Finally, where is all the money going? I get that your payments are a lot of money each month, but your husband makes a really good income, and you didn’t say, but with that much debt I would guess you have your masters and earn at least $50k per year. That’s $185,000 per year – after taxes you should still be bringing in $11,500. After his child support you should still be at $10,000 or so per month. A big house, food for all the kids, clothes, etc, maybe costs you $6,000 per month (and that’s being very generous). Where’s the other $4,000 going? Something is not adding up here.
I currently have done 1 year in the Army Reserve after doing 5 years in the Air National Guard. I haven’t received a bonus from the Army because I was not eligible for any. Is there a program like the PSLF for people in the Guard/Reserve since we’re technically federal/DoD employees?? I was in school to be a pilot which ran me up to about $90,000 total…I enlisted to the Air National Guard where they did blood work to find out I have a Sickle Cell Trait and cannot fly unpressurized aircraft(hence cannot go through flight training). I pretty much wasted my time with school. I cannot file bankruptcy either or I’ll be discharged from the Army Reserve. Please Help!!!!
Moving your loans to a private lender or grouping your government debt with a new federal loan servicer could be the turning point of your repayment. If you’re unsure which route to take, consider scenarios when refinancing makes sense or whether consolidation would be wise in your case. In the end, the best decision is the one that’s best for you.
You’ll have to evaluate your situation to decide whether refinancing federal student loans is a wise decision. For example, if you work in the public sector and could qualify for loan forgiveness in the future, you’d typically be better off keeping your federal loans. On the other hand, if you don’t work in the public sector and you’ve had no problems making your loan payments to date, then you may want to go ahead and refinance to save money on interest.
Refinancing federal student loans means you turn them private. As a result, you lose access to federal programs, such as income-driven repayment and Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Some private lenders offer help if you run into financial hardship, but this varies by lender. If you’re relying on federal protections, then you should not refinance your federal student loans. But if you’re comfortable sacrificing these programs, refinancing could be a smart strategy for paying off your loans.
I have a question about Public Service Loan Forgiveness. I started with 160k in student loans in 2012. After graduation, I enrolled in a standard 25 year repayment plan but paid extra each month to get to an amount that I thought would repay the loan 10 years. From 2013 until January of 2016 I paid $1,750 per month. The entire time I was working in the Public Service field. Finally, in 2016, I gave up on leaving the public sector and decided to enroll in the PSLF plan and stick it out in the public sector for the remaining 7 years to get the loan paid off. However, for the previous payments to qualify they would have had to have been $1,766. Because my calculations were off, my payments were $16 short each month; and I didn’t get credit for the 3 years of payments. Is there any way to appeal this decision?
In the early 1990’s I was an “adult learner” (25 yrs old), a single parent, living on my own, having zero child support and receiving some forms of welfare assistance while I was employed and attended school full-time. I did not qualify for scholarships and had to take out school loans to supplement my schooling cost and used the loan “refund” to pay my living bills (utilities) for 6-8 months ahead in the event I couldn’t or didn’t have the money to make my bills at that given time. I attended an accredited school 4 years, graduated with 2 associate degrees and began working almost immediately. However, due to HMO’s and my chosen field’s national organization, Occupational Therapy, not really pushing the benefits of OT/COTA nor explaining to the public what it was exactly, the facility where I was employed fazed all COTA’s out. After a short period of time I went back to school, a trade school (Cosmetology), had to apply for loans again and again, did not qualify for scholarships.

It's that simple.  What's even better is that your income could be low enough to qualify for zero or minimal repayment, at which your loan will be forgiven at the end. Yes, there may be tax consequences, but that shouldn't deter you from these programs. It is the best alternative if you can't afford your loans and you are looking for forgiveness options (and we discuss the taxes a bit at the end of the article).


Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.05% effective September 10, 2019.
Terms and Conditions apply. Splash reserves the right to modify or discontinue products and benefits at any time without notice. Rates and terms are also subject to change at any time without notice. Offers are subject to credit approval. To qualify, a borrower must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident in an eligible state and meet applicable underwriting requirements. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. Lowest rates are reserved for the highest qualified borrowers.
To ask questions after you have submitted your Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Application and Promissory Note, contact the servicer for your new Direct Consolidation Loan. If you submitted your application online, your consolidation servicer’s contact information was provided at the end of the online process. If you submitted a paper application by U.S. mail, your consolidation servicer’s contact information was available when you downloaded or printed the paper application.
I have been very impressed with my application process with LendKey! Their customer service team is prompt in responding to any inquiries via email and very helpful on the phone! The application process was easy to follow and very user friendly! With LendKey's help, I'll be saving nearly $400 per month on my student loans! I'm absolutely thrilled and feel like I can breathe again knowing how much this is going to help me financially and the ability to pay my loans off faster. Thank you LendKey!
My wife has two Navient loans. She was making regular payments but her principal kept growing. They would be months when none of her money was applied to principal even though she paid every thirty days. Then she would get a whopping accrued interest bill. We went to several agencies including CFPF protesting. They would ask Navient for a reply and accept anything Navient said and close the case.
