Yes I’m in the process of filing an application for loan forgiveness for a parent plus loan I’ve got all the info and the original denial letter from sallie Mae that said I wasn’t able to get this loan then was given one how in the hell does this happen. My son attended that ITT Tech school back in 2010. Do you think I will get some forgiveness for the institute falsely misrepresented my credit history?
If you have Federal loans, an income-based repayment plan can really help make your loans affordable. But yes, it does take a long time to pay them off. The other option is to work/earn more. $14,000 really isn’t much student loan debt (even though it might feel like it). You could pay that off in about 5 years if you can find an extra $200 per month to pay towards it.

I believe this is misleading, You mentioned having $50k forgiven at the end of an income-based repayment term, that the tax owed is cheaper than the loan + interest. But the $50K you would owe at that point *is* the remaining loan + interest. If your IBR amount was covering the interest and some of the principle you’d likely have paid a ton more interest than you would have if you stayed on a 10-year term, but if your payments did not cover the interest, then your loan balance would have been increasing over time. That $50k could have represented a $12k original loan… If you qualified to pay nothing — then with a 6.5% interest loan over 25 years you’d end-up paying tax on 5x the original balance… You’d likely be pushed into a much higher tax bracket. I believe this is a dangerous recommendation for you to make. If the tax law change, then great, but there’s no guarantee of that. Can you explain your logic in the light that unpaid interest in accruing in your loan balance?
“Obama Student Loan Forgiveness” is a nickname for the William D. Ford Direct Loan program. The name came about when President Obama reformed part of the Direct Loan program in 2010 by signing the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.  As a result of expanded funding for federal student loans, more borrowers gained access to more options with loan repayment.
I have $129,000 in debt from school loans. However, I had surgery and almost died during the time I was in school. I got behind on my dissertation and was kicked out of school. My forbearance time is coming up. I am scheduled under federal loans for the income driven repayment. Is there any recourse? My loans are consolidated and up to date right now.

Also, I am currently back in school and now have federal loans that are deferred while I’m enrolled, but I want to understand what the best thing to do is once I graduate and have to start paying those back as well. I have felt a little lost in this process and don’t know where to turn/who to ask for advice, especially with the private loans and the balance that won’t go down. I appreciate any advice.
I have two graduate school loans from 2010 to 2013 – Stafford Loan and Grad Plus loan. I am currently enrolled in the pay as you earn program but am confused on the “loan forgiveness” opportunities. If I am not working in a public sector; can I still qualify for the 10 year forgiveness or does that automatically place me in the 25 year category? Also, am I responsible for taxes on the amount that is forgiven after 10 or 25 (whichever is applicable to my situation)?

We may agree under certain circumstances to allow postponement (deferral) of monthly payments of principal and interest for a period of time immediately following loan disbursement (not to exceed 6 months after the borrower’s graduation with an eligible degree), if the borrower is an eligible student in the borrower’s final term at the time of loan disbursement or graduated less than 6 months before loan disbursement, and has accepted an offer of (or has already begun) full-time employment.
Tim, I took out loans under similar circumstances. I know the loans were federal but I have no idea what the program was. I know they weren’t Perkins loans and I’m not sure if they were Stafford loans or not but I think they were. The loans were serviced by SalieMae from inception starting around 1994. I moved out of forbearance, consolidated the loan to a 25 year repayment plan and have made every payment since September of 2004. I’ve also been a public sector (state) employee since 2002. I’m having trouble determining if my loans qualify. The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program stipulates that “only loans you received under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program are eligible for PSLF.” I’ve never heard of the program and assume it was created concurrent or subsequent to the inception of this program in 2007. Does that mean I am only eligible if I took out the original loans, or consolidated my loans after a certain date?
I had a 47,000 student loan from 1997. In 2008 I was a substitute teacher and was not able to get any kind of loan adjustments to save my home. I have since stayed with various relatives and today I received a letter from a debt collector stating that the loan has been turned over to them. The last time I moved I was able to get work as a substitute teacher again. School has just begun so I am not working yet. The letter says that I now owe almost 90,000. $40,000 has been added to my loan. What should I do and do I qualify for any kind of loan forgiveness. How is it different since, it has been turned over to a debt collector.
For example, if you have both Direct Loans and other types of federal student loans, and you have been making payments toward PSLF on your Direct Loans, you should not consolidate your Direct Loans along with your other loans. Similarly, if you have Federal Perkins Loans and you are employed in an occupation that would qualify you for Perkins Loan cancellation benefits, you should not include your Perkins Loans when you consolidate. Leaving out your Direct Loans or Perkins Loans will preserve the benefits on those loans.
