Splash Financial: Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit calculating the interest rate, loan amount, repayment term and the timing of payments. Fixed Rates range from 3.50% APR to 7.03% APR and Variable Rates range from 2.43% APR to 7.76% APR. Both Fixed and Variable Rates will vary based on application terms, level of degree and presence of a co-signer. Fixed rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 3.75% per year to 6.49% per year for a 5-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.25% per year for a 7-year term, 4.59% to 6.54% for a 8-year term, 4.55% per year to 6.65% per year for a 10-year term, 4.79% per year to 6.59% per year for a 12-year term, 4.85% per year to 7.05% per year for a 15-year term, or 5.30% per year to 7.27% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. The fixed interest rate will apply until the loan is paid in full (whether before or after default, and whether before or after the scheduled maturity date of the loan). Variable rate options without an autopay discount consist of a range from 2.68% per year to 6.30% per year for a 5-year term, 4.00% per year to 6.35% per year for a 7-year term, 3.69% per year to 5.72% per year for a 8-year term, 4.25% per year to 6.40% per year for a 10-year term, 4.47% per year to 6.36% per year for a 12-year term, 4.50% per year to 7.76% per year for a 15-year term, or 4.75% per year to 6.90% per year for a 20-year term, with no origination fees. APR is subject to increase after consummation. Variable interest rates will fluctuate over the term of the borrower’s loan with changes in the LIBOR rate, and will vary based on applicable terms, level of degree earned and presence of a co-signer. The maximum variable rate on the student refinance loan is 9.00% for 5-year, 7-year, 8-year and 10-year terms, and 10.00% for 12-year, 15-year and 20-year terms. The floor rate is 2.00%. These rates are subject to additional terms and conditions, and rates are subject to change at any time without notice. Such changes will only apply to applications taken after the effective date of change.
i had a student loan that i got before i got married , my husband has been filing me on his taxes for almost nine years now and just so happen the us department of education took part of his taxes last year. we were told that if i didnt earn an income that they could not take his taxes because that would b against the law because i didnt earn it. is that true? and if so how can i get his money back cause they sed they can not give it back
Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. ‍ All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.19% effective August 10, 2019.
Great information, but I have a question. I had to consolidate my loans since they were not with a federal loan servicer. I am starting to repay my loans, ($200K). I have been working the last 17 years for local governments in my area. Is it true I have to be making payments at the same time I am working for the loan governments or it does not count for loan forgiveness under Public Service Forgiveness program? I am nearing retirement and this could be a problem.
If you’re planning on taking advantage of federal loan forgiveness programs, you may not want to refinance your federal loans. Refinancing your federal student loans will disqualify you from any forgiveness programs. However, if you are ineligible for loan forgiveness, a refinance is the best way to lower your payments. To help determine if refinancing is right for you use our student loan refinancing calculator below.

For eligible Associates degrees in the healthcare field (see Eligibility & Eligible Loans section below), Lender will refinance up to $50,000 in loans for non-ParentPlus refinance loans.  Note, parents who are refinancing loans taken out on behalf of a child who has obtained an associates degrees in an eligible healthcare field are not subject to the $50,000 loan maximum, refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for more information about refinancing ParentPlus loans.

I had utilized student loans to obtain a BS and then went into the Army in September 2007. I was commissioned in September 2008. I have since obtained a MS and now my BS loans are starting to become due. I am Active Guard Reserves which means I’m a Reservist on permanent active duty. My student loans are over 800.00 a month and way too high to afford. Which if any of these forgiveness programs do I qualify for and who would I contact to initiate the process?
After spending weeks communicating with other companies I had about given up on refinancing my loans. I decided to give one more company a try. Laurel Road (formerly DRB Student Loan) was such an easy online process I almost didn’t believe. I would recommend them to anyone. Student loans are stressful so it’s so nice knowing there’s a company out there to make the process as pain free as possible!
For eligible Associates degrees in the healthcare field (see Eligibility & Eligible Loans section below), Lender will refinance up to $50,000 in loans for non-ParentPlus refinance loans. Note, parents who are refinancing loans taken out on behalf of a child who has obtained an associates degrees in an eligible healthcare field are not subject to the $50,000 loan maximum, refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for more information about refinancing ParentPlus loans.
Advice please! I have $260,000 in undergraduate and graduate school loans which continues to grow due to interest. I am currently under IBR since 2011 and pay 15% of my AGI which is $100,000. I understand after 25 years any amount will be forgiven but will be taxed as income. So in 21 years after my loans continue to increase due to interest I will have approximately $450,000-$500,000 in loans forgiven. If they tax that as income that means I’ll be taxed roughly 40% of $550,000-$600,000 which is $220,00. Then I’ll have to get on a repayment to pay those taxes. It will be a never ending task to pay off my school loans unless I hit the lottery. Any advice please?
I have $129,000 in debt from school loans. However, I had surgery and almost died during the time I was in school. I got behind on my dissertation and was kicked out of school. My forbearance time is coming up. I am scheduled under federal loans for the income driven repayment. Is there any recourse? My loans are consolidated and up to date right now.
I just read that the government is investigating ITT Tech just like they did last year to another for-profit college crackdown which caused Corinthian Colleges to close. In the event that these investigations would end in the school closing their campuses, does that mean my student loans get discharged as well? I graduated in 2005. Or that only applies to recent graduates and current students?

