I have a question I have a parent plus student loan that I never applied for, the loan paper they mailed to me has what looks like my signature. But I never signed that paper there are three different types of hand writing on it, any way my son was paying it until there was a class action law suit for his loan that was ac heaved the same way mine loan was I have been telling them for years not my email that you are sending the bills to I everyone once in a while would get a letter via snail mail. it has been about 10 years and I have never made a single payment and I have been sent to Pioneer collection. what can I do.
The Teacher Loan Forgiveness program (TLF) is a form of student loan forgiveness that is separate from the Direct Loan or Obama Student Loan Forgiveness program. This program awards educators with a principal reduction of their federal loans. It was designed to encourage students to enter the education field and to incentivize teachers to continue teaching.
First let me say thank you for this article and all the helpful advice. Originally I owed a little over 40k when I graduated back in 1998. I got some deferments and then I went into default. Govt takes my tax return and applies it to my loan repayment. Twice I tried to make arrangements to pay…first time I was told to “wait it out until I get a good offer to pay pennies on the dollar” the second time I was told that I needed to make a payment that I just couldn’t afford… I offered $100 a month until i had better cashflow and the guy laughed at me and told me that would be worthless.
Great information, but I have a question. I had to consolidate my loans since they were not with a federal loan servicer. I am starting to repay my loans, ($200K). I have been working the last 17 years for local governments in my area. Is it true I have to be making payments at the same time I am working for the loan governments or it does not count for loan forgiveness under Public Service Forgiveness program? I am nearing retirement and this could be a problem.

