State-sponsored repayment assistance programs. Licensed teachers, nurses, doctors and lawyers in certain states may be able to take advantage of programs to assist with repaying debt. For example, the Mississippi Teacher Loan Repayment Program will pay up to $3,000 per year for a maximum of four years on undergraduate educational loans to teachers with a specific teaching license for each year of teaching full time in a particular geographical or subject area. Contact your state’s higher education department to find out if you qualify for a program.
Good Morning Robert, I did an (Obama) forgivness loan agreement with NationalStudentCenter.com 1(866)359-3821. Currently unemployed and said I qualified for my loans to be consolidated and reduced all the way to $0 for the next 20-30 month with the first 3months being $197.33. Paid thru my checking and already one month in. The wierd thing is I had to Esign the App so they can move forward with the process. I received an email from NelNet saying that they received my App. But I never Esigned the App because I started to become skeptical about the loan. With the info that I just provided you, can your expertise tell me if this is a scam? If so how do I get out of it.
For eligible Associates degrees in the healthcare field (see Eligibility & Eligible Loans section below), Lender will refinance up to $50,000 in loans for non-ParentPlus refinance loans. Note, parents who are refinancing loans taken out on behalf of a child who has obtained an associates degrees in an eligible healthcare field are not subject to the $50,000 loan maximum, refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for more information about refinancing ParentPlus loans.
For details on how this program works, you definitely need to visit my page on the Borrower’s Defense Against Repayment Program, but because the system is so complicated, and can take so long to get an approval or denial response, this is one situation where I recommend that EVERYONE hires a student loan expert for assistance in preparing the application.
Annual Percentage Rates (APR), loan term and monthly payments are estimated based on analysis of information provided by you, data provided by lenders, and publicly available information. All loan information is presented without warranty, and the estimated APR and other terms are not binding in any way. Lenders provide loans with a range of APRs depending on borrowers' credit and other factors. Keep in mind that only borrowers with excellent credit will qualify for the lowest rate available. Your actual APR will depend on factors like credit score, requested loan amount, loan term, and credit history. All loans are subject to credit review and approval.
Graduates may refinance any unsubsidized or subsidized Federal or private student loan that was used exclusively for qualified higher education expenses (as defined in 26 USC Section 221) at an accredited U.S. undergraduate or graduate school. Any federal loans refinanced with Lender are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment.
Designed to help you understand how consolidation will affect each of your loans, our detailed loan review process will provide you with the in-depth information you need in order to make an informed decision about which loans you want to consolidate and which loans you may want to leave out. You can reach out to your Student Loan Consultant at any point during the process.
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I currently owe 385,000 in student loans. My loans are a combination of undergraduate, law school and and LL.M degree. All of these loans are also at varying interest rates, from 5.8-8.5 and dating back to 2003. They are all federal and are direct, ffel, etc. One of the things I don’t understand is interest. I am currently on IBR which makes my payments affordable. But unfortunately I don’t make enough money to put a dent in the principal. Although my goal is to make more money, I just had the interest on my loan capitalized to the current amount because I did not recertify my IBR on time (this is my first year on IBR). I applied for reinstatement of IBR so I am waiting on approval. My question is, hypothetically if I am not able to increase my salary significantly enough to put a dent in the principal, will I owe BOTH the principal and the unpaid interest at the end of the 25 year term? And what happens to the unpaid interest while I am in repayment?
Their seems to be no provision made to forgive student loans at the time of 9/11 and the years following when so many middle class families who were and still are, bearing the brunt of supporting the economy and cities by continuing to pay taxes even when the lower income are not required to. Most middle class families took student loans and lost everything after 9/11.
Good Morning Robert, I did an (Obama) forgivness loan agreement with NationalStudentCenter.com 1(866)359-3821. Currently unemployed and said I qualified for my loans to be consolidated and reduced all the way to $0 for the next 20-30 month with the first 3months being $197.33. Paid thru my checking and already one month in. The wierd thing is I had to Esign the App so they can move forward with the process. I received an email from NelNet saying that they received my App. But I never Esigned the App because I started to become skeptical about the loan. With the info that I just provided you, can your expertise tell me if this is a scam? If so how do I get out of it.
I have been on the IBR plan, and now have payments I can’t make — due to the fact that I have two special needs children whose monthly expenses exceed $800 (one is Type 1 diabetic and one is on ABA for autism.) According to my loan servicer, the only option at this point is to consolidate. This is really frustrating. I have tried my best to do what is needed, but now I am getting to the point where even though my husband and I are both making decent money, we are having to choose between food and paying student loans, since not getting insulin is off the table obviously. We have exhausted the limits for putting off payments. I am simply hoping to keep everything together at this point, but my frustration and stress level about it is just through the roof. Ugh. I owe, about 90K, my husband about 10K. We both have master’s degrees and work in the public sector (me at a public school district, him at a state university.) We also live in the SF Bay Area, which is expensive — but we would be getting paid a fraction of what we make now with pathetic health benefits (to say nothing of hospital/dr access) if we were to move.