It's almost mind-boggling how much money I'll save through refinancing my student loans with SoFi - I'd literally be paying tens of thousands more with my original loans. Now that I’ve refinanced my student loans with SoFi, I see a light at the end of the tunnel. I’m able to put away a little bit more, think about long term goals, save for a house - and I know this burden isn’t going to be over my head for the rest of my life.


It's important to note that while these "secret" student loan forgiveness options could be helpful to some borrowers, for others they may result in tax consequences (see taxes and student loan forgiveness). Under current IRS rules, you may be required to pay income tax on any amount that is forgiven if you still have a remaining balance at the end of your repayment period for any of these plans. The only exception to this is currently PSLF, which is tax free loan forgiveness.

Hi. Ten years ago my husband attended a for profit college that will officially be closing its doors in September of this year due to false recruitment practices. He worked in the field for 10 yrs but two years ago he could no longer take the pay or the hours and changed fields. His loans were all federal loans. Does he qualify for loan forgiveness?
I was on PAYE program for couple of years after grace period ended. Each year I submitted copies of my paystubs. This year, however, instead of paystubs I was only allowed to submit tax returns. Since we filed jointly with my domestic partner (not married, live and have a child together), my “income” has drastically increased. Hence, I was not qualified for PAYE. Although, we live together and file taxes jointly, I think it’s wrong to dismiss my actual income. I work part-time and dont make too much at all, so I’m barely able to meet the standard monthly payments. Is there any way around submitting your taxes to qualify for PAYE?
I received my master’s degree in 1998 and have been paying towards my federal loans since (aside from a short period of forebearance). I entered the IBR plan about two years ago. In terms of the loan forgiveness component, do my seventeen years of payments prior to entering IBR count towards the 25-year forgiveness mark, or did that 25-year period only commence with my entrance in the IBR program itself (in which case I would conceivably be paying off my loan over 42 years)?
On IBR, your loan balance is forgiven after your repayment term (20 or 25 years). The best thing to do is make the payment you can afford. If you’re on IBR, and your payment is $0, you likely don’t have much income. If you can make extra payments, great – but don’t compromise other financial goals/issues to make extra payments (i.e. don’t get behind on car payments, go into credit card debt, etc.).
Robert I really appreciate what you are doing here. This student loan thing is so complicated. I am the parent of a grad-student who graduated in May with a degree in film (screenwriting) we co-signed on his private loans ($130k) and he still doesn’t have permanent/full time work. We have spoken to the loan provider and they want us to repay the loans since our son can’t yet. I don’t know how many of these options are available for private loans. Right now they want $1100 per month, which we can’t pay and neither can our son. We should never have co-signed because now its going to affect our credit and his. What are out options? Thanks
It depends on where you work today and what type of loans you have. It’s not about your school or what you did or didn’t do. Do you work in public service? Do you have Federal loans? If so, you’ll likely qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness. If you have Federal loans, you’ll likely qualify for one of the repayment plans above that includes forgiveness.
1. Student loan collateral is your earnings. So like a car loan, the collateral is the car. If you don’t pay your car loan, the bank takes your car. It’s basically the same things for student loans. That’s why consumer protections like bankruptcy don’t apply. If you ever have the potential to earn money above subsistence level, that money (at least a portion of it) will go towards the debt. Whether you agree or disagree, that’s how it’s setup.
My daughter is in a repayment plan for teachers (IBF?) that was told would be forgiven after 10 years. Through the 1st 3 years, with income and dependents, she has had no monthly payment to date. In trying to buy a house the mortgage company wants to use 2% of the outstanding student loan…. $73,000…. in debt to income ratio. $1460/mo is over 40% of her monthly “GROSS”…. she an elementary teacher, not a brain surgeon! The loan shows on her credit report but shows no monthly payment and nothing owed….. its just there.