Also, I am currently back in school and now have federal loans that are deferred while I’m enrolled, but I want to understand what the best thing to do is once I graduate and have to start paying those back as well. I have felt a little lost in this process and don’t know where to turn/who to ask for advice, especially with the private loans and the balance that won’t go down. I appreciate any advice.
This student loan forgiveness program cancels a percentage of a borrower’s Federal Perkins Loan if they work full-time in an eligible field. You will have a portion of your loans forgiven for each year of service. The specific cancellation terms depend on your line of work, but this program awards up to 100% forgiveness. For the majority of Perkins Loan cancellations, the cancellation terms are as follows:
After reading all the comments above I am extremely worried for my daughter who will be going off to college next year. The school she will be attending is a private Christian college, after scholarships she will have some debts. What types of loans should she get? There are so many I’m totally confused. I would like to help her make the right decisions from the beginning so she doesn’t go through what others are suffering.
Refinancing has some big potential benefits, including the possibility of lowering your interest rate to save you money on accruing interest. Alternatively, it might reduce your payments to a more affordable level, if you’re willing to shell out more interest over time. A student loan refinancing calculator can calculate your potential savings (or cost).
I took out Federal Student Loans in 1986 totaling about $25,000. Repayment began in 1992. I consolidated Perkins and Stafford loans in 1995. I have made 188 payments totaling $55,800 of which only $12,800 has gone to principal the remaining has gone to interest. I feel this is ridiculously upside down for a federal student loan. My current balance is $38000. Is there anything I can do to have all or part of this forgiven? I also very small loan from 2011 at a lower interest rate. Would consolidating make any difference?
If Lender agrees (in its sole discretion) to postpone or reduce any monthly payment(s) for a period of time, interest on the loan will continue to accrue for each day principal is owed. Although the borrower might not be required to make payments during such a period, the borrower may continue to make payments during such a period. Making payments, or paying some of the interest, will reduce the total amount that will be required to be paid over the life of the loan. Interest not paid during any period when Lender has agreed to postpone or reduce any monthly payment will be added to the principal balance through capitalization (compounding) at the end of such a period, one month before the borrower is required to resume making regular monthly payments.
Co-signer Release: Borrowers may apply for co-signer release after making 36 consecutive on-time payments of principal and interest. For the purpose of the application for co-signer release, on-time payments are defined as payments received within 15 days of the due date. Interest only payments do not qualify. The borrower must meet certain credit and eligibility guidelines when applying for the co-signer release. Borrowers must complete an application for release and provide income verification documents as part of the review. Borrowers who use deferment or forbearance will need to make 36 consecutive on-time payments after reentering repayment to qualify for release. The borrower applying for co-signer release must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. If an application for co-signer release is denied, the borrower may not reapply for co-signer release until at least one year from the date the application for co-signer release was received. Terms and conditions apply. Borrowers whose loans were funded prior to reaching the age of majority may not be eligible for co-signer release. Note: co-signer release is not available on the Student Loan for Parents or Education Refinance Loan for Parents.
You’ll have to evaluate your situation to decide whether refinancing federal student loans is a wise decision. For example, if you work in the public sector and could qualify for loan forgiveness in the future, you’d typically be better off keeping your federal loans. On the other hand, if you don’t work in the public sector and you’ve had no problems making your loan payments to date, then you may want to go ahead and refinance to save money on interest.
I owe $62,000 in student loans that I consolidated with Fed Loan Servicing. I am currently paying them back and figure I will be paying on them forever. Some of this amount is due to a couple small forbearances. Over half of the amount that I owe is interest. That is the part that hurts. The amount of interest owed. I gladly will pay back the principal amount owed, but the interest is ridiculous and right now my entire payment goes to interest only. Is there any plan that forgives some of the interest owed? Or that would offer a better interest rate? My current rate is 7.25%. Thank you
I currently have done 1 year in the Army Reserve after doing 5 years in the Air National Guard. I haven’t received a bonus from the Army because I was not eligible for any. Is there a program like the PSLF for people in the Guard/Reserve since we’re technically federal/DoD employees?? I was in school to be a pilot which ran me up to about $90,000 total…I enlisted to the Air National Guard where they did blood work to find out I have a Sickle Cell Trait and cannot fly unpressurized aircraft(hence cannot go through flight training). I pretty much wasted my time with school. I cannot file bankruptcy either or I’ll be discharged from the Army Reserve. Please Help!!!!
However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account.
Perkins Loan Discharges & Loan Cancellation for Nurses – Many people don’t realize it, but the “Teacher Loan Cancellation Program” also applies to Nurses, and allows full-time nurses (and medical technicians!) to write off 100% of their Perkins loans for five years of qualifying employment as a full-time nurse. The limitation on this program is that only Perkins loans are available for it, so you’d have to plan to use this one in advance of taking on debt.
I was called this morning from a loan company that calls me everyday but today I decided to answer. They told me they were from Allied Navient and wanted to take my loans from 35,428.06 to 2394.08. Is this a scam? The first person that I talked to when I answered seemed like he was paid to just break through the wall that I put up! The second person had my info and when I seemed interested in her offer she got me to a manager! He got on the phone and immediately took the offer to 1597.00 to put me in good standing? I have resources (friend) available to help but I don’t want to put him in that situation! He also wouldn’t give me the money until I researched to find out if I was getting scammed as he had never heard of that kind of offer!
We may agree under certain circumstances to allow postponement (deferral) of monthly payments of principal and interest for a period of time immediately following loan disbursement (not to exceed 6 months after the borrower’s graduation with an eligible degree), if the borrower is an eligible student in the borrower’s final term at the time of loan disbursement or graduated less than 6 months before loan disbursement, and has accepted an offer of (or has already begun) full-time employment.
I have a hard time finding any jobs I qualify for in some of the very rural areas the Army sends my husband. I have been told I’m over qualified since I have my master’s degree to work at a college. I was also in a car wreck in 2003 and now have a lot of issues with my knee (have had surgery) and neck (need surgery). My brother who is an RN said I definitely need to qualify for disability… But I’ve been fighting it, not sure I’m ready to do that. But there are times when I can’t use my left arm and have been in physical therapy so many times now for my neck and knee. My husband (been married 11 years) has no plans of helping me pay on my student loans at all. And some employers don’t want to hire a military spouse knowing we’ll have to move within 2 years. This student loan debt is ALWAYS on my mind and I get very depressed over it (I graduated in 1995 and did pay on them before I started moving around with my husband.) I just don’t even know what to do…
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Yes. You can choose to consolidate while you are still in school, during your grace period or after your grace period expires. If you choose to consolidate while you are still in school or during your grace period, you will lose any remaining grace period on the loans that you are consolidating, and you will begin making payments approximately 30-45 days after your loan is disbursed.
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I just wanted to comment on how dedicated you are to helping people Robert. You have provided prompt clear responses, with impressive information to every single person who commented on your article. I will share this with friends. I was fortunate to be in healthcare/non-profit & have a Perkins loan that was forgiven after 5 years. Thank you for your dedication to your field & being such an amazing person to give your time to answer all these questions. Kudos to you!
It depends on where you work today and what type of loans you have. It’s not about your school or what you did or didn’t do. Do you work in public service? Do you have Federal loans? If so, you’ll likely qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. If you have Federal loans, you’ll likely qualify for one of the repayment plans above that includes forgiveness.

