You’re mixing up two different things. Graduated Repayment is a repayment plan that DOESN’T have forgiveness, but you can qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) anyway. As long as you can certify your last 4 years of employment (might take you tracking down some HR people), you can qualify. Simply fill out the certification form here: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service
It's that simple.  What's even better is that your income could be low enough to qualify for zero or minimal repayment, at which your loan will be forgiven at the end. Yes, there may be tax consequences, but that shouldn't deter you from these programs. It is the best alternative if you can't afford your loans and you are looking for forgiveness options (and we discuss the taxes a bit at the end of the article).

Private student loan lenders want to ensure that you have sufficient income to repay your student loans. Lenders want proof that you have stable and recurring monthly income and cash flow. Examine your pay stubs and identify your after-tax monthly income. When you subtract your proposed monthly student loan payments, does a sufficient amount remain for other essential living expenses?
my loans are 72k and 3.5%. I am currently enrolled for the last two years under public service loan forgiveness. I do not qualify for IBR and am in the process of applying for PAYE. I have been paying my loans since 2007 but only under the PSLF since 2014. My question is..Is it worth it to stay under PSLF for another 8 years or switch back to a graduated payment plan for another 10 years that will give me lower payments. Which plan will result in the most loan forgiveness.
I recently applied for public loan forgivness program and was denied because one of my loans in consolidation was private (from the college). It was $2200 keeping me from being eligible. Is there anything I can do? All of my other loans were public and I met all other requirements. This loan was from 2002 and I consolidated in 2005. My original debt was well over 50K and I still owe 28K after paying on time since 2005. I can’t back out the $2200 loan and I will probably be dead if I refinance for another 25 years. I am a public school teacher (science) in a Title 1 school. Any other programs I can look at??
To jump off her question a little – I’m a former teacher turned SAHM homeschooling our three children. When applying annually for the REPAYE program, do I have to show that I’ve been searching for employment? Or is it enough to apply jointly with my husband and send in documentation for his income? I do not plan to job search or go back to work anytime soon as I intend to continue homeschooling. I’m just wondering how that choice will affect our eligibility for programs such as REPAYe. (My husband and I both have eligible federal student loans).
SoFi: Fixed rates from 3.46% APR to 5.98% APR (with AutoPay). Variable rates from 2.05% APR to 5.98% APR (with AutoPay). Interest rates on variable rate loans are capped at either 8.95% or 9.95% depending on term of loan. See APR examples and terms. Lowest variable rate of 2.05% APR assumes current 1 month LIBOR rate of 2.05% minus 0.15% margin minus 0.25% ACH discount. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. If approved for a loan, the fixed or variable interest rate offered will depend on your creditworthiness, and the term of the loan and other factors, and will be within the ranges of rates listed above. For the SoFi variable rate loan, the 1-month LIBOR index will adjust monthly and the loan payment will be re-amortized and may change monthly. APRs for variable rate loans may increase after origination if the LIBOR index increases. See eligibility details. The SoFi 0.25% AutoPay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account. *To check the rates and terms you qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit inquiry. Unlike hard credit inquiries, soft credit inquiries (or soft credit pulls) do not impact your credit score. Soft credit inquiries allow SoFi to show you what rates and terms SoFi can offer you up front. After seeing your rates, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit inquiry. Hard credit inquiries (or hard credit pulls) are required for SoFi to be able to issue you a loan. In addition to requiring your explicit permission, these credit pulls may impact your credit score. Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE.
Yes, you should rehabilitate your loans and get on an income-based repayment plan again. When on the plan, you might consider filing your taxes married filing separately. You need to talk to a tax professional and see if it makes sense, but if you do, they will only count your income for your loans (which is $0). That will make your payments $0. However, your husband will pay much more in taxes as a result, so it might not be worth it – you have to do the math. Here’s an article about that: IBR and Married Filing Separately.
I owe $62,000 in student loans that I consolidated with Fed Loan Servicing. I am currently paying them back and figure I will be paying on them forever. Some of this amount is due to a couple small forbearances. Over half of the amount that I owe is interest. That is the part that hurts. The amount of interest owed. I gladly will pay back the principal amount owed, but the interest is ridiculous and right now my entire payment goes to interest only. Is there any plan that forgives some of the interest owed? Or that would offer a better interest rate? My current rate is 7.25%. Thank you