I am an officer in the army reserves I was active duty for two years with a deployment I have a contract for 8 years in the reserves but I still have about 60k in loans from school while in rotc but I am currently not full time is their anyway to get my loans forgiven or is my only option is to keep doing the income based repayment plan and in 20 years have them forgiven and would I have to stay in for 20
Yes I’m in the process of filing an application for loan forgiveness for a parent plus loan I’ve got all the info and the original denial letter from sallie Mae that said I wasn’t able to get this loan then was given one how in the hell does this happen. My son attended that ITT Tech school back in 2010. Do you think I will get some forgiveness for the institute falsely misrepresented my credit history?

My 120 qualifying payments could take me 20+ years to eventually make if I let it. With the NHSC program, the requirements are much more specific, rural area, two year commitment, etc. I am interested in potentially applying for the NHSC program as well. I know that the two programs work differently and I am wondering if you know whether or not they could be used simultaneously? Are you aware of whether or not this has this been done before?
If you are certifying and still have some time left to hit 120 payments – your loans will transfer to Fedloan Servicing (Federal Student Aid is simply a program name, not a loan servicer). FedLoan handles all PSLF requests for the Department of Education. Nothing with your loans change (payment, amount, etc), simply who you make payment to changes.
Peace Corps volunteers are eligible to apply for Stafford, Perkins and Consolidation loans deferment, as well as partial cancellations of Perkins Loans (at 15% for each year of service, up to a maximum of 70% in total loan Perkins Loans forgiveness for service). For more information, contact the Peace Corps at 1-800-424-8580, or visit the Peace Corps website here.
You can refinance both your federal student loans and your private student loans through a private lender, such as a bank or one of the lenders offered by LendingTree. Refinancing your loans will combine all of them into one loan with one monthly payment. Your interest rate will be based off of your credit score, so if it’s higher than when you first applied, you should score an incredibly low rate.
I have been working for a non profit public university for the past 4 years and loyally paying on my loans…under a graduated repayment plan 🙁 I thought my payments qualified! Nobody ever told me a graduated repayment plan would disqualify me from loan forgiveness! I feel like I’ve lost 4 years that I desperately needed toward paying these off. What do I do??? Is there any way to make those 4 years count? The plans that do qualify were only $30 a month more than what I’ve been paying, it seems so silly…and now I’m so discouraged…
I am currently on IBR repayment plan and have been now for 2 years. I am in my 5 year of teaching. When do I apply for Public Loan Forgiveness? Is it after I have taught 10 years? What if I take a year off due to having a child, will that affect my 10 years of working for the Public loan forgiveness? Also when would my loans be forgiven? I have tried speaking with rep from fed loan however I feel that I am even more confused than before. What exactly do I need to do to have loans forgiven?
Graduates may refinance any unsubsidized or subsidized Federal or private student loan that was used exclusively for qualified higher education expenses (as defined in 26 USC Section 221) at an accredited U.S. undergraduate or graduate school. Any federal loans refinanced with Lender are private loans and do not have the same repayment options that federal loan program offers such as Income Based Repayment or Income Contingent Repayment.
Given your debt load and income, my guess is you’re a lawyer or doctor. Remember, the goal of such a high degree of education is to boost your income. Do you think you’ll be at $100k forever, or do you expect that to climb? I would expect it to climb, which also means your payments will rise under IBR, and you could also make extra payments to lower your debt.
All plans just look at your income from your tax return – so it also depends on how you file (married filing jointly versus married filing separately). That discretionary income is calculated on your AGI from your return, and it’s the same metric used for IBR, ICR, and PAYE. The difference is that IBR is 15% of discretionary income, while ICR is 20%. ICR also does not include forgiveness at the end, so IBR is always better.
The quoted Annual Percentage Rate (APR) with discount includes a customer interest rate discount of 0.25% for having a prior student loan with Wells Fargo or a qualified Wells Fargo consumer checking account and requires a 5-year term. APRs may vary based on terms selected. Repayment term options may include 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 years based on credit qualifications. (A 20-year repayment term is available when the consolidation loan amount is $50,000 or more). Variable interest rates are based on an Index, plus a margin. The Index is equal to the Prime rate published in the Wall Street Journal. The APR for a variable rate loan may increase during the life of the loan if the index increases. This may result in higher monthly payments. Rates are current as of 10/01/2019 and subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo reserves the right to change rates, terms, and fees at any time. Your actual APR will depend upon your credit transaction, credit history, and loan term selected and will be determined when a credit decision is made. For questions, please contact us at 1-877-315-7723.
