I had to file to drop my classes because I was in bed rest for four months. I was told that since it was a medical emergency that I wouldn’t be expected to pay back any student aid that I received and I could continue once I was off bed rest. When I tried to go back I was told that I had to pay off my loan first. So I did. Then I was told that another loan had been taken out in my name. The address that they claimed the check was delivered to has never been my address, nor have I ever lived there. It was the address of an estranged sibling that I have had no contact with. I explained this, but I was told that I still have to pay the loan or my transcripts would be held hostage so that I could never go back to college anywhere. The advisor that they appointed me when I first enrolled had been fired, so I found a new one who worked for the state. He tried to help me sort things out. On one conference call they told him that a loan had been sent to the fore mentioned address, on another they claimed that I had outstanding fines from aid money that I needed to repay. We called the office that handles all student aid info and they said that I do not owe them money and if I did then it would be between me and the state, not the school. So we called them again and again they claimed that I had taken out a second loan. The new advisor said he’d never seen anything like it and he said that I still qualify for a full scholarship if I can get my transcripts released. I don’t have the money to pay the loan back twice. It took me years to pay it back the first time. Any ideas? I’ve tried just about everything, including reporting it on the FBI’s identity theft site.
I just wanted to comment on how dedicated you are to helping people Robert. You have provided prompt clear responses, with impressive information to every single person who commented on your article. I will share this with friends. I was fortunate to be in healthcare/non-profit & have a Perkins loan that was forgiven after 5 years. Thank you for your dedication to your field & being such an amazing person to give your time to answer all these questions. Kudos to you!
I have significant amount of loans. I applied for a repayment plan and was told I did not qualify for Paye because I had loans before 2007 so I was out on REPaye. My partner and I are now thinking of getting married (so I can get his medical insurance benefits) but I just read that under REPaye they always look at your joint income even if you’re married filing separate. Can I change my payment plan to IBR so only my AGI would be taken into consideration? I’ve only made 6 qualifying thus far. Also, would IBR increase or decrease my current payment? I’m hoping the repayment plans are not permanent. We are also speaking to our tax person to see what specific pros/cons us potentially getting married will have on our financial situation. I know they are several cons so we are weighing out our options of getting married now or until I’m down with PSLF. -Thank you
Variable rate options consist of a range from 2.50% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. The variable interest rate will change on the first day of every month (“Change Date”) if the Current Index changes. The variable interest rates are based on a Current Index, which is the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (currency in US dollars), as published on The Wall Street Journal’s website. The variable interest rates and Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will increase or decrease when the 1-month LIBOR index changes. The variable interest rates are calculated by adding a margin ranging from 0.45% to 4.25% for the 5-year term loan, 1.95% to 4.30% for the 7-year term loan, 2.20% to 4.35% for the 10-year term loan, 2.45% to 4.60% for the 15-year term loan, and 2.70% to 4.85% for the 20-year term loan, respectively, to the 1-month LIBOR index published on the 25th day of each month immediately preceding each “Change Date,” as defined above, rounded to two decimal places, with no origination fees. If the 25th day of the month is not a business day or is a US federal holiday, the reference date will be the most recent date preceding the 25th day of the month that is a business day. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 2.50% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term would be from $177.47 to $194.73. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term would be from $136.69 to $147.77. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term would be from $102.44 to $113.04. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.50% per year to 6.65% per year for a 15-year term would be from $76.50 to $87.94. The monthly payment for a sample $10,000 loan at a range of 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term would be from $64.62 to $76.93.
Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Public Service Loan Forgiveness is available to government and qualifying nonprofit employees with federal student loans. Eligible borrowers can have their remaining loan balance forgiven tax-free after making 120 qualifying loan payments. In order to benefit from PSLF, you’ll need to make payments while enrolled in an income-driven repayment plan. Otherwise, on a standard repayment plan, the loan would be paid off before you’re eligible to benefit from forgiveness.
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