I am conflicted bc after reading your articles I feel like it will still make more sense for me to switch plans (in order to pay 10% of income as opposed to 15% monthly and bc I have not paid much off my debt thus far in a few years). However, my family has advised me that I need to see real numbers to know how much I will owe when my loans are forgiven in 25 years when my taxes are due. In my head adding an extra $35k to my $206k balance will be just the same when those taxes are due-seemingly impossible. But it is true that I do not know how to calculate the actual numbers to have a better idea of what kind of added interest the added $35k will make to my total that will be forgiven in 25yrs which I will then owe in taxes.
I have two loans outstanding : 1) original in Jan 1997 from Sallie Mae and 2) original 2012 from Navy Federal. I am a nurse practitioner and cannot figure out how middle class people are supposed to qualify for these federal loan dismissal programs. I have been in graduate school for past 3 years paying as I go along. What is left for me to do to get these paid off or forgiven? Very frustrating to say the least.
My father was a policeman, killed in the line of duty, when I was fifteen years old. I am the oldest of six children. We have not had the help of a faher or mother to make things easier through my husband’s layoffs, etc. With three children I got tired of our financial sinking so, unfortunately, decided to go to college to make things better. At age 50 I received my bachelor’s degree, and graduated Magna Cum Laude. After being used and abused as a substitute for over 10 years, I could see I was too old and didn’t have a “rich” name to get in. Finally, I decided they could not stop me from making more income, so I drove 110 miles a day into a snow belt to college and worked two part time jobs, as I suffered through the stress of getting a Master’s Degree in Education. I worked for awhile as an adjunct professor and am now retired at 70. I still owe about $11,000 at the ridiculous rate of 6.25%. I have had deferments, but paid ahead when I could, to stay in good grace with Nelnet. Is there any chance of a loan forgiveness now that my retirement is only $380.00 a month, plus monthly social security of $700.00??? Could I get a forgiveness since I have been paying since 1998 and/or because my father was a policeman killed in the line of duty(and an army veteran)? (The original two loans were serviced through the bank and then given to Nelnet [which I did not authorize??]. I paid off my Master’s degree loan first because the loan was less, but the interest was higher.)
I had a 47,000 student loan from 1997. In 2008 I was a substitute teacher and was not able to get any kind of loan adjustments to save my home. I have since stayed with various relatives and today I received a letter from a debt collector stating that the loan has been turned over to them. The last time I moved I was able to get work as a substitute teacher again. School has just begun so I am not working yet. The letter says that I now owe almost 90,000. $40,000 has been added to my loan. What should I do and do I qualify for any kind of loan forgiveness. How is it different since, it has been turned over to a debt collector.
I have $60,000 in student loan debt from becoming a counselor, I was on the Public service forgiveness program on the IBR plan working at a social service agency, I made 5 years of qualifying payments but I recently left to go into private practice so I wouldn’t have to deal with insurance companies and productivity requirements, but I am assuming now being self employed, although I am doing the same kind off work, that this employment will no longer qualify for public service forgiveness, is this correct? Any suggestions on how to navigate this?

Through my current employer, many of the other therapists have applied for and have been awarded loan forgiveness monies through the National Health Services Corps (NHSC) Loan Repayment Program. As I understand it, these two programs work differently and I am trying to figure out whether or not they can be used simultaneously. The NHSC information says that I can’t have another “service obligation” or that service obligation needs to be finished, terminated, completed by the application deadline.


Tim, I took out loans under similar circumstances. I know the loans were federal but I have no idea what the program was. I know they weren’t Perkins loans and I’m not sure if they were Stafford loans or not but I think they were. The loans were serviced by SalieMae from inception starting around 1994. I moved out of forbearance, consolidated the loan to a 25 year repayment plan and have made every payment since September of 2004. I’ve also been a public sector (state) employee since 2002. I’m having trouble determining if my loans qualify. The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program stipulates that “only loans you received under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program are eligible for PSLF.” I’ve never heard of the program and assume it was created concurrent or subsequent to the inception of this program in 2007. Does that mean I am only eligible if I took out the original loans, or consolidated my loans after a certain date?
Graduates may refinance any unsubsidized or subsidized Federal or private student loan that was used exclusively for qualified higher education expenses (as defined in 26 USC Section 221) at an accredited U.S. undergraduate or graduate school. Any federal loans refinanced with Lender are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment.
Student loan forgiveness for nurses. Nurses shouldering student debt have several options for student loan forgiveness: Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Perkins loan cancellation, and the NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program, which pays up to 85% of qualified nurses’ unpaid college debt. Public Service Loan Forgiveness may be the most likely option for most nurses — few borrowers have Perkins loans, and the NURSE Corps program is highly competitive.
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