Great information, but I have a question. I had to consolidate my loans since they were not with a federal loan servicer. I am starting to repay my loans, ($200K). I have been working the last 17 years for local governments in my area. Is it true I have to be making payments at the same time I am working for the loan governments or it does not count for loan forgiveness under Public Service Forgiveness program? I am nearing retirement and this could be a problem.
I’ve been making about $200 payments on my combined 2 private loans and $0 payments on my Direct/Stafford loans under the Income Driven Repayment plan for about 5 years now. Every year I have to send my information to renew the plan before I’m charged $500+ a month. So I’m a bit confused about how after the payment plan ends the loan will be forgiven. Am I missing some fine print somewhere?
I just have come across your website and this blog. A job well done, and thank you! I had to step down from my career in September of 2009 and file for disability. I was awarded full disability in August of 2011, and it was retroactive back to the time of initial filing – in September of 2009. I have been utilizing forbearance all this time, not knowing about “TPD Discharge” until this past week. My forbearance is up in six days, from today (according to Navient (formally Sallie Mae as I am sure you know), and I only have a little time left on forbearance – “student loan debt burden.” I have always paid any debt I owed and had full intentions of doing this as well. However, I had no clue my health and a surgery in 2011 to correct the “issue” would go awry overnight. I have read some on the “total and permanent disability discharge” and see that if they approve they would monitor you for five years to make sure you did not return to work. My goal is to return to work. I refuse to take “no” for an answer from a lot “people.” I just lost almost four years of returning to work after surgery due to the “mess up” with the surgery, and the fact that a neurosurgeon will not see a prior surgical patient until after a three-year-mark from the original surgery. I finally have consult appointments with to NS’s the first of December. Do you know if the TPD Discharge is retroactive (or if I can even apply if I am looking for it to be retroactive?” As well, I need to do something, quickly as my forbearance ends in six days, as I stated above. Would you suggest applying for a new forbearance right now and then embarking on the TPD Discharge? I feel horrible about this as I always pay my debt, but the interest and such is accruing, I do not make the money I used to make, no matter how much I made all these years working, your disability income is not substantial to survive on a “bare note” these days. I just need some help in understanding or if you have any thoughts about what to do. Thank you again for your help. I hope you enjoy your weekend!
My 120 qualifying payments could take me 20+ years to eventually make if I let it. With the NHSC program, the requirements are much more specific, rural area, two year commitment, etc. I am interested in potentially applying for the NHSC program as well. I know that the two programs work differently and I am wondering if you know whether or not they could be used simultaneously? Are you aware of whether or not this has this been done before?
FFEL Consolidation Loan to use the no accrual of interest benefit for active duty service members, which states that you’re not required to pay the interest that accrues during periods of qualifying active duty military service (for up to 60 months) on the portion of a Direct Consolidation Loan that repaid a Direct Loan Program or FFEL Program loan first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008.
I was enrolled in Army ROTC from 2007-2011. I had a false statement filed against me and was given one of two options. Serve 4 years active duty starting out as an E-1, or fight it with a formal board. I fought it and just recently have exhausted all my appeals. Several cadre members had even made statements pertaining to how the process was stacked against me from the beginning. I involved a state Senator and Congresswoman who both opened congressional inquiries. Still to no avail.
I have been on the IBR plan, and now have payments I can’t make — due to the fact that I have two special needs children whose monthly expenses exceed $800 (one is Type 1 diabetic and one is on ABA for autism.) According to my loan servicer, the only option at this point is to consolidate. This is really frustrating. I have tried my best to do what is needed, but now I am getting to the point where even though my husband and I are both making decent money, we are having to choose between food and paying student loans, since not getting insulin is off the table obviously. We have exhausted the limits for putting off payments. I am simply hoping to keep everything together at this point, but my frustration and stress level about it is just through the roof. Ugh. I owe, about 90K, my husband about 10K. We both have master’s degrees and work in the public sector (me at a public school district, him at a state university.) We also live in the SF Bay Area, which is expensive — but we would be getting paid a fraction of what we make now with pathetic health benefits (to say nothing of hospital/dr access) if we were to move.