You’re mixing up two different things. Graduated Repayment is a repayment plan that DOESN’T have forgiveness, but you can qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) anyway. As long as you can certify your last 4 years of employment (might take you tracking down some HR people), you can qualify. Simply fill out the certification form here: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service
I was called this morning from a loan company that calls me everyday but today I decided to answer. They told me they were from Allied Navient and wanted to take my loans from 35,428.06 to 2394.08. Is this a scam? The first person that I talked to when I answered seemed like he was paid to just break through the wall that I put up! The second person had my info and when I seemed interested in her offer she got me to a manager! He got on the phone and immediately took the offer to 1597.00 to put me in good standing? I have resources (friend) available to help but I don’t want to put him in that situation! He also wouldn’t give me the money until I researched to find out if I was getting scammed as he had never heard of that kind of offer!
Borrower, and Co-signer if applicable, must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident with a valid I-551 card (which must show a minimum of 10 years between “Resident Since” date and “Card Expires” date or has no expiration date); state that they are of at least borrowing age in the state of residence at the time of application; and meet Lender underwriting criteria (including, for example, employment, debt-to-income, disposable income, and credit history requirements).
All loans must be in grace or repayment status and cannot be in default.  Borrower must have graduated or be enrolled in good standing in the final term preceding graduation from an accredited Title IV U.S. school and must be employed, or have an eligible offer of employment.  Parents looking to refinance loans taken out on behalf of a child should refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for applicable terms and conditions.
Consolidating student loans via refinancing is best for people whose financial position - in terms of employment, cash flow, and credit - has improved since they graduated from school. People who are working in the public sector or taking advantage of federal debt relief programs such as income-based repayment or public service forgiveness may not want to refinance, as these programs do not transfer to private refinance loans.
I’ve read as many of the above comments as I could in order to avoid a repeat question, but couldn’t find any that directly addressed my situation. I’m scared to contact Direct Loans (all of my considerable undergrad and grad student loans are Federal loans), because I’ve been in default for so long. Just before I completed my Ph.D., two things happened. One: I became a mother with very bad post-partum depression, and Two: I had a nervous breakdown because my graduate advisor stole my work and sabotaged my ethnographic field study due to sheer incompetence. I didn’t fight any of it (see above references to total physical and emotional breakdowns), but instead focused on keeping myself and my children alive and in gradually improving health. It really was a survival situation. My husband has been our sole provider since I left graduate school (ABD), and I have not been employed outside the home since then. I have, however, homeschooled both of our children diligently and well, as well as run a small organic farm on one income. His income is barely enough for us to do this. It is certainly not enough for us to pay 15% of our income to loans, and so I am also exploring ways to use my education for income so that I can pay off loans. Like…write a bestseller. Yeah. (It’s actually not a total pipe dream. I do have one 600 page novel nearly finished, and it’s pretty damned good.) So my question is this: since none of my debt was incurred while married, and since I have not been employed since 2003, and since I DO very much want to repay my debt, but it pretty much seems completely hopeless, what can I do? What’s the best way to go forward here?
However, even if your payments are $0 per month, they WILL count toward your required 120 or 240 monthly payments to receive forgiveness. It sounds like you are probably going to have to make the entire 220 monthly payments, because I don’t think you could be qualifying for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program while you’re not working, but if you were injured on the job while working at a qualifying position… maybe?
I am not in default. My loans are subsidized and unsubsidized loans. I have a recent print out of my credit report and other than naming Nelnet as my holder and labeled as a subsidized/unsubsidized loan I don’t know what “kind” they are. From my recollection, and from what I can tell on my report, they are federal loans. My primary loans were for $21,000 and $23,000. My current balance is about $64,000 from my last online statement from Nelnet. I did notice that my interest is now at 3.5%. That was a happy surprise, however, I still owe that extra 50% of what I borrowed. Additionally, Nelnet recently decided on their own to put me on a forbearance. I never asked for that! I called and was told they could not stop the forbearance and I could simply continue to pay. I was stunned to say the least.
