The Know Before You Owe Initiative – To ensure that graduates aren’t saddled with excessive monthly payments that would surely put them in the bread line, President Obama committed to offering them the ability to cap monthly student loan payments at just 10% of discretionary income, a move that would save some borrowers hundreds to thousands of dollars per month
My 120 qualifying payments could take me 20+ years to eventually make if I let it. With the NHSC program, the requirements are much more specific, rural area, two year commitment, etc. I am interested in potentially applying for the NHSC program as well. I know that the two programs work differently and I am wondering if you know whether or not they could be used simultaneously? Are you aware of whether or not this has this been done before?
Along with your credit score and annual income, some lenders also look at your savings and debt-to-income ratio. Finally, some lenders require proof of graduation, as they’ll only approve borrowers who have obtained their degree. If you left school before graduating, there are relatively few student loan refinance providers that will work with you.

So i have about $65k in federal loans and $20k in private student loan debt. I have worked for a non-profit for over 9 years and I had hopes that I would qualify for student loan forgiveness after getting confirmation that my employer was a certified employer under the student loan forgiveness program. Well it turns out i’ve made over 10 years of payments and i was on the wrong payment plan and i also consolidated in 2016 so i have to start all over with the 120 payments. I don’t plan to work here for another 10 years so i am extremely disappointed i didn’t know this information earlier. I now switched to IBR and my payments are $0. It’s my understanding that under IBR your payments are forgiven after 25 years. So since i’ve made over 10 years of payments already (under another payment plan) does this count towards the 25 years or does it start all over since i just got on IBR? I guess i want to know when my 25 year mark would be.
I graduated back in 1991. In 92 or 93 I consolidated about $23,000 dollars in student debt with Sallie Mae. Over the next several years I had to do Forbearance a few times but by 2008 I had made about $51,000 in payments and had a balance of around $27,000. The economy crashed and the non-profit I worked for had to drop my income – a lot. We had to short-sell our house. I picked up some side work and eventually left the non-profit (501c3) in 2010. I took another job and essentially started over from a career standpoint.
I just wanted to comment on how dedicated you are to helping people Robert. You have provided prompt clear responses, with impressive information to every single person who commented on your article. I will share this with friends. I was fortunate to be in healthcare/non-profit & have a Perkins loan that was forgiven after 5 years. Thank you for your dedication to your field & being such an amazing person to give your time to answer all these questions. Kudos to you!
I graduated in 2003, joined military (national guard) in 2005 in order to get student loan payments paid off. In between that time they tacked on an extra 10k. After all this time of making 300.00 payments a month I am no closer to paying off these loans. I consolidated them in 2004, and that 3rd party company added the money wrongfully. I served two tours overseas. Do I have any options?
I have had a student loan since 1990 when I was 17years old. It started out as a $3500 and today (27 years later) I owe $4500 – how is this possible? I remember 2 years ago i was scheduled to receive $2600 back in federal taxes and they took it all….I have attended college 3 times and I know that had to have been in good standing as well as in deferment so how can i owe more now than I did when I got the loan? I am currently in a rehabilitation program paying $5 a month but the interest continues to grow I will never get out from underneath this gray cloud. Believe me if I had the money I would pay it. I owe peanuts compared to some. Why are they allowed to have the interest accrue on a school loan. Just seems wrong.
After reading all the comments above I am extremely worried for my daughter who will be going off to college next year. The school she will be attending is a private Christian college, after scholarships she will have some debts. What types of loans should she get? There are so many I’m totally confused. I would like to help her make the right decisions from the beginning so she doesn’t go through what others are suffering.
In short, refinancing student loans generally does not hurt your credit. When getting your initial rate estimate, all that’s required is a ’soft credit inquiry,’ which doesn’t affect your credit score at all. Once you determine which lender has the best offer (Earnest, we hope), you’ll complete a full application. This application does require a ‘hard credit inquiry,’ which can have a minor credit impact (typically a few points). However, in the months and years after refinancing, your credit score should see steady improvement as you make on-time payments and pay down your debt.
Once you apply, it can take from 30 to 45 days to process. During that time, we complete the credit review process, you (and your cosigner, if applicable) will sign the loan documents and we will ask you to obtain payoff statements from your current loan servicers. If you prefer, we can schedule a call with you and your current loan servicer(s) to verify the loans you want to consolidate.
I have an associate in nursing with student loans from a school that promised accreditation and never got it, so they changed the name and got accredited then. Whats frustrating to me is there are only limited places I am able to work for so many years due to them not being accredited. I have to pay these loans back, and I’m wondering what is the best option to do.
Also, I am currently back in school and now have federal loans that are deferred while I’m enrolled, but I want to understand what the best thing to do is once I graduate and have to start paying those back as well. I have felt a little lost in this process and don’t know where to turn/who to ask for advice, especially with the private loans and the balance that won’t go down. I appreciate any advice.
Your credit score is a barometer of your financial responsibility. Most lenders evaluate your credit score (or its underlying components), and want to ensure that you meet your financial obligations and have a history of on-time payments. Generally, top lenders expect a minimum credit score in the mid to high 600's, while others do not have a minimum.
Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE. To qualify, a borrower must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident in an eligible state and meet SoFi's underwriting requirements. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. To qualify for the lowest rate, you must have a responsible financial history and meet other conditions. If approved, your actual rate will be within the range of rates listed above and will depend on a variety of factors, including term of loan, a responsible financial history, years of experience, income and other factors. Rates and Terms are subject to change at anytime without notice and are subject to state restrictions. SoFi refinance loans are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that the federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment or PAYE. Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Financing Law License No. 6054612. SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Lending Corp., NMLS # 1121636. (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org)
Total and permanent disability discharge. If you cannot work due to being totally and permanently disabled, physically or mentally, you may qualify to have your remaining student loan debt canceled. To be eligible, you’ll need to provide documentation proving your disability. Once your loans are discharged, the government may monitor your finances and disability for three years. If you don’t meet requirements during the monitoring period, your loans may be reinstated. Details on the application process are available at disabilitydischarge.com.
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