I have a hard time finding any jobs I qualify for in some of the very rural areas the Army sends my husband. I have been told I’m over qualified since I have my master’s degree to work at a college. I was also in a car wreck in 2003 and now have a lot of issues with my knee (have had surgery) and neck (need surgery). My brother who is an RN said I definitely need to qualify for disability… But I’ve been fighting it, not sure I’m ready to do that. But there are times when I can’t use my left arm and have been in physical therapy so many times now for my neck and knee. My husband (been married 11 years) has no plans of helping me pay on my student loans at all. And some employers don’t want to hire a military spouse knowing we’ll have to move within 2 years. This student loan debt is ALWAYS on my mind and I get very depressed over it (I graduated in 1995 and did pay on them before I started moving around with my husband.) I just don’t even know what to do…
My granddaughter went to school locally for part of a qtr. (2015) She was actually pregnant before she started and then she couldn’t finish. She was a minority (ethnically) and received alot of bullying and couldn’t take it. She owes about $7,000. The school turned it over to a collection agency. She can’t afford to pay that back. She is single and now has another child. Can you give me any ideas to help on what she can do?
Good Morning Robert, I did an (Obama) forgivness loan agreement with NationalStudentCenter.com 1(866)359-3821. Currently unemployed and said I qualified for my loans to be consolidated and reduced all the way to $0 for the next 20-30 month with the first 3months being $197.33. Paid thru my checking and already one month in. The wierd thing is I had to Esign the App so they can move forward with the process. I received an email from NelNet saying that they received my App. But I never Esigned the App because I started to become skeptical about the loan. With the info that I just provided you, can your expertise tell me if this is a scam? If so how do I get out of it.
To request technical assistance while you are signed in and completing the Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Application and Promissory Note online, select the “Contact Us” tab in the top menu bar of StudentLoans.gov. From there, you can either complete and submit the feedback form or select “Additional Information” and contact the Student Loan Support Center at the phone number provided.
I am an EMT/Firefighter working for a tribal fire and rescue agency. I am also a local volunteer fire fighter. I started my AS in respiratory therapy almost 2 years ago and received Stafford loans. I do not know why they didn’t give me Perkins loans or if it matters. I have a 3.97 GPA and am due to graduate in December with a huge bill. Despite my years of service, good grades and financial need, I have been unable to find scholarships or grants beyond the federal programs. I am trying to be smart about my upcoming student loans and not make mistakes. From all my reading, it seems I would have been better off with Perkins loans, but despite my inquiries to the school… I haven’t received any reason why or information regarding the matter. Any advice?

Hi I was 2 months away from being out of default on my student loans when I decided to claim bankruptcy 5 years ago. (We had fraud on accounts we counldnt get past.) I kept the same payment thinking it would complete it and switch over. Well it didn’t. So they have kept my student loans in default the whole time for 5 years on my credit report although we made payments, it all went to interest and fees. The fees in 5 years, and I have made payments every month, are $17,000! So now I owe $72K. When I graduated in 2000 I owed $38K. I guess what I want to know is can a company charge these fees in a federal student loan legally, because that doesn’t seem right when payments were being made. Because even in 25 years and I can write it off it’s more of a tax liability for me.
I would recommend you call the for-profit company called the Student Loan Relief Helpline. Please do note that this is not a free service, and it’s not a Government Service, but a profit-driven organization that helps people reduce their monthly payments and find out how to qualify for loan forgiveness benefits. You can reach them here: 1-888-694-8235.
I have $129,000 in debt from school loans. However, I had surgery and almost died during the time I was in school. I got behind on my dissertation and was kicked out of school. My forbearance time is coming up. I am scheduled under federal loans for the income driven repayment. Is there any recourse? My loans are consolidated and up to date right now.
Right now, you aren’t eligible for the reduced loan forgiveness benefit (forgiveness after 20 years), since your loans are older than October 1st, 2007. You should be eligible for forgiveness after 25 years of payments in 2022 though, and if they remove the qualification regarding age of the loan, then you may end up qualifying for complete forgiveness earlier.
If any of the loans you want to consolidate are still in the grace period, you have the option of indicating on your Direct Consolidation Loan application that you want the servicer that is processing your application to delay the consolidation of your loans until closer to the grace period end date. If you select this option, you won’t have to begin making payments on your new Direct Consolidation Loan until closer to the end of the grace period on your current loans.