In 1994, I started at ITT. I applied for CAD, I thought I was going to take classes for CAD. Then I was told I tested higher in Electronics and I wld make more money in that field. I was 22 at the time, just married and had a child. So, I went with it. I was lied to from the beginning. I was only in the school 3 months at best. I have had hardship most of my adult life. Stuggling to make ends meet. I originally had my loan through William D Ford Direct Loans. I belive my loan was only 2k to start. Now its at 18k. I kept putting on a deferment. I explained about my hardship. This is what was recommended. Now my loan is at Navient..They want me to pay on this for 25 yrs and then they will give me a loan forgiveness. I’ll probably be be dead by then. Is their any way I can get a forgiveness on this loan now?
Along with your credit score and annual income, some lenders also look at your savings and debt-to-income ratio. Finally, some lenders require proof of graduation, as they’ll only approve borrowers who have obtained their degree. If you left school before graduating, there are relatively few student loan refinance providers that will work with you.
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I have loans before 2007. My lender advised that I go through REPAYE. Because I’m getting married in 2016, I’d rather go under PAYE (in order to file married but seperate). If I consolidate my loans (which I’ve also been advised to do perhaps because some are Stafford and REPAYE doesn’t cover those???), would I then qualify for PAYE? What other benefits/consquences are there to consolidating loans?
I have two graduate school loans from 2010 to 2013 – Stafford Loan and Grad Plus loan. I am currently enrolled in the pay as you earn program but am confused on the “loan forgiveness” opportunities. If I am not working in a public sector; can I still qualify for the 10 year forgiveness or does that automatically place me in the 25 year category? Also, am I responsible for taxes on the amount that is forgiven after 10 or 25 (whichever is applicable to my situation)?
For Associates Degrees: Only associates degrees earned in one of the following are eligible for refinancing: Cardiovascular Technologist (CVT); Dental Hygiene; Diagnostic Medical Sonography; EMT/Paramedics; Nuclear Technician; Nursing; Occupational Therapy Assistant; Pharmacy Technician; Physical Therapy Assistant; Radiation Therapy; Radiologic/MRI Technologist; Respiratory Therapy; or Surgical Technologist. To refinance an Associates degree, a borrower must also either be currently enrolled and in the final term of an associate degree program at a Title IV eligible school with an offer of employment in the same field in which they will receive an eligible associate degree OR have graduated from a school that is Title IV eligible with an eligible associate and have been employed, for a minimum of 12 months, in the same field of study of the associate degree earned.
1Laurel Road: Laurel Road Bank is a Connecticut banking corporation offering products in all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. Laurel Road has helped thousands of professionals with graduate and undergraduate degrees across the country to refinance and consolidate over $3 billion in federal and private school loans, saving these borrowers thousands of dollars each. Lending services provided by Laurel Road Bank, Member FDIC. APR stands for “Annual Percentage Rate.” Rates listed include a 0.25% EFT discount, for automatic payments made from a checking or savings account. Interest rates as of 4/05/2019. Rates subject to change. Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.50% per year to 5.55% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.00% per year for a 7-year term, 4.30% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.60% per year to 6.80% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.05% per year to 7.02% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $137.84 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $103.88 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $78.30 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $67.66 to $79.16. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.25% per year to 6.05% per year for a 5-year term, 3.75% per year to 6.10% per year for a 7-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.15% per year for a 10-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.25% to 3.80% for the 5-year term loan, 1.50% to 3.85% for the 7-year term loan, 1.75% to 3.90% for the 10-year term loan, 2.00% to 4.15% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.25% to 4.40% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.75% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $178.58 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. 
I was a teacher for almost 15 years at three different Title I schools which qualified me for the “service related” but I never took advantage of it because I was making good money. I decided to change jobs and to work for New York State in a juvenile detention center as a teacher, and I lost that job. I have been two years with out a job and no unemployment for the past year, so this doesn’t qualify me for the “service related” forgiveness plan. What should I do?
After loan disbursement, if a borrower documents a qualifying economic hardship, we may agree in our discretion to allow for full or partial forbearance of payments for one or more 3-month time periods (not to exceed 12 months in the aggregate during the term of your loan), provided that we receive acceptable documentation (including updating documentation) of the nature and expected duration of the borrower’s economic hardship.
You can start by looking at our list of the best student loan refinancing lenders, and then picking out the ones that seem like good fits. All these lenders let you check what kind of loan terms you could get through them online in a matter of minutes. You just plug in some of your information, the lender does a soft credit check (which has no impact on your credit score), and then they’ll show you potential loan options.
Graduates may refinance any unsubsidized or subsidized Federal or private student loan that was used exclusively for qualified higher education expenses (as defined in 26 USC Section 221) at an accredited U.S. undergraduate or graduate school. Any federal loans refinanced with Lender are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment.
Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. ‍ All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.19% effective August 10, 2019.
All loans must be in grace or repayment status and cannot be in default. Borrower must have graduated or be enrolled in good standing in the final term preceding graduation from an accredited Title IV U.S. school and must be employed, or have an eligible offer of employment. Parents looking to refinance loans taken out on behalf of a child should refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for applicable terms and conditions.