For eligible Associates degrees in the healthcare field (see Eligibility & Eligible Loans section below), Lender will refinance up to $50,000 in loans for non-ParentPlus refinance loans.  Note, parents who are refinancing loans taken out on behalf of a child who has obtained an associates degrees in an eligible healthcare field are not subject to the $50,000 loan maximum, refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for more information about refinancing ParentPlus loans.

Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.50% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.45% to 4.25% for the 5-year term loan, 1.95% to 4.30% for the 7-year term loan, 2.20% to 4.35% for the 10-year term loan, 2.45% to 4.60% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.70% to 4.85% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.50% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $177.47 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93.
For details on how this program works, you definitely need to visit my page on the Borrower’s Defense Against Repayment Program, but because the system is so complicated, and can take so long to get an approval or denial response, this is one situation where I recommend that EVERYONE hires a student loan expert for assistance in preparing the application.

CommonBond: Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.19% effective August 10, 2019.

My 120 qualifying payments could take me 20+ years to eventually make if I let it. With the NHSC program, the requirements are much more specific, rural area, two year commitment, etc. I am interested in potentially applying for the NHSC program as well. I know that the two programs work differently and I am wondering if you know whether or not they could be used simultaneously? Are you aware of whether or not this has this been done before?

I took out Federal Student Loans in 1986 totaling about $25,000. Repayment began in 1992. I consolidated Perkins and Stafford loans in 1995. I have made 188 payments totaling $55,800 of which only $12,800 has gone to principal the remaining has gone to interest. I feel this is ridiculously upside down for a federal student loan. My current balance is $38000. Is there anything I can do to have all or part of this forgiven? I also very small loan from 2011 at a lower interest rate. Would consolidating make any difference?
I was on PAYE program for couple of years after grace period ended. Each year I submitted copies of my paystubs. This year, however, instead of paystubs I was only allowed to submit tax returns. Since we filed jointly with my domestic partner (not married, live and have a child together), my “income” has drastically increased. Hence, I was not qualified for PAYE. Although, we live together and file taxes jointly, I think it’s wrong to dismiss my actual income. I work part-time and dont make too much at all, so I’m barely able to meet the standard monthly payments. Is there any way around submitting your taxes to qualify for PAYE?

Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.05% effective September 10, 2019.
I believe this is misleading, You mentioned having $50k forgiven at the end of an income-based repayment term, that the tax owed is cheaper than the loan + interest. But the $50K you would owe at that point *is* the remaining loan + interest. If your IBR amount was covering the interest and some of the principle you’d likely have paid a ton more interest than you would have if you stayed on a 10-year term, but if your payments did not cover the interest, then your loan balance would have been increasing over time. That $50k could have represented a $12k original loan… If you qualified to pay nothing — then with a 6.5% interest loan over 25 years you’d end-up paying tax on 5x the original balance… You’d likely be pushed into a much higher tax bracket. I believe this is a dangerous recommendation for you to make. If the tax law change, then great, but there’s no guarantee of that. Can you explain your logic in the light that unpaid interest in accruing in your loan balance?
Like other forms of debt, you can refinance a student loan (both private student loans and federal student loans are eligible for refinancing). With most lenders, you start with a rate estimate, which doesn’t require a hard credit inquiry. When comparing rates from different lenders, be sure to pay attention to additional key differences, such as fees, before making a final decision (Earnest has no fees, for what it’s worth). The next step is to submit an application, and provide any additional required verification, such as IDs or pay stubs. Once you’re approved, you sign a few documents and indicate the loans you’d like to refinance. Your new lender will pay off these old loans, and voila, you have a shiny new refinanced student loan.
Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $137.84 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $103.88 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $78.30 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $67.66 to $79.16.
I have a question I have a parent plus student loan that I never applied for, the loan paper they mailed to me has what looks like my signature. But I never signed that paper there are three different types of hand writing on it, any way my son was paying it until there was a class action law suit for his loan that was ac heaved the same way mine loan was I have been telling them for years not my email that you are sending the bills to I everyone once in a while would get a letter via snail mail. it has been about 10 years and I have never made a single payment and I have been sent to Pioneer collection. what can I do.

