I have loans before 2007. My lender advised that I go through REPAYE. Because I’m getting married in 2016, I’d rather go under PAYE (in order to file married but seperate). If I consolidate my loans (which I’ve also been advised to do perhaps because some are Stafford and REPAYE doesn’t cover those???), would I then qualify for PAYE? What other benefits/consquences are there to consolidating loans?


This student loan forgiveness program cancels a percentage of a borrower’s Federal Perkins Loan if they work full-time in an eligible field. You will have a portion of your loans forgiven for each year of service. The specific cancellation terms depend on your line of work, but this program awards up to 100% forgiveness. For the majority of Perkins Loan cancellations, the cancellation terms are as follows:

In short, refinancing student loans generally does not hurt your credit. When getting your initial rate estimate, all that’s required is a ’soft credit inquiry,’ which doesn’t affect your credit score at all. Once you determine which lender has the best offer (Earnest, we hope), you’ll complete a full application. This application does require a ‘hard credit inquiry,’ which can have a minor credit impact (typically a few points). However, in the months and years after refinancing, your credit score should see steady improvement as you make on-time payments and pay down your debt.


Closed school discharge. You may qualify for loan discharge if your school closes. At the time of closure, you must have been enrolled or have left within 120 days, without receiving a degree. If you qualify, contact your loan servicer to start the application process. You’ll need to continue making payments on your loan while your application is being processed. If you’re approved, you will no longer have to make loan payments and you may be refunded some or all of the past payments you made on the loan.

I went back to college at 35, just to get the piece of paper because I couldn’t get an accounting job without a degree after moving to a college town, even with nearly 20 years experience. Because of my hour commute to the next state for work, my most flexible choice was Univ of Phoenix online. I graduated in 2011, and went into repayment in March 2012. I paid 1 loan off before graduation and I’ve paid ahead since then, killing off 1 loan at a time so I’m down to only 5 loans left, with 1 of them paid down so it’ll pay off over a year early. Because I had my payment frozen a couple years ago, I’m also paying about $50 extra a month. I haven’t worked in almost a year and a half for medical reasons, and am waiting for a disability appeal hearing because I was denied on a technicality, so my boyfriend has been covering my student loan payment to protect my credit, and because I was raised that you pay what you owe. Am I better off continuing as is or will an IBR program not hurt my credit standing? It’s not that he minds, but I feel bad about him paying it when I can’t work.

It's that simple.  What's even better is that your income could be low enough to qualify for zero or minimal repayment, at which your loan will be forgiven at the end. Yes, there may be tax consequences, but that shouldn't deter you from these programs. It is the best alternative if you can't afford your loans and you are looking for forgiveness options (and we discuss the taxes a bit at the end of the article).
I graduated back in 1991. In 92 or 93 I consolidated about $23,000 dollars in student debt with Sallie Mae. Over the next several years I had to do Forbearance a few times but by 2008 I had made about $51,000 in payments and had a balance of around $27,000. The economy crashed and the non-profit I worked for had to drop my income – a lot. We had to short-sell our house. I picked up some side work and eventually left the non-profit (501c3) in 2010. I took another job and essentially started over from a career standpoint.
After spending weeks communicating with other companies I had about given up on refinancing my loans. I decided to give one more company a try. Laurel Road (formerly DRB Student Loan) was such an easy online process I almost didn’t believe. I would recommend them to anyone. Student loans are stressful so it’s so nice knowing there’s a company out there to make the process as pain free as possible!

Hello Robert, so i have set up a income based repayment plan. The lowest payment for me to make is 600 a month and with my other debts and private student loans i can not afford this amount. I want to make payments but this is just way to much. They said this is based on income and that it is my only option. How can i pay a lesser amount with out being penalized? I am a school counselor.
There are no origination fees or prepayment penalties associated with the loan. Lender may assess a late fee if any part of a payment is not received within 15 days of the payment due date. Any late fee assessed shall not exceed 5% of the late payment or $28, whichever is less. A borrower may be charged $20 for any payment (including a check or an electronic payment) that is returned unpaid due to non-sufficient funds (NSF) or a closed account.
If you’re planning on taking advantage of federal loan forgiveness programs, you may not want to refinance your federal loans. Refinancing your federal student loans will disqualify you from any forgiveness programs. However, if you are ineligible for loan forgiveness, a refinance is the best way to lower your payments. To help determine if refinancing is right for you use our student loan refinancing calculator below.

Auto Pay discount: If you make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic, monthly deduction from a savings or checking account, your rate will be reduced by one quarter of one percent (0.25%) for so long as you continue to make automatic, electronic monthly payments. This benefit is suspended during periods of deferment and forbearance.