I went to a community college in SE Missouri. A financial/education advisor was assigned to me like every other student. After receiving next to no true help from my assigned advisor, at my adamit request I was denied using any other then the one assigned. I must admit She did help with my decision to become a history teacher with great enthusiasm. Although she was a great help with setting my goal she gave me no instruction to accomplish my goal outside of what Prerequisite classes where required and what financial options where available. Nothing about what was required of me nor how to properly handle the responsibility that came along with the financial assistance I required. But the worst part was she couldn’t comprehend the details for the post 9/11 GI Bill causing her to provide inaccurate information as well as refused to take in the fact that I was unable to go full time and seemed to be quite annoyed that I wouldn’t cut out my income to follow the rules ”I” discovered the GI Bill required for assistance. Having been out of school for as long as I had and being ignorant to the financial assistance programs I made decisions on what little information I was able to muster, needless to say I became quite overwhelmed and was incapable of performing the tasks required. I then gave into her insistent advice and went full time to take advantage of free government assistance. This, was not a good decision on my part so I dropped a class (with correct/incorrect info I was able to drop one class without penalty) so I chose to drop biology having been the class I was struggling the most with this put me over a half a credit causing me to loose my GI Bill as well as Pell Grant. I also took out a federal loan to subsidize my lost income due to going full time. I didn’t go back the next semester because of my lost assistance and fear of putting myself into more debt. That being said, time has gone by and I’m more informed and less intimidated but can’t seem to come up with a plan to accomplish my goal/dream to teach. I can’t afford to pay out of pocket for a full time semester to get my assistance’s back. How can I go about loan deferral to gain approval for one more loan?
I have around $190k in loans consolidated. I make $86k a year and my husband brings in about $50k. I put the loans in IBR 2 years ago and they want my payments to be over $1800/month. There is no way possible we can pay that!! So at the time I put them in forbearance. Now I need to do something and want to pay on them but honestly can’t do it at that payment amount. What other options do I have?
I will start repaying my 75,000 loan (undergrad/grad). I’m a military spouse and currently don’t have a job. How I can tackle my student loan with only 1 income. I’m planning to join the Navy reserve, will that help forgive some of my loan? What is the best way to pay off my loan considering our current income situation? I can pay at least 200 a month but can I do that or the FedLoan servicing will set the amount that I need to pay? You’re feedback will be very helpful. Thank you.
Should she be eligable for a possible $0 monthly payment with no income even though we file jointly, or does the fact that we are married mean my income has to contribute to her ability to pay? This is where it has been unclear to me. Can she report her income on the IBR paperwork as $0 even though she’s filed on my tax return as joint? If that is the case completely agree that with no income she should qualify for a $0 payment but I was under the impression that I had to use our tax return AGI for both our IBR forms.
After loan disbursement, if a borrower documents a qualifying economic hardship, we may agree in our discretion to allow for full or partial forbearance of payments for one or more 3-month time periods (not to exceed 12 months in the aggregate during the term of your loan), provided that we receive acceptable documentation (including updating documentation) of the nature and expected duration of the borrower’s economic hardship.

It's important to note that while these "secret" student loan forgiveness options could be helpful to some borrowers, for others they may result in tax consequences (see taxes and student loan forgiveness). Under current IRS rules, you may be required to pay income tax on any amount that is forgiven if you still have a remaining balance at the end of your repayment period for any of these plans. The only exception to this is currently PSLF, which is tax free loan forgiveness.

“Obama Student Loan Forgiveness” is a nickname for the William D. Ford Direct Loan program. The name came about when President Obama reformed part of the Direct Loan program in 2010 by signing the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.  As a result of expanded funding for federal student loans, more borrowers gained access to more options with loan repayment.
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