I have $17K of subsidized student loans left to pay after about 12 years of payments. I’ve been at my public service job for about 12 years also. I never enrolled in any forgiveness plan. Is there a way for me to get the $17K forgiven or do I need to enroll in a program now, then my payments start “counting” towards the 10 years (which wouldn’t make sense)?
I have student loans about 28000 and did finish my degree due to the depression and OCD which I had since I was born plus 3 years ago my dad become disable due to the stroke which currently disable and no job. I had to quite my collage and staying with him to help him daily. No degree and no job only had 4100 Last year. What should I do and how can I pay the loan. Is there any forgiven loan program. Any recommendation which can help me please
Yes i graduated college in 2010 and joined the navy in Fall of 2012 while I was at MEPS i was not aware of the Program the navy offered for Student Loan Forgiveness.. Now I am currently still in , and I have been doing some research about the Navy program for Student Loan Forgiveness and it is only offered for people who are about to join the navy. I am wondering are there any programs for Active Military Personnel like my self can qualify for???
I have loans before 2007. My lender advised that I go through REPAYE. Because I’m getting married in 2016, I’d rather go under PAYE (in order to file married but seperate). If I consolidate my loans (which I’ve also been advised to do perhaps because some are Stafford and REPAYE doesn’t cover those???), would I then qualify for PAYE? What other benefits/consquences are there to consolidating loans?
I have a hard time finding any jobs I qualify for in some of the very rural areas the Army sends my husband. I have been told I’m over qualified since I have my master’s degree to work at a college. I was also in a car wreck in 2003 and now have a lot of issues with my knee (have had surgery) and neck (need surgery). My brother who is an RN said I definitely need to qualify for disability… But I’ve been fighting it, not sure I’m ready to do that. But there are times when I can’t use my left arm and have been in physical therapy so many times now for my neck and knee. My husband (been married 11 years) has no plans of helping me pay on my student loans at all. And some employers don’t want to hire a military spouse knowing we’ll have to move within 2 years. This student loan debt is ALWAYS on my mind and I get very depressed over it (I graduated in 1995 and did pay on them before I started moving around with my husband.) I just don’t even know what to do…
Fixed rate options consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 3.75% per year to 5.80% per year for a 5-year term would be from $183.04 to $192.40. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term would be from $137.84 to $147.29. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term would be from $103.88 to $114.31. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term would be from $78.30 to $90.16. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term would be from $67.66 to $79.16.
I owed 160,000 on student’s loans; I qualified for the 10 years forgiveness plan. I have been paying since 2007. My income is not that high, so I have to get a second job in order to be able to make the payments for the student loans. Last year, I found out that none of the payments I made since 2009 qualified for the 10 years forgiveness program, because I was paying under the wrong plan and not the IBR plan, nobody told me that in order to qualified for the 10 year forgiveness program the condition was to be under the IBR payment. Although, the payments before were higher than what I’m paying now under the IBR plan.
4This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a refi borrower with a Full Principal & Interest Repayment and a 10-year repayment term, has a $40,000 loan and a 5.5% Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $434.11 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $52,092.61. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary.
It’s hard to say for sure what you should do in this situation, but don’t give up, because you do have options. The loan is never going to disappear entirely, and don’t think that “forgiveness” is free, because even when you have your debt “forgiven”, the IRS counts it as taxable income for that year, and you end up facing a pretty big tax bill anyway.
Education Refinance Loan Rate Disclosure: Variable rate, based on the one-month London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) published in The Wall Street Journal on the twenty-fifth day, or the next business day, of the preceding calendar month. As of October 1, 2019, the one-month LIBOR rate is 2.05%. Variable interest rates range from 2.25% – 9.24% (3.25% – 9.24% APR) and will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a cosigner. Fixed interest rates range from 3.45% – 9.49% (3.45% – 9.49% APR) based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a cosigner. Lowest rates shown are for eligible, creditworthy applicants with a graduate level degree, require a 5-year repayment term and include our Loyalty discount and Automatic Payment discounts of 0.25 percentage points each, as outlined in the Loyalty and Automatic Payment Discount disclosures. The maximum variable rate on the Education Refinance Loan is the greater of 21.00% or Prime Rate plus 9.00%. Subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change. Please note: Due to federal regulations, Citizens Bank is required to provide every potential borrower with disclosure information before they apply for a private student loan. The borrower will be presented with an Application Disclosure and an Approval Disclosure within the application process before they accept the terms and conditions of their loan. Loyalty Discount Disclosure: The borrower will be eligible for a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction on their loan if the borrower or their co-signer (if applicable) has a qualifying account in existence with us at the time the borrower and their co-signer (if applicable) have submitted a completed application authorizing us to review their credit request for the loan. The following are qualifying accounts: any checking account, savings account, money market account, certificate of deposit, automobile loan, home equity loan, home equity line of credit, mortgage, credit card account, or other student loans owned by Citizens Bank, N.A. Please note, our checking and savings account options are only available in the following states: CT, DE, MA, MI, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, and VT and some products may have an associated cost. This discount will be reflected in the interest rate disclosed in the Loan Approval Disclosure that will be provided to the borrower once the loan is approved. Limit of one Loyalty Discount per loan and discount will not be applied to prior loans. The Loyalty Discount will remain in effect for the life of the loan. Automatic Payment Discount Disclosure: Borrowers will be eligible to receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate reduction on their student loans owned by Citizens Bank, N.A. during such time as payments are required to be made and our loan servicer is authorized to automatically deduct payments each month from any bank account the borrower designates. Discount is not available when payments are not due, such as during forbearance. If our loan servicer is unable to successfully withdraw the automatic deductions from the designated account three or more times within any 12-month period, the borrower will no longer be eligible for this discount.
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You — or your co-signer— typically need credit scores that are at least in the high 600s. Many refinance lenders seek borrowers with scores in the mid-700s. The better your (or your co-signer’s) credit, the better the rate you’ll likely qualify for. Additionally, you need enough income to comfortably cover your expenses, student loan payments and and other debts.

