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I went to Everest College for Court Reporting in 2007-2008. I did not graduate, but chose to leave after I slowly realizing I was in real danger of being scammed by the school. How the entire program operated just didn’t seem right, and I didn’t feel that I had been told the truth about the success rate upon graduation, or that my education with them was up to par. However, I had already racked up several federal loans because we were called into student aid every 3-4 weeks in-between classes to renew our loans in order to continue to even the next class that day! After about 10 months I knew I had to leave, but these loan amounts due from that time have persisted. The school was closed in 2015 or 2016 I believe, after I was long gone. Do I qualify for loan dismissal/forgiveness?
I would recommend you call the for-profit company called the Student Loan Relief Helpline. Please do note that this is not a free service, and it’s not a Government Service, but a profit-driven organization that helps people reduce their monthly payments and find out how to qualify for loan forgiveness benefits. You can reach them here: 1-888-694-8235.

I would just like to acknowledge your continued support and communication to the people who come to this site in search of answers – sometimes desperate, usually in despair, or incredibly stressed how to unearth the mountain of debt they’re under (including myself). I see this long thread of messages and I am astounded by your commitment to help nearly everyone that shares their story. So, short story long, THANK YOU for your work in bringing people direction, comfort, and help when they have no where else to turn. Even if you don’t receive much thanks, you are very much appreciated.
Refinancing student loans makes sense for many people if they are eligible. For starters, student loan consolidation (which is included in the student loan refinancing process) simplifies the management of your monthly payments. Refinancing allows you to consolidate both your federal and private loans, select a repayment term that makes sense for you, and often lower your interest rate. Here at Earnest, the entire application process is online, and you could have your new low interest rate loan in less than a week. Borrowers who refinance federal student loans should be aware of the repayment options that they are giving up. For example, Earnest does not offer income-based repayment plans or Public Service Loan Forgiveness. It’s possible to consolidate federal student loans (Federal Perkins, Direct subsidized, Direct unsubsidized, and Direct PLUS loans) with a Direct Consolidation Loan from the Department of Education, but this will not allow you to lower your interest rate and private student loans are not eligible.
Military personnel continue to have access to some of the best Federal student loan forgiveness benefits, with options for using programs like the incredible Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program (which they qualify for as Military Personnel, or Government Employees), or the amazing College Loan Repayment Programs, which offer up to $65,000 in forgiveness to eligible service members.
Peace Corps volunteers are eligible to apply for Stafford, Perkins and Consolidation loans deferment, as well as partial cancellations of Perkins Loans (at 15% for each year of service, up to a maximum of 70% in total loan Perkins Loans forgiveness for service). For more information, contact the Peace Corps at 1-800-424-8580, or visit the Peace Corps website here.
I took out Federal loans, Perkins and Stafford Loans. Sallie Mae now handles them and consolidated my loans. I borrowed money for this education beginning in 1990. Interest has accumulated and as of today, I am not employed. I have filed forbearances, deferments, etc. and I keep accumulating interest and making no payments. I am wondering if I can qualify for “forgiveness” on this debt. It is now around $29,000.
My husband and I have only been married for 4 years. He is 49 and I am 42. He has 4 kids but 2 only in high school, one in college, and one just went through Marine boot camp training for the Nat. Reserves. He is a CRNA making 135K paying $1500 in child support (joint custody). I am a teacher (7th full year), with 2 children receive zero child support (joint custody). He has $225K loan debt and I have $125K loan debt. The last two years we filed separately and on the IBR program. This helped him because his was originally a Graduated plan. At this time he pays $600 on one loan and $200 on another loan(I believe it is the private loan). I pay $0 now based on this plan.
I have $129,000 in debt from school loans. However, I had surgery and almost died during the time I was in school. I got behind on my dissertation and was kicked out of school. My forbearance time is coming up. I am scheduled under federal loans for the income driven repayment. Is there any recourse? My loans are consolidated and up to date right now.

Quick question. I am an officer in the military, so to my understanding most replayment or forgiveness plans won’t work for me (not enlisted). Is there any plans for officers. I have a PhD and accured quite a bit of debt to attain it. Previously in deferrment because of additional army training, now I am required to pay it back but there is so much. Is there anything that I can do to have this forgiven or paid off by other means?