I’ve been working for a non-profit for 4.5 years, and am on IBR, and have made 47 payments (full, on-time, etc….in other words, “qualifying payments.”) I have certified my employment. About half my loans ($25k) are through FedLoans, and the other half are through Navient. I’m on IBR for both. Navient told me they “don’t handle PSLF.” FedLoans told me I need to move my loans to them, by contacting Navient and asking them to transfer them to FedLoans. I did, and Navient told me they couldn’t transfer them, and that I should consider consolidation. It looks like if I consolidate, I’ll lose credit for the payments I’ve made!
I have been very impressed with my application process with LendKey! Their customer service team is prompt in responding to any inquiries via email and very helpful on the phone! The application process was easy to follow and very user friendly! With LendKey's help, I'll be saving nearly $400 per month on my student loans! I'm absolutely thrilled and feel like I can breathe again knowing how much this is going to help me financially and the ability to pay my loans off faster. Thank you LendKey!
Hello I saw this article and found it confusing. I am in $35-40k in debt and my loans are in good standing because I’ve deferred them but of course the interest is what had escalated. I just started working and muy income is not very high at al and am a single mother of 3. What do you suggest I do? I’m not quite sure which plan would work. Also if you get on one of these plans do they pull/take your income tax every year?

Your credit score is a barometer of your financial responsibility. Most lenders evaluate your credit score (or its underlying components), and want to ensure that you meet your financial obligations and have a history of on-time payments. Generally, top lenders expect a minimum credit score in the mid to high 600's, while others do not have a minimum.
You can refinance one or more federal and/or private student loans, but you must meet a lender’s requirements for credit and income. Most lenders look for a credit score of 650 or higher, along with a steady source of income or an offer of employment. If you can’t meet these criteria on your own, you could qualify by applying with a creditworthy cosigner, such as a parent.
I am unemployed and my loans are in default, if I set up a payment plan will my loans come out of default? if so how soon. I know this sounds strange but I can not get a job in my field without an Bachelors or Masters I currently have an Associates) and want to go back to school to finish, I need loans to accomplish this. Also will I be able to get federal loans… or will that require private banks and I do not have a co-signer, there are eight of us kids, Mom is co-signed out!
Also, I am currently back in school and now have federal loans that are deferred while I’m enrolled, but I want to understand what the best thing to do is once I graduate and have to start paying those back as well. I have felt a little lost in this process and don’t know where to turn/who to ask for advice, especially with the private loans and the balance that won’t go down. I appreciate any advice.
Automatically withdrawn payment discount (“ACH”) — You may qualify for a 0.25% interest rate discount during repayment if you set up automatically withdrawn payments (ACH), directly with Wells Fargo Education Financial Services (EFS), from a designated deposit account. This discount does not apply to bill pay or automatic transfers not set up directly with Wells Fargo EFS. If the automatic payment is canceled at any time after repayment begins, the discount will be lost until automatic payment is reinstated. The 0.25% interest rate reduction is effective the day after the first payment is made using automatic withdrawal during the repayment period. The discount reduces the amount of interest you pay over the life of the loan. The automatic payment discount may not change your monthly payment amount depending on the type of loan you receive, but may reduce the number of payments or the amount of your final payment. ACH payments and discount will discontinue upon entering deferment or forbearance periods.
Designed to help you understand how consolidation will affect each of your loans, our detailed loan review process will provide you with the in-depth information you need in order to make an informed decision about which loans you want to consolidate and which loans you may want to leave out. You can reach out to your Student Loan Consultant at any point during the process.
You — or your co-signer— typically need credit scores that are at least in the high 600s. Many refinance lenders seek borrowers with scores in the mid-700s. The better your (or your co-signer’s) credit, the better the rate you’ll likely qualify for. Additionally, you need enough income to comfortably cover your expenses, student loan payments and and other debts.

You’ll have to evaluate your situation to decide whether refinancing federal student loans is a wise decision. For example, if you work in the public sector and could qualify for loan forgiveness in the future, you’d typically be better off keeping your federal loans. On the other hand, if you don’t work in the public sector and you’ve had no problems making your loan payments to date, then you may want to go ahead and refinance to save money on interest.
Forgiven loans may be taxable. Generally, forgiven, canceled or discharged student debt is taxed as income unless you were required to work for a certain type of employer or in a certain profession to qualify for the forgiveness. For instance, loans discharged through Public Service Loan Forgiveness are not taxable, but debt forgiven through income-driven repayment plans is taxable. Loans discharged upon a borrower’s death or permanent disability were previously taxed as income, but the latest tax code changed that. Loans discharged for this reason after Dec. 31, 2017, are not taxable.
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