Hello! I have over $120,000 in subsidized/unsubsidized student loans (not including interest). I was in dental school but I was dismissed due to failing. Now I’m stuck with loans for something I didn’t even earn. I didn’t have any loans while I was an undergraduate student, I had scholarships and grants. I’m currently pursuing a Master’s degree in public health, and I am preparing to begin a career as a teacher next year. I haven’t started paying loans yet because they’re still in deferment due to me being in school, but when I do I plan to do the IBR plan. I am hoping that I will also be able to qualify for public service loan forgiveness and teacher loan forgiveness. I believe that they’ll forgive up to $17,500 if I teach secondary science? Do you know if I could qualify for both forgiveness plans? Does teaching at a community college qualify me for public service or teacher loan forgiveness? Also, I understand that with the IBR, the loan can be canceled after 20-25 years. So, if I have the PSLF, it will be canceled in 10 years instead, correct? I also had a scholarship at the dental school that was turned into a loan because I didn’t complete the program and graduate to work in a rural area. However, I was dismissed, I didn’t voluntarily withdraw from the school. Now they’re expecting me to pay over $50,000 back, with about $20,000 of it behind and being sent to collections because they would not work with me to set up a payment arrangement (I didn’t have a job at the time). What can I do about that? Could I file bankruptcy to get rid of it? Any advice you can give will be wonderful.
Great info here. Hoping you can help me a bit. I have about $92,000 left in FFEL standard consolidation loan (consolidated 8/04) plus another roughly $120,000 in private student loans (college and medical school) and $50,000 of wife’s school loans. Interest rates aren’t bad, but if there is a path toward loan forgiveness it would make life much easier.
I am conflicted bc after reading your articles I feel like it will still make more sense for me to switch plans (in order to pay 10% of income as opposed to 15% monthly and bc I have not paid much off my debt thus far in a few years). However, my family has advised me that I need to see real numbers to know how much I will owe when my loans are forgiven in 25 years when my taxes are due. In my head adding an extra $35k to my $206k balance will be just the same when those taxes are due-seemingly impossible. But it is true that I do not know how to calculate the actual numbers to have a better idea of what kind of added interest the added $35k will make to my total that will be forgiven in 25yrs which I will then owe in taxes.
If you’re planning on taking advantage of federal loan forgiveness programs, you may not want to refinance your federal loans. Refinancing your federal student loans will disqualify you from any forgiveness programs. However, if you are ineligible for loan forgiveness, a refinance is the best way to lower your payments. To help determine if refinancing is right for you use our student loan refinancing calculator below.

For example, if you have both Direct Loans and other types of federal student loans, and you have been making payments toward PSLF on your Direct Loans, you should not consolidate your Direct Loans along with your other loans. Similarly, if you have Federal Perkins Loans and you are employed in an occupation that would qualify you for Perkins Loan cancellation benefits, you should not include your Perkins Loans when you consolidate. Leaving out your Direct Loans or Perkins Loans will preserve the benefits on those loans.
This site does not negotiate, adjust or settle debts. All federal student borrowers are able and encouraged to apply for any federal repayment or forgiveness programs through the US Department of Education for free without paying fees to any entity. Nothing on this site constitutes official qualification or guarantee of result. StudentDebtRelief.us is a private company not affiliated with the Department of Education of the Federal Government.

Military student loan forgiveness and assistance. Military personnel in the Army, Navy, Air Force, National Guard and Coast Guard may qualify for their own loan forgiveness programs. In the National Guard, for example, qualifying soldiers and officers could receive up to $50,000 to pay off federal student loans through the Student Loan Repayment Program.
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