Next, you can choose what type of interest rate you want when you refinance. Variable-rate student loans can cost you less to start, but there’s the possibility that the interest rate goes up later. As a general rule, a variable-rate loan works well when you only need a couple years to pay off the balance, but you may also want to read more about choosing between fixed and variable student loan refinancing.
I have about 200,000 in student loans. I am just starting to pay them off. I work for an Intermediate unit, so I was told I would qualify for PSLF after ten years of making payments on time. I was also told I can consolidate to decrease payment amounts. I am not sure which plan to choose to remain in the PSLF program. Do I have to do IBR? Or can I select Graduated which gives me a lower payment? I would love to have the smaller monthly payment and extended loan amount. Any suggestions?

I’ve been making about $200 payments on my combined 2 private loans and $0 payments on my Direct/Stafford loans under the Income Driven Repayment plan for about 5 years now. Every year I have to send my information to renew the plan before I’m charged $500+ a month. So I’m a bit confused about how after the payment plan ends the loan will be forgiven. Am I missing some fine print somewhere?
1Laurel Road: Laurel Road Bank is a Connecticut banking corporation offering products in all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. Laurel Road has helped thousands of professionals with graduate and undergraduate degrees across the country to refinance and consolidate over $3 billion in federal and private school loans, saving these borrowers thousands of dollars each. Lending services provided by Laurel Road Bank, Member FDIC. APR stands for “Annual Percentage Rate.” Rates listed include a 0.25% EFT discount, for automatic payments made from a checking or savings account. Interest rates as of 4/05/2019. Rates subject to change. Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.50% per year to 5.55% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.00% per year for a 7-year term, 4.30% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.60% per year to 6.80% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.05% per year to 7.02% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $137.84 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $103.88 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $78.30 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $67.66 to $79.16. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the fixed rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular fixed interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.25% per year to 6.05% per year for a 5-year term, 3.75% per year to 6.10% per year for a 7-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.15% per year for a 10-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.25% to 3.80% for the 5-year term loan, 1.50% to 3.85% for the 7-year term loan, 1.75% to 3.90% for the 10-year term loan, 2.00% to 4.15% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.25% to 4.40% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.75% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $178.58 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93. However, if the borrower chooses to make monthly payments automatically by electronic funds transfer (EFT) from a bank account, the variable rate will decrease by 0.25%, and will increase back up to the regular variable interest rate described in the preceding paragraph if the borrower stops making (or we stop accepting) monthly payments automatically by EFT from the designated borrower’s bank account. 
There is no application fee to consolidate your federal education loans into a Direct Consolidation Loan. You may be contacted by private companies that offer to help you apply for a Direct Consolidation Loan, for a fee. These companies have no affiliation with the U.S. Department of Education (ED) or ED’s consolidation loan servicers. There’s no need to pay anyone for assistance in getting a Direct Consolidation Loan. The application process is easy and free.
Great information, but I have a question. I had to consolidate my loans since they were not with a federal loan servicer. I am starting to repay my loans, ($200K). I have been working the last 17 years for local governments in my area. Is it true I have to be making payments at the same time I am working for the loan governments or it does not count for loan forgiveness under Public Service Forgiveness program? I am nearing retirement and this could be a problem.
Along with your credit score and annual income, some lenders also look at your savings and debt-to-income ratio. Finally, some lenders require proof of graduation, as they’ll only approve borrowers who have obtained their degree. If you left school before graduating, there are relatively few student loan refinance providers that will work with you.
Hello Robert, I recently read your post about FedLoan servicing which is my student loan servicer. I am a recent grad and my loans have just exited their grace period. I have been in the process for about 2 months now to try and switch to a pay as you earn or an income based plan. My application is in, but have not heard about processing. Any advice on how to achieve and get news about this with FedLoan servicing?
If Lender agrees (in its sole discretion) to postpone or reduce any monthly payment(s) for a period of time, interest on the loan will continue to accrue for each day principal is owed. Although the borrower might not be required to make payments during such a period, the borrower may continue to make payments during such a period. Making payments, or paying some of the interest, will reduce the total amount that will be required to be paid over the life of the loan. Interest not paid during any period when Lender has agreed to postpone or reduce any monthly payment will be added to the principal balance through capitalization (compounding) at the end of such a period, one month before the borrower is required to resume making regular monthly payments.
My wife has two Navient loans. She was making regular payments but her principal kept growing. They would be months when none of her money was applied to principal even though she paid every thirty days. Then she would get a whopping accrued interest bill. We went to several agencies including CFPF protesting. They would ask Navient for a reply and accept anything Navient said and close the case.
Total and permanent disability discharge. If you cannot work due to being totally and permanently disabled, physically or mentally, you may qualify to have your remaining student loan debt canceled. To be eligible, you’ll need to provide documentation proving your disability. Once your loans are discharged, the government may monitor your finances and disability for three years. If you don’t meet requirements during the monitoring period, your loans may be reinstated. Details on the application process are available at disabilitydischarge.com.
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