I just wanted to comment on how dedicated you are to helping people Robert. You have provided prompt clear responses, with impressive information to every single person who commented on your article. I will share this with friends. I was fortunate to be in healthcare/non-profit & have a Perkins loan that was forgiven after 5 years. Thank you for your dedication to your field & being such an amazing person to give your time to answer all these questions. Kudos to you!
Im so happy I found your site. I need help. I owe $270,000 in student loans from medical school. $60,000 of it is from private loans. Both my subsidized and unsubsidized federal loans have been in repayment for 10 years. My balance has actually gone up approx. $25,000. Due to interest and two short term forebearances. I discovered IBR plan last year and qualified, but this year i will not qualify. Im stuck and feel like I will be paying this well beyond retirement years. Im 40 yrs old.
CommonBond: Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.19% effective August 10, 2019.
Great information, but I have a question. I had to consolidate my loans since they were not with a federal loan servicer. I am starting to repay my loans, ($200K). I have been working the last 17 years for local governments in my area. Is it true I have to be making payments at the same time I am working for the loan governments or it does not count for loan forgiveness under Public Service Forgiveness program? I am nearing retirement and this could be a problem.
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So i have about $65k in federal loans and $20k in private student loan debt. I have worked for a non-profit for over 9 years and I had hopes that I would qualify for student loan forgiveness after getting confirmation that my employer was a certified employer under the student loan forgiveness program. Well it turns out i’ve made over 10 years of payments and i was on the wrong payment plan and i also consolidated in 2016 so i have to start all over with the 120 payments. I don’t plan to work here for another 10 years so i am extremely disappointed i didn’t know this information earlier. I now switched to IBR and my payments are $0. It’s my understanding that under IBR your payments are forgiven after 25 years. So since i’ve made over 10 years of payments already (under another payment plan) does this count towards the 25 years or does it start all over since i just got on IBR? I guess i want to know when my 25 year mark would be.
Hello Robert, I recently read your post about FedLoan servicing which is my student loan servicer. I am a recent grad and my loans have just exited their grace period. I have been in the process for about 2 months now to try and switch to a pay as you earn or an income based plan. My application is in, but have not heard about processing. Any advice on how to achieve and get news about this with FedLoan servicing?
After loan disbursement, if a borrower documents a qualifying economic hardship, we may agree in our discretion to allow for full or partial forbearance of payments for one or more 3-month time periods (not to exceed 12 months in the aggregate during the term of your loan), provided that we receive acceptable documentation (including updating documentation) of the nature and expected duration of the borrower’s economic hardship.
Like other forms of debt, you can refinance a student loan (both private student loans and federal student loans are eligible for refinancing). With most lenders, you start with a rate estimate, which doesn’t require a hard credit inquiry. When comparing rates from different lenders, be sure to pay attention to additional key differences, such as fees, before making a final decision (Earnest has no fees, for what it’s worth). The next step is to submit an application, and provide any additional required verification, such as IDs or pay stubs. Once you’re approved, you sign a few documents and indicate the loans you’d like to refinance. Your new lender will pay off these old loans, and voila, you have a shiny new refinanced student loan.
I had to file to drop my classes because I was in bed rest for four months. I was told that since it was a medical emergency that I wouldn’t be expected to pay back any student aid that I received and I could continue once I was off bed rest. When I tried to go back I was told that I had to pay off my loan first. So I did. Then I was told that another loan had been taken out in my name. The address that they claimed the check was delivered to has never been my address, nor have I ever lived there. It was the address of an estranged sibling that I have had no contact with. I explained this, but I was told that I still have to pay the loan or my transcripts would be held hostage so that I could never go back to college anywhere. The advisor that they appointed me when I first enrolled had been fired, so I found a new one who worked for the state. He tried to help me sort things out. On one conference call they told him that a loan had been sent to the fore mentioned address, on another they claimed that I had outstanding fines from aid money that I needed to repay. We called the office that handles all student aid info and they said that I do not owe them money and if I did then it would be between me and the state, not the school. So we called them again and again they claimed that I had taken out a second loan. The new advisor said he’d never seen anything like it and he said that I still qualify for a full scholarship if I can get my transcripts released. I don’t have the money to pay the loan back twice. It took me years to pay it back the first time. Any ideas? I’ve tried just about everything, including reporting it on the FBI’s identity theft site.