Splash Financial: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.50% APR to 7.03% APR and Variable Rates range from 2.43% APR to 7.76% APR. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. Fixed rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 6.49% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.59% to 6.54% for a 8-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.79% per year to 6.59% per year for a 12-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). Variable rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 3.69% per year to 5.72% per year for a 8-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.47% per year to 6.36% per year for a 12-year term, 4.50% per year to 7.76% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. Variable interest rates will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. The maximum variable rate on the student refinance loan is 9.00% for 5-year, 7-year, 8-year and 10-year terms, and 10.00% for 12-year, 15-year and 20-year terms. The floor rate is 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.
Hello Robert, I recently read your post about FedLoan servicing which is my student loan servicer. I am a recent grad and my loans have just exited their grace period. I have been in the process for about 2 months now to try and switch to a pay as you earn or an income based plan. My application is in, but have not heard about processing. Any advice on how to achieve and get news about this with FedLoan servicing?
The money I was making wasn’t very much and I put the student loans under an IBR with a payment of $0 per month. My original loans were all subsidized but because I consolidated them around 1993 (there was some law that came into effect right afterward to protect borrowers who had subsidized loans) they still accrue interest. My current balance is over $53,000.

I have been working for a non profit public university for the past 4 years and loyally paying on my loans…under a graduated repayment plan 🙁 I thought my payments qualified! Nobody ever told me a graduated repayment plan would disqualify me from loan forgiveness! I feel like I’ve lost 4 years that I desperately needed toward paying these off. What do I do??? Is there any way to make those 4 years count? The plans that do qualify were only $30 a month more than what I’ve been paying, it seems so silly…and now I’m so discouraged…
For example, if you have both Direct Loans and other types of federal student loans, and you have been making payments toward PSLF on your Direct Loans, you should not consolidate your Direct Loans along with your other loans. Similarly, if you have Federal Perkins Loans and you are employed in an occupation that would qualify you for Perkins Loan cancellation benefits, you should not include your Perkins Loans when you consolidate. Leaving out your Direct Loans or Perkins Loans will preserve the benefits on those loans.
We may agree under certain circumstances to allow a borrower to make $100/month payments for a period of time immediately after loan disbursement if the borrower is employed full-time as an intern, resident, or similar postgraduate trainee at the time of loan disbursement. These payments may not be enough to cover all of the interest that accrues on the loan. Unpaid accrued interest will be added to your loan and monthly payments of principal and interest will begin when the post-graduate training program ends.
my loans are 72k and 3.5%. I am currently enrolled for the last two years under public service loan forgiveness. I do not qualify for IBR and am in the process of applying for PAYE. I have been paying my loans since 2007 but only under the PSLF since 2014. My question is..Is it worth it to stay under PSLF for another 8 years or switch back to a graduated payment plan for another 10 years that will give me lower payments. Which plan will result in the most loan forgiveness.

Robert I really appreciate what you are doing here. This student loan thing is so complicated. I am the parent of a grad-student who graduated in May with a degree in film (screenwriting) we co-signed on his private loans ($130k) and he still doesn’t have permanent/full time work. We have spoken to the loan provider and they want us to repay the loans since our son can’t yet. I don’t know how many of these options are available for private loans. Right now they want $1100 per month, which we can’t pay and neither can our son. We should never have co-signed because now its going to affect our credit and his. What are out options? Thanks
Hoping you can provide some assistance as I get extremely confused with all the different options. Currently have 2 Consolidated Loans thru Navient equaling ~11K. They were consolidated in 12/2002. Was paying on previously but that is last time consolidated. Paying since 1997. I know I have definitely paid the loan probably twice now and just can’t get ahead as a single mom.