Terms and Conditions apply. Splash reserves the right to modify or discontinue products and benefits at any time without notice. Rates and terms are also subject to change at any time without notice. Offers are subject to credit approval. To qualify, a borrower must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident in an eligible state and meet applicable underwriting requirements. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. Lowest rates are reserved for the highest qualified borrowers.
Right now, you aren’t eligible for the reduced loan forgiveness benefit (forgiveness after 20 years), since your loans are older than October 1st, 2007. You should be eligible for forgiveness after 25 years of payments in 2022 though, and if they remove the qualification regarding age of the loan, then you may end up qualifying for complete forgiveness earlier.
Variable rate, based on the one-month London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") published in The Wall Street Journal on the twenty-fifth day, or the next business day, of the preceding calendar month. As of October 1, 2019, the one-month LIBOR rate is 2.05%. Variable interest rates range from 2.25%- 9.24% (2.25%-9.24% APR) and will fluctuate over the term of the borrower's loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. Fixed interest rates range from 3.45%-9.49% (3.45% - 9.49% APR) based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. Lowest rates shown are for eligible, creditworthy applicants with a graduate level degree, require a 5-year repayment term and include our Loyalty discount and Automatic Payment discounts of 0.25 percentage points each, as outlined in the Loyalty and Automatic Payment Discount disclosures. The maximum variable rate on the Education Refinance Loan is the greater of 21.00% or Prime Rate plus 9.00%. Subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change. Please note: Due to federal regulations, Citizens One is required to provide every potential borrower with disclosure information before they apply for a private student loan. The borrower will be presented with an Application Disclosure and an Approval Disclosure within the application process before they accept the terms and conditions of their loan.
Whether the terms of your student loans aren’t working for you or you want to look into securing a lower interest rate, refinancing could be just what you need. It doesn’t take much time to check out top student loan lenders for your refinancing options. If you decide you want to apply, you could start saving money on your loans in less than a month.
Hi I was 2 months away from being out of default on my student loans when I decided to claim bankruptcy 5 years ago. (We had fraud on accounts we counldnt get past.) I kept the same payment thinking it would complete it and switch over. Well it didn’t. So they have kept my student loans in default the whole time for 5 years on my credit report although we made payments, it all went to interest and fees. The fees in 5 years, and I have made payments every month, are $17,000! So now I owe $72K. When I graduated in 2000 I owed $38K. I guess what I want to know is can a company charge these fees in a federal student loan legally, because that doesn’t seem right when payments were being made. Because even in 25 years and I can write it off it’s more of a tax liability for me.
I am happy that I found your site and thank you for all of the information that you have provided. So, I went to Heald College in Stockton, CA, and graduated with my Associates Degree in Accounting, well at least I thought I did. I walked the stage and never received my diploma in the mail when they said they were. I requested it many time and never got anywhere. I started working at restaurants because I could not find work in Stockton, CA, and Heald College was not a big help when they said they would have job placements. I then moved to Maryland on the East Coast and went back to school. While I was going to school I landed a job at a Law Office as a paralegal. My boss closed down her law practice and I went to apply for schools in the area. The school that I applied to asked me for a copy of my transcript from Heald College. I requested it from a third party because as you already know it closed down. When I received my transcript in the mail, I discovered that I only had 8 credits. I called the third party and said that this is a mistake and that I graduated in 2008. She checked and said no, that is the correct transcript. I then applied for one of the programs to get it discharged and it was denied. I’ve tried calling the lawyers in California that worked on the case and never received a response back. If I go back to school I have to start all over again and still have this debt as well as the new student loans that I would have to take out. I hope you will have some pointers for me!
Yes i graduated college in 2010 and joined the navy in Fall of 2012 while I was at MEPS i was not aware of the Program the navy offered for Student Loan Forgiveness.. Now I am currently still in , and I have been doing some research about the Navy program for Student Loan Forgiveness and it is only offered for people who are about to join the navy. I am wondering are there any programs for Active Military Personnel like my self can qualify for???

To ask questions after you have submitted your Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Application and Promissory Note, contact the servicer for your new Direct Consolidation Loan. If you submitted your application online, your consolidation servicer’s contact information was provided at the end of the online process. If you submitted a paper application by U.S. mail, your consolidation servicer’s contact information was available when you downloaded or printed the paper application.


4This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a refi borrower with a Full Principal & Interest Repayment and a 10-year repayment term, has a $40,000 loan and a 5.5% Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $434.11 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $52,092.61. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary.


Also, I am currently back in school and now have federal loans that are deferred while I’m enrolled, but I want to understand what the best thing to do is once I graduate and have to start paying those back as well. I have felt a little lost in this process and don’t know where to turn/who to ask for advice, especially with the private loans and the balance that won’t go down. I appreciate any advice.
The quoted Annual Percentage Rate (APR) with discount includes a customer interest rate discount of 0.25% for having a prior student loan with Wells Fargo or a qualified Wells Fargo consumer checking account and requires a 5-year term. APRs may vary based on terms selected. Repayment term options may include 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 years based on credit qualifications. (A 20-year repayment term is available when the consolidation loan amount is $50,000 or more). Variable interest rates are based on an Index, plus a margin. The Index is equal to the Prime rate published in the Wall Street Journal. The APR for a variable rate loan may increase during the life of the loan if the index increases. This may result in higher monthly payments. Rates are current as of 10/01/2019 and subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo reserves the right to change rates, terms, and fees at any time. Your actual APR will depend upon your credit transaction, credit history, and loan term selected and will be determined when a credit decision is made. For questions, please contact us at 1-877-315-7723.
However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account.
Student loan forgiveness for nurses. Nurses shouldering student debt have several options for student loan forgiveness: Public Service Loan Forgiveness, Perkins loan cancellation, and the NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program, which pays up to 85% of qualified nurses’ unpaid college debt. Public Service Loan Forgiveness may be the most likely option for most nurses — few borrowers have Perkins loans, and the NURSE Corps program is highly competitive.
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