If any of the loans you want to consolidate are still in the grace period, you have the option of indicating on your Direct Consolidation Loan application that you want the servicer that is processing your application to delay the consolidation of your loans until closer to the grace period end date. If you select this option, you won’t have to begin making payments on your new Direct Consolidation Loan until closer to the end of the grace period on your current loans.
In the early 1990’s I was an “adult learner” (25 yrs old), a single parent, living on my own, having zero child support and receiving some forms of welfare assistance while I was employed and attended school full-time. I did not qualify for scholarships and had to take out school loans to supplement my schooling cost and used the loan “refund” to pay my living bills (utilities) for 6-8 months ahead in the event I couldn’t or didn’t have the money to make my bills at that given time. I attended an accredited school 4 years, graduated with 2 associate degrees and began working almost immediately. However, due to HMO’s and my chosen field’s national organization, Occupational Therapy, not really pushing the benefits of OT/COTA nor explaining to the public what it was exactly, the facility where I was employed fazed all COTA’s out. After a short period of time I went back to school, a trade school (Cosmetology), had to apply for loans again and again, did not qualify for scholarships.
Note: Servicing for this program is managed by another federal student loan servicer. If you enroll in Public Service Loan Forgiveness, your eligible loans will be transferred from Great Lakes to that servicer. Also note, you may not receive a benefit for the same qualifying payments or period of service for Teacher Loan Forgiveness and Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

I finished grad school with about 50k in federal direct loans. I immediately went to work in a non profit and enrolled in IBR repayment plan. I paid on this for about 5 years which left me owing about 80k. At the time I was not concerned because I figured I would remain in the same field for at least 10 years and would be eligible for forgiveness. However, I got a new job in the private sector last year, nearly tripling y salary. I switched to standard repayment plan and have paid down my loan aggressively and am now back down to about 45k. My fixed interest rate is 6.5%. I plan to pay off the remainder in the next year (barring any catastrophic events). My question is — is my best bet to just continue (over) paying my loans on this current plan or do I have any other options? Am I able to pay them off with a private loan that has a lower interest rate? Thanks so much for your help!


I received my master’s degree in 1998 and have been paying towards my federal loans since (aside from a short period of forebearance). I entered the IBR plan about two years ago. In terms of the loan forgiveness component, do my seventeen years of payments prior to entering IBR count towards the 25-year forgiveness mark, or did that 25-year period only commence with my entrance in the IBR program itself (in which case I would conceivably be paying off my loan over 42 years)?
If you want to get approved for a Borrower’s Defense Discharge, then you should call the Student Loan Relief Helpline’s Borrower’s Defense Against Repayment Hotline and pay them to review your situation, help you put together the legal arguments required for your application, and increase the odds that you’ll actually receive an approval after it’s been submitted.
You’ll need to figure out if the loan is Private or Federal, and then determine if you have any sort of qualifying conditions, like working for the right kind of employer, in the Non-Profit space, Federal Government, as a Nurse, etc., to see if your wife matches any of the available Forgiveness programs currently on offer. It’s not a simple question!
Remember that when you’re refinancing, you can pick exactly which loans you want to refinance. You’re free to refinance only your private student loans and continue paying off the federal loans like normal. You may find that option gives you the best of both worlds, allowing you to save money on your private loans while retaining the perks of your federal loans.
“Obama Student Loan Forgiveness” is a nickname for the William D. Ford Direct Loan program. The name came about when President Obama reformed part of the Direct Loan program in 2010 by signing the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.  As a result of expanded funding for federal student loans, more borrowers gained access to more options with loan repayment.
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