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Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.54% to 4.16% for the 5-year term loan, 1.86% to 4.21% for the 7-year term loan, 2.11% to 4.26% for the 10-year term loan, 2.36% to 4.51% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.61% to 4.76% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $178.27 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93.
Thank you. The article you referenced states that the AGI is minus personal exemptions and itemized deductions…which is wrong. “Adjusted Gross Income is calculated before the itemized or standard deductions” from a tax website. I WISH it was after exemptions and itemized deductions as that is a huge, huge difference in the AGI…but it’s not. My payment is supposed to be $400 based on my husbands income alone and their is no way we can do that now…none. If find SOME job to make that $400, the payment will just go UP…which is crazy. It’s like you cannot win. It seems to make no sense for me to work at all….which is wrong. Filing separately seems to be a choice, but we have a daughter in college and would lose the education deductions, etc. This whole thing is crazy if it makes more financial sense for me to not work at all! Or I guess he could file injured spouse year after year, but I just don’t understand why they won’t just consider MY income. Sorry for venting, just frustrated.
Good Morning Robert, I did an (Obama) forgivness loan agreement with NationalStudentCenter.com 1(866)359-3821. Currently unemployed and said I qualified for my loans to be consolidated and reduced all the way to $0 for the next 20-30 month with the first 3months being $197.33. Paid thru my checking and already one month in. The wierd thing is I had to Esign the App so they can move forward with the process. I received an email from NelNet saying that they received my App. But I never Esigned the App because I started to become skeptical about the loan. With the info that I just provided you, can your expertise tell me if this is a scam? If so how do I get out of it.

Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan and Education Refinance Loan for Parents Eligibility: For the Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan and Education Refinance Loan for Parents, primary borrowers must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or resident alien with a valid U.S. Social Security Number residing in the United States. Resident aliens must apply with a co-signer who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The co-signer (if applicable) must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident with a valid U.S. Social Security Number residing in the United States. For applicants who have not reached the age of majority in their state of residence, a co-signer will be required and may not be eligible for co-signer release. For the Citizens Bank Education Refinance Loan, applicants may not be currently enrolled in school and applicants with an Associate’s degree, or with no degree, must have made at least 12 qualifying payments after leaving school. Qualifying payments are the most recent on time and consecutive payments of principal and interest on the loans being refinanced.  Citizens Bank observes the right to modify or discontinue these benefits at any time. Both Education Refinance Loans and Education Refinance Loan for Parents are subject to credit qualification, completion of a loan application/consumer credit agreement, verification of application information, certification of borrower’s student loan amount(s) and highest degree earned or affordability, as applicable. The minimum student loan refinance amount is $10,000. Some federal student loans include unique benefits that the borrower may not receive with a private student loan, some of which we do not offer with the Education Refinance Loan. Borrowers should carefully review their current benefits, especially if they work in public service, are in the military, are currently on or considering income based repayment options or are concerned about a steady source of future income. For more information about federal student loan benefits and federal loan consolidation, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/. Resources are available to help the borrower make a decision, including a comparison of federal and private student loan benefits, at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/types/loans/federal-vs-private.

For example, if you have both Direct Loans and other types of federal student loans, and you have been making payments toward PSLF on your Direct Loans, you should not consolidate your Direct Loans along with your other loans. Similarly, if you have Federal Perkins Loans and you are employed in an occupation that would qualify you for Perkins Loan cancellation benefits, you should not include your Perkins Loans when you consolidate. Leaving out your Direct Loans or Perkins Loans will preserve the benefits on those loans.


FFEL Consolidation Loan to use the no accrual of interest benefit for active duty service members, which states that you’re not required to pay the interest that accrues during periods of qualifying active duty military service (for up to 60 months) on the portion of a Direct Consolidation Loan that repaid a Direct Loan Program or FFEL Program loan first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008.
Private student loan lenders want to ensure that you have sufficient income to repay your student loans. Lenders want proof that you have stable and recurring monthly income and cash flow. Examine your pay stubs and identify your after-tax monthly income. When you subtract your proposed monthly student loan payments, does a sufficient amount remain for other essential living expenses?
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I am a mother of a child with a permanent disability. Do to my child needing my full care and attention, I could not finish school. I’m over $11,000 in debt with Mohela in student loans. Can my loans be forgiven, or discharged? I have been in a repayment plan that requires me to pay $0. Every year I have to renew it. I know I will not be able to make any payments anytime soon as I still care for my little one.
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