I have $60,000 in student loan debt from becoming a counselor, I was on the Public service forgiveness program on the IBR plan working at a social service agency, I made 5 years of qualifying payments but I recently left to go into private practice so I wouldn’t have to deal with insurance companies and productivity requirements, but I am assuming now being self employed, although I am doing the same kind off work, that this employment will no longer qualify for public service forgiveness, is this correct? Any suggestions on how to navigate this?
SoFi: Fixed rates from 3.46% APR to 5.98% APR (with AutoPay). Variable rates from 2.05% APR to 5.98% APR (with AutoPay). Interest rates on variable rate loans are capped at either 8.95% or 9.95% depending on term of loan. See APR examples and terms. Lowest variable rate of 2.05% APR assumes current 1 month LIBOR rate of 2.05% minus 0.15% margin minus 0.25% ACH discount. Not all borrowers receive the lowest rate. If approved for a loan, the fixed or variable interest rate offered will depend on your creditworthiness, and the term of the loan and other factors, and will be within the ranges of rates listed above. For the SoFi variable rate loan, the 1-month LIBOR index will adjust monthly and the loan payment will be re-amortized and may change monthly. APRs for variable rate loans may increase after origination if the LIBOR index increases. See eligibility details. The SoFi 0.25% AutoPay interest rate reduction requires you to agree to make monthly principal and interest payments by an automatic monthly deduction from a savings or checking account. The benefit will discontinue and be lost for periods in which you do not pay by automatic deduction from a savings or checking account. *To check the rates and terms you qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit inquiry. Unlike hard credit inquiries, soft credit inquiries (or soft credit pulls) do not impact your credit score. Soft credit inquiries allow SoFi to show you what rates and terms SoFi can offer you up front. After seeing your rates, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit inquiry. Hard credit inquiries (or hard credit pulls) are required for SoFi to be able to issue you a loan. In addition to requiring your explicit permission, these credit pulls may impact your credit score. Terms and Conditions Apply. SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE.
Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on a 1-month LIBOR assumption of 2.05% effective September 10, 2019.
When you’re in garnishment, the companies servicing your loan refuse any attempt at refinancing. Can you do some in-depth research on ways to finally pay this off? I am considering borrowing against my meager 403b to pay off the loans, just so they don’t garnish for another decade and then start on my Social Security. The balance hasn’t moved in more than 10 years, because it all goes toward “fees” they add every month. I’m in indentured servitude to these people. Also, will you consider writing about how to be assured you won’t be re-billed for loans that are paid?
I have been working for a non profit public university for the past 4 years and loyally paying on my loans…under a graduated repayment plan 🙁 I thought my payments qualified! Nobody ever told me a graduated repayment plan would disqualify me from loan forgiveness! I feel like I’ve lost 4 years that I desperately needed toward paying these off. What do I do??? Is there any way to make those 4 years count? The plans that do qualify were only $30 a month more than what I’ve been paying, it seems so silly…and now I’m so discouraged…
For eligible Associates degrees in the healthcare field (see Eligibility & Eligible Loans section below), Lender will refinance up to $50,000 in loans for non-ParentPlus refinance loans.  Note, parents who are refinancing loans taken out on behalf of a child who has obtained an associates degrees in an eligible healthcare field are not subject to the $50,000 loan maximum, refer to https://www.laurelroad.com/refinance-student-loans/refinance-parent-plus-loans/ for more information about refinancing ParentPlus loans.
I came across your blog in my pursuit of refinancing my student loans which I consolidated back in 1999. I currently have a consolidated subsidized loan with approximately $25k outstanding, and a consolidated unsubsidized loan with approximately $35k outstanding. Both loans have a fixed rate of 7.25%. If it’s relevant, the owner of both loans is Keybank, and both loans are guaranteed by PHEAA. To my understanding, I have not been paying the loans back pursuant to any specific payment plan (e.g., IBR, PAYE, graduated repayment plan, etc.), but on a regular monthly payment plan amortized over a 30 year period. I took advantage of the deferment option for two (2) years in the past, and at my current interest rate and payment amount, I’m estimated to pay the loans off in 2032. My question to you is “Can my loans be forgiven in the 25 year period that I have read about in your blog?” If so, when would the 25 year period have begun for determining when my loans will be forgiven? If my loans are not able to be forgiven, what are my options if any (other than refinancing the loans to lower the interest rate)?
These programs should be looked down upon. We’re allowing adults to borrow, and then fail to deliver on their promise to repay. The burden of their failure to pay is carried by the taxpayer, generally those who repay their debts to society. Honest people are being punished by others poor education investments. If we keep incentivizing behavior like this, the entire society will suffer. I can’t blame those taking advantage of this system, it seems to be in their best interest in the short term. The problem lies with those who create the system, generally politicians who create social programs to buy voters.
I had utilized student loans to obtain a BS and then went into the Army in September 2007. I was commissioned in September 2008. I have since obtained a MS and now my BS loans are starting to become due. I am Active Guard Reserves which means I’m a Reservist on permanent active duty. My student loans are over 800.00 a month and way too high to afford. Which if any of these forgiveness programs do I qualify for and who would I contact to initiate the process?
Many lenders offer student loan refinancing, from traditional banks, to credit unions to online lenders. Before choosing one, shop around and compare your offers. Several lenders make it easy to get an instant rate quote online with no impact on your credit score. By checking your rates with a variety of providers, you can find a refinanced student loan with the best possible terms.
Public Service Loan Forgiveness. Public Service Loan Forgiveness is available to government and qualifying nonprofit employees with federal student loans. Eligible borrowers can have their remaining loan balance forgiven tax-free after making 120 qualifying loan payments. In order to benefit from PSLF, you’ll need to make payments while enrolled in an income-driven repayment plan. Otherwise, on a standard repayment plan, the loan would be paid off before you’re eligible to benefit from forgiveness.
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