I have loans before 2007. My lender advised that I go through REPAYE. Because I’m getting married in 2016, I’d rather go under PAYE (in order to file married but seperate). If I consolidate my loans (which I’ve also been advised to do perhaps because some are Stafford and REPAYE doesn’t cover those???), would I then qualify for PAYE? What other benefits/consquences are there to consolidating loans?

LendKey: Refinancing via LendKey.com is only available for applicants with qualified private education loans from an eligible institution. Loans that were used for exam preparation classes, including, but not limited to, loans for LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, and GRE preparation, are not eligible for refinancing with a lender via LendKey.com. If you currently have any of these exam preparation loans, you should not include them in an application to refinance your student loans on this website. Applicants must be either U.S. citizens or Permanent Residents in an eligible state to qualify for a loan. Certain membership requirements (including the opening of a share account and any applicable association fees in connection with membership) may apply in the event that an applicant wishes to accept a loan offer from a credit union lender. Lenders participating on LendKey.com reserve the right to modify or discontinue the products, terms, and benefits offered on this website at any time without notice. LendKey Technologies, Inc. is not affiliated with, nor does it endorse, any educational institution.
Terms and Conditions apply. Splash reserves the right to modify or discontinue products and benefits at any time without notice. Rates and terms are also subject to change at any time without notice. Offers are subject to credit approval. To qualify, a borrower must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident in an eligible state and meet applicable underwriting requirements. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. Lowest rates are reserved for the highest qualified borrowers.
So i have about $65k in federal loans and $20k in private student loan debt. I have worked for a non-profit for over 9 years and I had hopes that I would qualify for student loan forgiveness after getting confirmation that my employer was a certified employer under the student loan forgiveness program. Well it turns out i’ve made over 10 years of payments and i was on the wrong payment plan and i also consolidated in 2016 so i have to start all over with the 120 payments. I don’t plan to work here for another 10 years so i am extremely disappointed i didn’t know this information earlier. I now switched to IBR and my payments are $0. It’s my understanding that under IBR your payments are forgiven after 25 years. So since i’ve made over 10 years of payments already (under another payment plan) does this count towards the 25 years or does it start all over since i just got on IBR? I guess i want to know when my 25 year mark would be.
I went through a state-funded program for vocational rehabilitation. The state’s classified me with a disability but I chose to get rehabilitated rather than go on SSI. Here’s the two part question. Based on this info would I still qualify as disabled even though I don’t collect Ssi ? And second I noticed that the school that the state put me through charged me $27,000 for that six months of training I can’t seem to get proof that I wasn’t supposed to be Billed. I think there’s fraud here but I can’t seem to prove it is there anything I can do in either case?
I have significant amount of loans. I applied for a repayment plan and was told I did not qualify for Paye because I had loans before 2007 so I was out on REPaye. My partner and I are now thinking of getting married (so I can get his medical insurance benefits) but I just read that under REPaye they always look at your joint income even if you’re married filing separate. Can I change my payment plan to IBR so only my AGI would be taken into consideration? I’ve only made 6 qualifying thus far. Also, would IBR increase or decrease my current payment? I’m hoping the repayment plans are not permanent. We are also speaking to our tax person to see what specific pros/cons us potentially getting married will have on our financial situation. I know they are several cons so we are weighing out our options of getting married now or until I’m down with PSLF. -Thank you
I have student loans about 28000 and did finish my degree due to the depression and OCD which I had since I was born plus 3 years ago my dad become disable due to the stroke which currently disable and no job. I had to quite my collage and staying with him to help him daily. No degree and no job only had 4100 Last year. What should I do and how can I pay the loan. Is there any forgiven loan program. Any recommendation which can help me please
If Lender agrees (in its sole discretion) to postpone or reduce any monthly payment(s) for a period of time, interest on the loan will continue to accrue for each day principal is owed. Although the borrower might not be required to make payments during such a period, the borrower may continue to make payments during such a period. Making payments, or paying some of the interest, will reduce the total amount that will be required to be paid over the life of the loan. Interest not paid during any period when Lender has agreed to postpone or reduce any monthly payment will be added to the principal balance through capitalization (compounding) at the end of such a period, one month before the borrower is required to resume making regular monthly payments.
Earnest: To qualify, you must be a U.S. citizen or possess a 10-year (non-conditional) Permanent Resident Card, reside in a state Earnest lends in, and satisfy our minimum eligibility criteria. You may find more information on loan eligibility here: https://www.earnest.com/eligibility. Not all applicants will be approved for a loan, and not all applicants will qualify for the lowest rate. Approval and interest rate depend on the review of a complete application.

I have two graduate school loans from 2010 to 2013 – Stafford Loan and Grad Plus loan. I am currently enrolled in the pay as you earn program but am confused on the “loan forgiveness” opportunities. If I am not working in a public sector; can I still qualify for the 10 year forgiveness or does that automatically place me in the 25 year category? Also, am I responsible for taxes on the amount that is forgiven after 10 or 25 (whichever is applicable to my situation)?
I’m concerned about changes in loan information and the status of civil service enrollment. It appears purported loan was sold to Navient but the balances don’t match and there is no original balance, lender or name of school. When I went to get job training I was denied because the government had no record of my civil service registration from the 80’s. In order to get student loans this was necessary. I paid off loans from my BA but loans from private technical college have the issues. Can I have Navient verify the debt and address civil service and training issues?
Laurel Road began originating student loans in 2013 and has since helped thousands of professionals with undergraduate and postgraduate degrees consolidate and refinance more than $4 billion in federal and private school loans. Laurel Road also offers a suite of online graduate school loan products and personal loans that help simplify lending through customized technology and personalized service. In April 2019, Laurel Road was acquired by KeyBank, one of the nation’s largest bank-based financial services companies. Laurel Road is a brand of KeyBank National Association offering online lending products in all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.  All loans are provided by KeyBank National Association, a nationally chartered bank.  Member FDIC.  For more information, visit www.laurelroad.com.

4This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a refi borrower with a Full Principal & Interest Repayment and a 10-year repayment term, has a $40,000 loan and a 5.5% Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $434.11 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $52,092.61. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary.
You job qualifies you, but the graduated repayment program does not until your graduated payment exceeds your 10-year standard payment (which typically doesn’t happen until the last few years of repayment). You need to switch repayment plans to standard 10-year, IBR, PAYE, RePAYE, or ICR – then you need to see if you’ll even have a balance left after 10 years.

I am currently on IBR repayment plan and have been now for 2 years. I am in my 5 year of teaching. When do I apply for Public Loan Forgiveness? Is it after I have taught 10 years? What if I take a year off due to having a child, will that affect my 10 years of working for the Public loan forgiveness? Also when would my loans be forgiven? I have tried speaking with rep from fed loan however I feel that I am even more confused than before. What exactly do I need to do to have loans forgiven?
CommonBond: Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.19% effective August 10, 2019.
Like other forms of debt, you can refinance a student loan (both private student loans and federal student loans are eligible for refinancing). With most lenders, you start with a rate estimate, which doesn’t require a hard credit inquiry. When comparing rates from different lenders, be sure to pay attention to additional key differences, such as fees, before making a final decision (Earnest has no fees, for what it’s worth).
First let me say thank you for this article and all the helpful advice. Originally I owed a little over 40k when I graduated back in 1998. I got some deferments and then I went into default. Govt takes my tax return and applies it to my loan repayment. Twice I tried to make arrangements to pay…first time I was told to “wait it out until I get a good offer to pay pennies on the dollar” the second time I was told that I needed to make a payment that I just couldn’t afford… I offered $100 a month until i had better cashflow and the guy laughed at me and told me that would be worthless.

In 1994, I started at ITT. I applied for CAD, I thought I was going to take classes for CAD. Then I was told I tested higher in Electronics and I wld make more money in that field. I was 22 at the time, just married and had a child. So, I went with it. I was lied to from the beginning. I was only in the school 3 months at best. I have had hardship most of my adult life. Stuggling to make ends meet. I originally had my loan through William D Ford Direct Loans. I belive my loan was only 2k to start. Now its at 18k. I kept putting on a deferment. I explained about my hardship. This is what was recommended. Now my loan is at Navient..They want me to pay on this for 25 yrs and then they will give me a loan forgiveness. I’ll probably be be dead by then. Is their any way I can get a forgiveness on this loan now?


Once you apply, it can take from 30 to 45 days to process. During that time, we complete the credit review process, you (and your cosigner, if applicable) will sign the loan documents and we will ask you to obtain payoff statements from your current loan servicers. If you prefer, we can schedule a call with you and your current loan servicer(s) to verify the loans you want to consolidate.
We are a family of 5 with one income – my wife went back to school a couple of years ago. My income has risen in very small amounts over the past 5 years but not enough to even pay the interest let alone the principal. I can keep doing the IBR program and watch the interest continue to drive the loan amount through the roof — but I am hoping you know of something better, some way to stop the madness.
Thank you so much for the article and all your advice given. I’ve worked in public service for 6 years, but quit my job 2 years ago and am now unemployed. I’ve been paying my student loan for over 10 years now and was curious if I could take advantage of the public service program forgiveness even though I’m not currently employed. Thank you in advance!
I graduated back in 1991. In 92 or 93 I consolidated about $23,000 dollars in student debt with Sallie Mae. Over the next several years I had to do Forbearance a few times but by 2008 I had made about $51,000 in payments and had a balance of around $27,000. The economy crashed and the non-profit I worked for had to drop my income – a lot. We had to short-sell our house. I picked up some side work and eventually left the non-profit (501c3) in 2010. I took another job and essentially started over from a career standpoint.
In short, refinancing student loans generally does not hurt your credit. When getting your initial rate estimate, all that’s required is a ’soft credit inquiry,’ which doesn’t affect your credit score at all. Once you determine which lender has the best offer (Earnest, we hope), you’ll complete a full application. This application does require a ‘hard credit inquiry,’ which can have a minor credit impact (typically a few points).

Hi! Just a few days ago I got an offer about consolidating my student loans. I go through Navient and they said that I qualify for student loan forgiveness. However, it was not Navient offering this to me. They said they were Student Services based out of Newport Beach, California. However, they said I would need to pay $245 to start the consolidation fee and pay another $97 for the next 3 months before my payments would drop down to $75 a month.
I am currently on IBR repayment plan and have been now for 2 years. I am in my 5 year of teaching. When do I apply for Public Loan Forgiveness? Is it after I have taught 10 years? What if I take a year off due to having a child, will that affect my 10 years of working for the Public loan forgiveness? Also when would my loans be forgiven? I have tried speaking with rep from fed loan however I feel that I am even more confused than before. What exactly do I need to do to have loans forgiven?
Tim, I took out loans under similar circumstances. I know the loans were federal but I have no idea what the program was. I know they weren’t Perkins loans and I’m not sure if they were Stafford loans or not but I think they were. The loans were serviced by SalieMae from inception starting around 1994. I moved out of forbearance, consolidated the loan to a 25 year repayment plan and have made every payment since September of 2004. I’ve also been a public sector (state) employee since 2002. I’m having trouble determining if my loans qualify. The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program stipulates that “only loans you received under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program are eligible for PSLF.” I’ve never heard of the program and assume it was created concurrent or subsequent to the inception of this program in 2007. Does that mean I am only eligible if I took out the original loans, or consolidated my loans after a certain date?

My wife has two Navient loans. She was making regular payments but her principal kept growing. They would be months when none of her money was applied to principal even though she paid every thirty days. Then she would get a whopping accrued interest bill. We went to several agencies including CFPF protesting. They would ask Navient for a reply and accept anything Navient said and close the case.
I’ve read as many of the above comments as I could in order to avoid a repeat question, but couldn’t find any that directly addressed my situation. I’m scared to contact Direct Loans (all of my considerable undergrad and grad student loans are Federal loans), because I’ve been in default for so long. Just before I completed my Ph.D., two things happened. One: I became a mother with very bad post-partum depression, and Two: I had a nervous breakdown because my graduate advisor stole my work and sabotaged my ethnographic field study due to sheer incompetence. I didn’t fight any of it (see above references to total physical and emotional breakdowns), but instead focused on keeping myself and my children alive and in gradually improving health. It really was a survival situation. My husband has been our sole provider since I left graduate school (ABD), and I have not been employed outside the home since then. I have, however, homeschooled both of our children diligently and well, as well as run a small organic farm on one income. His income is barely enough for us to do this. It is certainly not enough for us to pay 15% of our income to loans, and so I am also exploring ways to use my education for income so that I can pay off loans. Like…write a bestseller. Yeah. (It’s actually not a total pipe dream. I do have one 600 page novel nearly finished, and it’s pretty damned good.) So my question is this: since none of my debt was incurred while married, and since I have not been employed since 2003, and since I DO very much want to repay my debt, but it pretty much seems completely hopeless, what can I do? What’s the best way to go forward here?

Splash Financial: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.50% APR to 7.03% APR and Variable Rates range from 2.43% APR to 7.76% APR. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. Fixed rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 6.49% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.59% to 6.54% for a 8-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.79% per year to 6.59% per year for a 12-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). Variable rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 3.69% per year to 5.72% per year for a 8-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.47% per year to 6.36% per year for a 12-year term, 4.50% per year to 7.76% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. Variable interest rates will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. The maximum variable rate on the student refinance loan is 9.00% for 5-year, 7-year, 8-year and 10-year terms, and 10.00% for 12-year, 15-year and 20-year terms. The floor rate is 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.

i had a student loan that i got before i got married , my husband has been filing me on his taxes for almost nine years now and just so happen the us department of education took part of his taxes last year. we were told that if i didnt earn an income that they could not take his taxes because that would b against the law because i didnt earn it. is that true? and if so how can i get his money back cause they sed they can not give it back


Their seems to be no provision made to forgive student loans at the time of 9/11 and the years following when so many middle class families who were and still are, bearing the brunt of supporting the economy and cities by continuing to pay taxes even when the lower income are not required to. Most middle class families took student loans and lost everything after 9/11.
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